you lost my paper!

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by Kenz501, Dec 2, 2017.

  1. Always__Learning

    Always__Learning Comrade

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    And that is where give and take comes in :) A teacher shares something I need with me (their expertise) and I share my ear so they can vent. But I think this misses the point: my point is that we have to engage in ongoing learning with whatever we have available to us as teachers. So I would really encourage you to think - what are my top 5 issues in my class right now? If you could identify those you could probably have a better plan by Monday than you have now.
     
  2. Kenz501

    Kenz501 Cohort

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    Well...my students think I'm incompetent, I guess; why else would they keep accusing me of losing their papers and such? Why else would a "good kid" talk to me so rudely when he / she doesn't get his / her way? I don't really know how to deal with that, but the whole "you lost my paper" thing is getting on my nerves. I don't even want anyone to imagine that I'm that incompetent. I've put up with worse accusations at the youth center, and it was a lot worse because they believed the kids and often didn't even listen to my side of the story, but it's still aggravating, regardless of how harmless a form it takes.

    I don't know how to explain things so that kids understand.

    I'm still a little lost on how to take standards, a textbook page, and a fun activity and make an engaging lesson out of all of it. I've come up with things that have confused kids more times than I want to list, and I don't want to go back to that.

    I'm also just not clear on how to meet my boss's expectations during the evaluation that's coming up, and it's making me a bit nervous. It seems simple enough, but I can't even stay two weeks ahead in planning. I want to plan out my whole year so that I know what I'm doing, but I don't think I can because no one will help me understand what I'm supposed to be doing.

    I started this thread just for tips on how to help the kids realize that I did not misplace their papers. This all feels a little off-topic.
     
  3. Always__Learning

    Always__Learning Comrade

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    So when I read your post I wonder if any of these resonate for you:
    - You need a good organization system for papers
    - You need to have clear routines in your classroom
    - You need to build relationships with your kids where they feel you are fair and consistent in discipline
    - You need good planning skills (by the way I'd never suggest planning the whole year - long range sure but not detailed planning)
    - You need to be able to explain things in a way that is accessible to kids
     
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  4. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

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    I am an AR teacher who worked full time, took classes to meet state certification as well as diving into PD. No one said it would be easy, so there was no one to blame or lean on. I watched my colleagues like a hawk, trying to be fairly self sufficient. When I could contribute digital media skills to teachers lacking that skill set, it felt good to be giving back instead of simply one sided taking.

    If you are, in fact, on the spectrum, you need to reach out to some of the links on another thread you started. We don't have magic bullets, just experience often learned the hard way. If you need help, find someone to pay to help you. That should be a school or university familiar with your deficits, a personal organizer, a form of person trainer to help you see the world more through the eyes of your colleagues. If all else fails, quit and see if you can get more work as a sub while you figure this out. Your students deserve a teacher who is ready to teach.

    I know how hard it is for those on the spectrum to deal with personal interactions, but the sad truth is that each successful person with Asperger's, etc., struggles and finds paths that work "for them." The spectrum is not a one size fits all kind of diagnosis. I have a family member who probably has similar deficits as you, but he has worked tirelessly to find out what works for him. How long to that permanent, successful job, outside of the university? Six years of hard work lots of self doubt. I don't know about your extended family, but the saving grace for this young man was a parent who never gave up, never accepted less than a personal best. Note that I did not say perfection - but rather, personal best - the best he could possibly do. I don't know how this meshes with your life, but your other threads suggest that you could benefit from mental health counseling. They might be able to help you find the help you need.
     
  5. CharRMS

    CharRMS Companion

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    Dec 2, 2017

    Create a specific spot and container that is meant for students turning in their work. I have one for each of my class blocks and they are color coded. Practice the procedure of where to turn in assignments with your students, then move to simply reminding your students where to turn in their work, and then after that expect students to turn their work into that one spot each time you tell them or they know it's time to turn in assignments.

    After your students have turned in their work, go to that bin and use a list where you can attach it to the front of the stack, and on the paper have the assignment name, date, each student name, and a place to mark if the student turned in their assignment; this gives you the record of who turned in the assignment and who was absent. Binder clip those assignments together and don't unclip them until you are ready to grade them; put those papers in your designated spot for papers to be graded. Lately, I have the binder clip on the top if I need to grade the papers and then move it to the side if they are graded and just need to be put in the gradebook. After the papers are graded and ready to be given back, they go into the return bin. If a student tells you that they turned in their assignment, you will be able to look at your sheet and be sure if they did or not. Also, have a place in your classroom specifically for no name papers that students can easily see, and if you know they didn't turn in assignment, point them toward the no name place and then have them look in their binder, book, backpack, etc. Most of the time they end up finding their assignment somewhere in their things.

    When it comes to kids losing copies of assignments, I have a basket where I keep extra copies and they are free to look in there for another copy. Sometimes I'll run off another or sometimes I have them get a copy and copy down the worksheet on their own paper.

    For classroom mangagement, figure out what you expect from your students and create your classroom management plan around those expectations. Figure out how you want students to do tasks in the classroom and create a procedure for each one of those things. Turning in papers, getting out of their seats, etc. Figure out your consequences for not meeting your expectations.

    I'm on my 3rd year in 7th grade, and I struggle with attendance too; not so much for my homeroom class and for the office, but in my individual classes. For the office, get in a routine of what you do in the morning and that will hopefully help you remember to take attendance. For the classroom, use a seating chart to your advantage. Find a way to remind yourself to look at the empty seats in your room and use the seating chart to see who isn't in your room.

    For morning work, create a designated spot in your classroom for students to pick up their morning work. I have a weekly sheet that I set out on the cart on Monday; the kids go pick up a new copy and then they know the sheet is due on Friday. Let the kids take some responsibility for helping you run the classroom smoothly. Most 7th graders still love helping teachers in some way.

    Teaching is hard work especially the first year because a lot of it is learning as you go and figuring out how to run your own classroom. It does become a little easier though. Figure out those expectations and procedures and EXPECT and REQUIRE your students to follow the expectations and procedures and everything else will start falling into place.
     
  6. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    My cooperating teacher had this DOWN PAT. She had a rolling cabinet with ten drawers, with five different colors, two drawers per color. Each class knew their color (to the point I still think think of the students by Red Class, Green Class, etc) and knew assignments had to go into that color top drawer. Any assignments not marked with a name stayed in that drawer, untouched, until the student took ownership of it by signing it. Graded assignments would always be in the bottom drawer at the beginning of each class to be handed out by the teacher (so students couldn't take each other's work).

    This is what I'm talking about.
    [​IMG]
     
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  7. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

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    Dec 3, 2017

    I do not normally lose papers but students do, and I understand what you mean when you say it falls on you even if it's initially their fault. It is bothersome to keep going back and reprinting an assignment, or emailing parents to tell them when their child needs to do to get incomplete work finished.

    When work is handed to me, I immediately put a binder clip on them to make sure nothing slips out. The problem is when a student hands me something late (maybe they weren't quite finished with the worksheet and finish 10 minutes later) I have to remember to put it into the same pile. I've made a concentrated effort to do that, but I think that having a turn-in bin for any late assignments might help with that too.

    It's not bad to have students keep their work but it makes it harder to grade. If you're just doing participation/completion points, it's easy enough to just glance at a notebook and see if it's done. It takes me a lot longer to grade something in a notebook.

    Also you might consider making more digital assignments if possible. That way nothing can get lost.
     
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  8. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

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    I have had kids tell me that I lost their paper. I always tell them that I did not lose their paper. I know this because I keep them all together. Therefore, I would have lost ALL of the papers from that class.

    Students turn in work in a box specific to their class. I take them from that box and put them in my "to grade" folder for that class. They don't go with me out of the classroom. They don't go anywhere else.

    Usually when I press them further, we find out that one of the following applies. 1. They didn't put their name on it. They find it in the "no name" box. 2. They didn't turn it in. They find it in their binder. They didn't do it. 3. They put it in the wrong place. "But I put it on your desk." That might be true, but that is not where they go. So, I didn't get it.
     
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  9. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

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    There are plenty of people who are willing to help new teachers. I've worked as a mentor teacher many times. I'm considered to be very routine-oriented and organized. People will ask me about things that I do, and I'll let them ask questions or observe my class.

    I'll tell you, though, that sometimes I just stop offering help when it is always met with a negative attitude. "I can't do that." "That won't work for me." "I prefer to do it this way." Well, then do it your way and quit asking me for help.

    I have noticed that sometimes you don't like the answers that you get when you post questions here. We are trying to help. You are the only person who can fix your issues. Others can offer suggestions that work for them. It is up to YOU to make those changes work for your situation. If you don't like them, that's fine, too. You don't have to use them.
     
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  10. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Fanatic

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    As far as observation is concerned, what model does your district use? Danielson, Stronge, Marzano, Marshall?
     
  11. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Fanatic

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    Have you read any books to fill in some gaps? Teach like a Champion comes to mind.
     
  12. Kenz501

    Kenz501 Cohort

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    I'm really not sure. How would I find that information out? I just moved to this state; I'm new to the school district.
     
  13. Kenz501

    Kenz501 Cohort

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    I'm trying to take her advice; she advised me to cut out games and gimmicks if they weren't necessary components of instruction. I started the year with a call-and-response-based teaching method and "behavior scoreboard" system that would reward the kids for participation and good behavior, but I was warned that I might have management problems if I kept it, so I scrapped it. No one told me what to replace it with, so I reverted back to just teaching out of the textbook and doing a lot of paper-and-pencil activities. Being a new teacher, I don't really know what activities qualify as "absolutely necessary components of instruction," so I've been very careful to do just what I've been told, or what I think I've been told, and not try a lot of new things. The kids are bored, and I'm getting some behavior problems as a result. I'm not really sure what to do about said behavior problems, and I think it's pretty unfair that they left me hanging after telling me to scrap the system I was already using.

    Of course, I was having trouble keeping up with things, and it was probably good advice. I didn't want them to get used to being rewarded for good behavior they should display anyway, but I'm not happy I can no longer rely on peer pressure to get the whole group to behave like quiet little church mice.

    The system I was using was strictly for learning engagement and promoting student interactivity, but I almost feel like I need to have the activities I try with the kids "approved" by the more experienced teachers, because I don't want them to feel like I'm not taking their advice.
     
  14. Kenz501

    Kenz501 Cohort

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    I want to run most of my decisions through her to make sure they make sense, like allowing the kids to keep their papers in their notebooks and just checking them there. She'll probably tell me that it's not a good idea, because it will teach them to be lazy and make more work for me, and she's a more experienced teacher, so she's probably right.

    I've been very careful with the papers, though. I keep them together, keep them all in my "to grade" folder, and often don't let things leave the classroom. When they do leave the classroom, they are in a folder, not loose, so it would be difficult to lose one and not all of them. I just can't verify whether a student has turned something in or not, and that leads to accusations that I lost the paper. It's pretty irritating; it's just something they know they can do. If they accuse me of losing the paper, I'll give them another one, and they won't have the responsibility of keeping up with their work. My executive functioning skills are not that good, and since I don't have a fool-proof way of showing the student that I did not lose his / her paper, I usually give in to the student's request. I hate doing this, though, because it's like me admitting that I've lost the student's paper, even when I most likely did not do so.

    I mentioned earlier, too, that I have trouble keeping up with student attendance. It's especially aggravating when a student has to leave early or attend an extracurricular activity, because when I check the roll to see if he / she is missing work, it will say that the child is present, because I have to take roll at the beginning of class. That means if the kid misses an assignment that I give at the end of class, I'll be missing another assignment, and the kid will probably accuse me of losing his / her paper again...
     
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2017
  15. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Dec 3, 2017

    Kenzi. Youve got A LOT of active threads. And you seem to not be putting too much advice onto serious action. And you confinue to make excises about being Aspergers. There are many sucessful teachers figting private battles and challenges. What sill you fo TOMORROW to make a change in your classroom?
     

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