You'll get much more respect as a regular teacher.....NOT!

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by Davidfizix, Nov 1, 2009.

  1. mmswm

    mmswm Moderator

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    Nov 23, 2009

    Also stay away from wording such as he is disrespectful and disruptive. Tell her an this day he made a face and a remark, and on that day he made this remark, and yadda yadda yadda, and the behavior is disruptive and disrepsectful. It's a slight difference in wording, but since you have a snarky parent, it might be your only hope. The claws are going to come out if she thinks you're calling her child names (wether he deserves it or not).
     
  2. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Nov 23, 2009

    Good. And try to paraphrase the remakr, instead of calling it "snide."

    Volume in on your side. One or two instances are one thing, but it's hard to argue a whole litany of offenses.
     
  3. CindyBlue

    CindyBlue Cohort

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    Nov 24, 2009

    "We have a new principal and one thing I love about him is this plan:
    Teachers are paid to teach, not to deal with disruptive students and to chase skipping students. If we have a student being a 'jerk', we call the office and say we need him for a student, he's there in less that 3 minutes, we point the student out and he takes the student away. We continue with class. I had to do this once. The student came back and didn't exhibit the behavior he did again-and this was in a 9th grade class. I'm not sure what the principal said to the student, but whatever it was worked."
    I love this guy! We need more courageous principals like him!
     
  4. Cerek

    Cerek Aficionado

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    Nov 24, 2009

    I would never use the word "snide" in a parent/teacher conference. I just used it here as a descriptive adjective. I do agree with the advice about labeling his behavior as disruptive rather than the child himself. I began making my list of his offences last night and currently have 2.5 pages already. I've also kept a daily log as part of my student teaching assignment, so I will be able to back up these incidents with specific dates.

    I spoke with my principal this morning and told him about the conference. He agreed he should be involved and suggested even bringing the counselor in as well. Our principal is a trained counselor himself and is very good at diffusing confrontations. He addresses the actions directly, but objectively, while always pointing out our ultimate goal is to find a positive solution for the situation. I told him about my list of incidents and he suggested covering the 3 worst incidents in detail and simply pointing out there were several additional events. If we covered every one, the meeting would last all day.

    I'll fine tune my list and fill in the dates I have missing. I feel very prepared for the meeting and I appreciate all the tips and suggestions. I will remember to keep my language objective and focus only on the facts of each incident. I'll leave judgement to the parents.
     

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