Your best art project...

Discussion in 'General Education' started by heavens54, Feb 28, 2010.

  1. heavens54

    heavens54 Connoisseur

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    Feb 28, 2010

    What did you do?
     
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  3. Jem

    Jem Aficionado

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    Feb 28, 2010

    I love putting paper underneath the kids' desk and letting them paint like Michelangelo. Make sure to put tons of paint sheets down, and have the kids wear garbage bags to protect their clothing.
     
  4. Maxadoodle

    Maxadoodle Comrade

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    Feb 28, 2010

    Jackson Pollock inspired drip paintings. My preschoolers love it, and so did older kids when I did a volunteer thing in the classroom.
     
  5. Samothrace

    Samothrace Cohort

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    Feb 28, 2010

    depends on the grade and the class.

    I did a fantastic landscape mixed media collage with 7th graders. The results were amazing!

    My 6th graders are currently painting styrofoam heads using personal symbolism. These are turning out great!

    There's A Wocket in My Pocket with first grade, again they come up with fantastic ideas. We make model magic Seussian characters. I also just did a drawing lesson about the story The Dot..and had fantastic drawings completed when faced with a challenge of a dot already being on the paper.

    A clay project of any kind is always a success. Kids love clay!

    Color Mixing Chameleons with K.

    Cut Paper Complementary Color Collage with 4th grade. Another one I'm getting some beautiful results, and some hysterical ones as well.


    I could go on and on really.
     
  6. runsw/scissors

    runsw/scissors Phenom

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    Feb 28, 2010

    We practiced color mixing with frosting on cookies. I gave each group a small container of frosting mixed with food coloring (one of each red, blue, yellow) and we spread the frostings on cookies and placed them in a triad. Then we mixed the frostings to make secondary and triadary (I think that's what you call them) colors and placed the cookies on the desk to make a color wheel. They loved it!
     
  7. Samothrace

    Samothrace Cohort

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    Mar 1, 2010

    The primary colors are Red, Yellow, Blue.
    The Secondary colors are Orange, Green, Violet.
    The Tertiary or sometimes called Intermediate colors are a combo of the primary and secondary......yellow orange...yellow green...blue green...blue violet...red violet...red orange (primary color always listed first)
     
  8. Securis

    Securis Cohort

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    Things that I believe my students have enjoyed the most?

    Well, younger children always, always love to manipulate. I did this drawing transition to 3d with creatures as the theme. We drew imaginary creatures after a discussion of real versus imaginary and the different parts that any creature might have. After that everyone had a hand in creating a list of parts, then we drew the creature using all the items from the list plus anything that anyone wanted to add. You get some outrageous looking critters. If time runs long and they start to get restless, I ask them to name their creature and write a short story to tell everyone something about their creature.

    In a later lesson, we took pipe cleaners, pom-poms, wiggle eyes, buttons, and acrylic gems to make 3d creatures.

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    With another grade we did a cultural comparison of a universal symbol. I like dragons and it's pretty non-controversial. We looked at Eastern cultures' and then Western cultures' ideas about dragons in general. Then we did a construction paper mosaic choosing one style or the other with acrylic gems and glitter added for embellishment. Boy, how they love glitter! What a mess!

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    QFT!

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    One that always turns out nice is Color schemes using crossed-over student silhouettes on banner paper. It runs long and it takes some extra motivation to keep them going but it's fun.

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    I love the results on an X-Ray style bark painting simulation using copies of fish skeletons. The kids usually dig it and the results actually look like natural native hands have done the work.

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    QFT, again!
     
  9. KinderCowgirl

    KinderCowgirl Phenom

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    I love letting them use pasta - we make storytelling belts with the already colored shells at Thanksgiving time and then in the spring for our insect unit I get all shapes and sizes and they invent their own insects making a model with the pasta. When they paint them bright colors it's really cool.

    Jem-I love that Michelangelo idea.
     
  10. wrice

    wrice Habitué

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    I've had kids do science projects on 2x2 drop-ceiling tiles. They bring them home and paint them in a science topic that interests them. I have the kids incorporate an elaborate title, a picture element (like a diagram), and a word element (like a definition.) I removed the 2x4 ceiling tiles and replaced them with the kids'. Worked well until the fire marshal came and made me get rid of them.

    We've also made dinosaur quilts to donate to the local children's hospital to give to "frequent flier" patients. Each kid gets a fabric square and uses cloth markers to draw a particular dinosaur. They then research about the animal and make an info page. I bind the info pages into a book, and sew together (w/ parent volunteer help) the fabric into a nice quilt. The children's hospital usually has lots of quilts stereotypically for girls, but few quilts for boys, and this dinosaur theme with the accompanying book is often neater for the little guys.

    We do cut paper flower diagrams; kids make fanciful eyeglasses projects fictiously using radio waves, x-rays, gamma rays etc. to change the way they see the world in some way; they design, draw, and tell a story about their own invented dinosaur using Greek and Latin word roots (unipodogymnocephalosaurus is a one footed bald headed lizard that hops around and stuns its prey with reflected sunlight...), we draw with silver nitrate and develop it in the sun, we draw with potassium nitrate and burn out the lines; the kids etch glass ornaments for the holidays using Elmer's glue as the resist and Armour etch. what else...
     
  11. sue35

    sue35 Habitué

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    Mar 2, 2010

    Wrice where did you get these ideas? I teach 5th science and am always looking for things like these to do:)
     
  12. wrice

    wrice Habitué

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    Mar 2, 2010

    awh thanks! some are labs from college days, others are kind of like the "iron chef" shows where they're assigned an ingredient and have to make something from it- how to make a lesson with the materials at hand! I've always been weird and creative so my lessons tend to show that.
     

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