Your Management Plan

Discussion in 'Fourth Grade' started by Ms.Jasztal, Jul 26, 2009.

  1. Ms.Jasztal

    Ms.Jasztal Maven

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    Jul 26, 2009

    What is your behavior plan, and what are your consequences? I think the red/yellow/green system is too young for them, but I loved reading about another system yesterday where they can move up or down on a scale- they all start out at good, then they go up to two higher ones than good, or go down to specific consequences (I would never use words like poor because that would probably provoke some "smart-alecky" kid.). I've also used a system where I wrote their names on the board with the number of the rule they didn't follow- and if they got to three, they lost recess for the week/perhaps had a discipline warning notice. Sometimes they could immediately get to three, depending on the severity of their actions.

    The thing that I need to look at are my consequences- it's like warning, call the parent, then the recess/warning notice. So I'd like to know your plan and consequences- and if they work really well.

    One thing, too- We only have recess once a week- on Fridays.
     
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  3. TeachinHicks

    TeachinHicks Comrade

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    Jul 26, 2009

    We have a school wide one we have to follow by flipping cards, they use the same system from K though, so by the time they get to me they really understand the system
     
  4. ktshafra

    ktshafra Rookie

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    Jul 26, 2009

    We use Rick Morris' "Making Better Choices" slip. I typically give a warning and if the rule is broken or the behavior continues, I tell the student to "Pull a pink slip" and he or she knows what to do. They fill out the "Making Better Choices" with their name, date, number, and check off the rule they broke. There's a box for students/teacher to write a comment on the back if desired. I then make a copy of the slip and send it home to be signed and returned. If a student gets three slips in a week, he/she has a "time out," which at our school is 15 minutes taken off of playtime at lunch.

    The Pink/ "Making Better Choices" slips seem to really work well. I like that the students are responsible for filling it out as it gives them the opportunity to reflect on their actions. The other 4th grade teacher at my school wasn't so good about keeping up with the Pink slips, but had them sit out at recess if they missed an assignment. I was the opposite (good with slips, bad with sitting out recess) and for some students the Pink slips had a lessened effect. Because of this, I'm planning on being more consistent with sitting out recess on every Pink slip. The number of Pink slips directly effects their Responsible Behavior grade at the end of each trimester too.
     
  5. wildcat82

    wildcat82 Rookie

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    Jul 26, 2009

    Wow you have heard of Rick Morris too! He is totally amazing. I was lucky enough to go to one of his seminars when I taught in LA. I actually remember him talking about the pink slips. Thanks for the reminder!!
     
  6. ktshafra

    ktshafra Rookie

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    Yeah, I love so many of his ideas. I only instituted a couple of his tips last year but hope/plan to include more this year. :)
     
  7. Loomistrout

    Loomistrout Devotee

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    Jul 27, 2009

    Going public in any form - names-on-board, charts, cards - is risky. Good kids don't need these systems and chronic behavior kids have known them since kindergarten. Going public not only involves the victim but also the peer group. Once the peer group is involved all kinds of things can spin off like name calling, snickering. To save face many students will act out as revenge directed at the teacher for embarrassing them in front of peers.

    Any worthwhile management system can be identified by a measurement of effectiveness -- doe's it self-eliminate? If public names, revoking recess, office referrals, calling parents are truly the state of art in discipline management how come so many teachers rely on them the first week of school, weeks after, and last week of school? If these systems are so effective the teacher should be working her/himself out of using them after training the class. If you were to walk into a teacher's classroom in November and still see names-on-board something is amiss.

    Consider: The correct management system to use is the one you use less and less until it goes away because the kids have learned their lesson and don't try any more.
     
  8. Ms.Jasztal

    Ms.Jasztal Maven

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    Jul 27, 2009

    What do you use? I'd like to know. That's why I'm here asking... I know it's not the greatest plan, though people have used it. What about the moving up and down idea- that will not work, either?

    I teach my students NEVER to snicker or degrade their classmates, too, and 95% of the time, we are fine in a sense.

    If a student chooses to not show the greatest of respect in November, it does not mean the teacher is not teaching effectively or not using the greatest of systems. Perhaps the child is the type of student who shows attention-grabbing behaviors, no matter what type of discipline is used in the classroom. Perhaps the child has shown attention-grabbing behaviors since kindergarten and has become conditioned to it. Again, I'd like to know.
     
  9. Ms.Jasztal

    Ms.Jasztal Maven

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    Jul 27, 2009

    Loomistrout-

    I have scanned a few of your posts regarding management, and I would like to "pick your brain". 90% of the time, my students do extremely well. For the past three years, I have not used a system where I have written student names on the board, though my first year it seemed to work exceptionally well. I was seeking something different for this coming year that lets students know expectations, but at the same time lets them know when they are off-task. It had been used in my internship class, and it seemed feasible at the time.

    I have seen that you utilize Fred Jones' methods. I viewed this file- http://www.fredjones.com/Title-One-Preview/ToolsForTeaching.pdf when coming across his domain in a recent search. I also viewed these videos- http://www.youtube.com/user/KidVisionAZ and http://www.youtube.com/user/rachelernst . When you began utilizing his methods, was it a challenge for you or not difficult to grasp? You had mentioned in a thread that I came across that you were once a teacher who tried to correlate with the popular vote in your first few years of teaching. You let your students chew gum or sit on their desks next to friends before you came across Fred Jones' workshops and altered your management plan.

    What do you do when your students are off-task? It has to come at some point and time during the school year because a) The student is feeling exhausted or overwhelmed, b) His parent's imprisonment is on his mind more so than your instruction, or c) He is seeking his classmates' attention. You have reviewed your procedures, posted them, and the student decides to challenge no matter what. In my classes of 20 students (approximately) over the course of the past five years, some student (1 or possibly 2) have sat in each classroom. Of course I instructed them well and they learned to march to a new tune by the end of the school year, but it took some extra efforts to get him or her there.

    Hopefully I am not rambling. I always seek the best for my students and what makes them feel valued in my classroom. I equate that value to their self-worth, the way they learn to approach situations, and academic growth. Your answer interests me. I never want to feel like I am doing any detriment or anything "wrong"- I want to feel like I mean business and my students know my exact expectations for behavior.
     
  10. Loomistrout

    Loomistrout Devotee

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    Jul 27, 2009

    If you want quick and cheap... showy programs that start out great but lead you back to square one ...stay away from Jones. His program actually trains you in making discipline a non-issue. If you walk into a Jones' trained teacher's classroom you are likely to see a bunch of kids working and a teacher sort of moving around and not doing much. Absence of any names, cards, charts, reprimanding will make one think how lucky this teacher is to get all the good kids.

    Using Jones' methods is actually quite easy. Many teachers use them instinctively without realizing. The difficult part is letting go of old habits that we have used for years. Example: In training teachers take turns role-playing their worst nightmare student - verbally assaulting their partner with everything from screaming refusals to all kinds of profanity. Now here's the big technique to counter the student's assault ... DO NOTHING. We are not talking ignore. Ignoring doesn't work with discipline. It has to do with 99% body language that signals who is in control of the situation. Essentially you are practicing at the workshops and follow-up training to remain calm when your biology says DO SOMETHING-NOW! Jones' methods are based on one simple truth, "Calm is strength while upset is weakness." It took me four seminars and about a year and a half to get Jones' methods nailed most of the time. Again, it has to do with managing yourself.

    When students are off task I try to get them back on task. The difference is I use my body not my mouth. It's from Jones' training, Limit Setting, which is a private way of ensuring work while eliminating learned helplessness (attention seeking). Done correctly, the only ones in the room realizing a discipline number is being performed are the teacher and the target student.

    Most management problems can be traced back to a lack of Structure. Structure has to do with things the teacher can do before the students show up like furniture arrangement to how the teacher greets the students the first minute of the school year to teaching one's rules and routines. The key is "teaching" one's R&Rs. This is a far cry from announcing one's R&Rs. Announcing one's R&Rs signals they are not that important to the teacher. If they were the teacher would spend more time like when teaching a regular lesson. And if they are not that important to the teacher R&Rs won't be that important to the students either. Announcing leads to chasing -- each and every day as rules and procedures are repeated until June.
     
  11. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    Jul 27, 2009

    I don't use an official plan. My children are divided into 3 groups (usually K-1, 2-3, 4-5) Each group has a mascot (buzzing bumblebees, sparkling superstars, rockin' rainbows). Each group earns tokens individually and as a group for positive actions. We keep a bulletin board to post tokens. At the end of the week the group with the most tokens gets to keep a spirit trophy on their table for the next week. We also post their group's name on our wall of honor.
    I rarely have to deal with negative behavior...the teacher glare usually works. Very poor behavior (I have furniture tossers, etc) are removed from the classroom for a cool down time.
     
  12. Ms.Jasztal

    Ms.Jasztal Maven

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    Jul 27, 2009

    Thank you for responding, Loomistrout. My respects.

    I am a teacher of respect, caring, professionalism, and integrity. I would never second-guess that in any respect. Honestly, the last thing I ever desire to do is humiliate or belittle a child (or at least intentionally). I did sit last night for a while and read Fred Jones' website as well as some resources that stem from the program. Body language is essential, and proximity (facing forward completely versus on an angle) does eliminate a number of problems from ever occurring. I have always been very good for walking around the classroom and teaching from all areas when instructing. When a student is off-task, I do move closer to them and perhaps nod slowly or stand directly in front or behind the student. It is incredible how in ways I have incorporated some aspects of the program without realizing.

    Now in my first year, I probably wouldn't have known about Jones. I knew about Harry Wong, obviously, and wrote out great procedures. When reviewing procedures, students practiced them over the course of the first week. We role-played situations and I set very high expectations that students would be self-sufficient, understanding, respectful and perform well academically. The only thing I look back now is the method I used for notifying students they weren't meeting expectations. It was not often I wrote names on the board; students thought out their actions and I employed proximity. Yet in retrospect, that's all I ever knew and we all make blunders- some catastrophic and some fixable. Our hindsight, of course, is very clear.

    I am all for going through with the program. I am not a cheap fix kind of person; I am an exceptionally diligent worker who researches, reads and tries new methods of teaching in my room all the time with my students. PAT will come easily to me because I already incorporate Jeopardy, academic baseball/football, and all other kinds of games. It's interesting, too, how PAT decreases transition times- I did the same to an extent last year in getting my students to line up efficiently. My twenty-one students, at the lowest, lined up in five seconds and I was immensely proud. Most of the time, they ranged between 6-10. A few times, they went above that, up to about 20-30 on a down day. I also did the same with cleaning up- they were at lowest at about a minute and a half, but I know I can get it even better. It is great how I can incorporate what I have used into a sensible, practical program.

    It is 100% common sense, and that's why I appreciated your post last night. It forced me to think twice, to delve into some tremendous resources that made great use of my late night Internet browsing.

    Additionally, I have seen the teachers who have reviewed straight through June, or announced rather. As Scholastic.com's grades 3-5 advisor this coming year, perhaps this is a way I can reach out to my fellow colleagues in adopting a fresh perspective on behavior management strategies.
     
  13. Bumble

    Bumble Groupie

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    Jul 28, 2009

    POSITIVE CONSEQUENCES:
    I'm going to use a token system. I'll have a class "store" and the kids can redeem their earned tickets every other Friday. Some of the items they can "buy" are candy, no homework passes, pencils, erasers, jump ropes, balls, etc...

    NEGATIVE CONSEQUENCES:
    1. Warning
    2. Removal from group/class
    3. Write the classroom norms
    4. Phone call home
    5. Lose of recess
    6. Detention

    I had furniture tossers last year. I made them pick up the chairs/tables as we waited for the school police.
     

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