"You don't act right"

Discussion in 'Preschool' started by MissMav, Aug 28, 2012.

  1. MissMav

    MissMav Rookie

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2011
    Messages:
    36
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 28, 2012

    Well, let me tell you, flat out, my preschoolers are rude, disrespectful, and nasty.

    They kick, punch, and will hurt each other intentionally. When I'm speaking to one, another will be smirking behind me.

    One will tattle to get the other in trouble, just for the pure joy of it.

    Today, after having a discussion of how to start off my new year, which starts Tuesday, after a 10-week summer youth academy, which has had the "pleasure" of having teens angering my kids and acting as wanna-be teachers, my boss would like me to focus two weeks on respect.

    HA! Right. Respect. Sure. So, I've been googling this subject for 2 hours and everything I'm finding, I picture a sweet as sugar classroom where there's 10 perfect little kids sitting quietly at circle time.

    That's not what I have. I have 14 children who poke, wrestle on, climb on furniture, kick, punch each other etc. My circle time is wasted 15 minutes waiting for them to just sit down and put a bubble in their mouths.

    Today, I had a child say to me "you don't act right". This was AFTER he punched my hand because he had rudely taken a hula-hoop from another child and I was pointing out to him there were 4 others available.

    Any ideas of how I can write week 2 and 3's lesson plans regarding respect?
     
  2.  
  3. Rebel1

    Rebel1 Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2008
    Messages:
    1,522
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 29, 2012

    How about getting them involved in making some class goals and giving them some incentives?
    I copied the Golden Rule for my Pre-K class, and they are learning it. It is what we live by, and I keep reminding them about making the right choices. It has done wonders!
    I worded it as "Treat others the way you want to be treated!"
    Rebel1
     
  4. MissMav

    MissMav Rookie

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2011
    Messages:
    36
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 29, 2012

    I can run that by my boss. The center has "expectations" that are the same in each room. I am not allowed to have my own classroom rules.

    One expectation is: listen to staff and follow directions.

    3 year olds don't know what staff is. I replaced it with teacher, because they know that word, and got my rear handed to me on a nice silver plater when the uppers heard that. It's staff. Live it, love it, deal with it. Staff is a HUGE word, teacher is not.

    But if I can have my own classroom rule that abides the Golden Rule, that could work.
     
  5. Rebel1

    Rebel1 Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2008
    Messages:
    1,522
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 29, 2012

    Is it a Christian center?
    Rebel1
     
  6. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2006
    Messages:
    9,154
    Likes Received:
    1

    Aug 29, 2012

    You are likely gonna have to focus on a lesson about one concrete behavior at a time. Respect is such an abstract term that I can't imagine that age having an easy time grasping it. You can use the word in conjunction but not as a whole big word by itself. Have lessons on sharing, why hitting is not nice, etc. Give them time with each topic. Not just one lesson. Reinforce it. Make it a big deal. Play it up. That doesn't mean you won't have consequences for other risky behaviors but if sharing is your lesson for the next 2 weeks, you teach the heck out of it, reward the heck out of them, give examples, give multiple lessons, etc.
     
  7. LovetoteachPREK

    LovetoteachPREK Companion

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2011
    Messages:
    197
    Likes Received:
    11

    Aug 30, 2012

    I have been there. Maybe not to the extreme you have, but I have had preschoolers with zero sense of social skills.

    Google PBIS and the Center for Social Emotional Health. Lots of good ideas on there. There is a story about a turtle that talks about how we need to go into our "shell" when we get angry with others. There are also some posters for teaching problem solving skills (i.e. not tattling or hitting.)

    You can do lots of homemade social stories about how we treat our friends, how we do not hit, how we sit in a circle, how we stand in line, etc. Take pictures of your students in your classroom to illustrate the stories. Its especially good if you can get a "naughty" one in a picture doing the right thing. Then you say "Look, Tommy is sitting in the circle with his hands in his lap!"

    Make everything about reinforcing good social behavior. Put up a card, or a die cut with good things students do socially (Jack helped Tim pick up the blocks, etc.) Make a big deal about putting it up, and reading it often.

    There are lots of books on the subject (the above website lists tons.)

    Try fingerplays and songs to keep their hands busy at every moment!

    Good luck! It's not impossible. It just takes all your energy. I think your boss is right. Pretty much all your lessons need to be about respect until they get some of the concepts down. Otherwise, you will spend the whole year accomplishing nothing.
     
  8. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Aficionado

    Joined:
    May 29, 2007
    Messages:
    3,061
    Likes Received:
    538

    Aug 30, 2012

    :confused: They are 4-year-olds. Of course they lack social skills. It's our job to teach them those skills. Focus on modeling, role playing and doing a lot of 1-1 instruction on this!
     
  9. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2006
    Messages:
    9,154
    Likes Received:
    1

    Aug 31, 2012

    Another thing to think about is possibly adopting "Friend" language, if you don't use it already. Use it in all contexts possible. This won't substitute for lessons, but it makes the thought of friends pervasive throughout the day.

    "It's our friend Johnny's turn to change the weather frog. Johnny, can you come up here please."

    "Let's say hello to our friend, Principal Jackson."

    "Johnny, are you remembering to share with your friend Sally?"

    "Friends, what do we do before we eat?" (wash hands).

    I've even seen a school that uses it when talking with other adults, including parents. "Thank you for letting me know that. Please excuse me, I can see a friend (student) that needs me."

    When I borrowed a book from another teacher, I pointed out that teachers share too. That's what good friends do.

    Make it an everyday part of your language. Model it. Point it out. Fit it with the lessons you teach.

    When you play a game, talk about turn taking. "Now it is our friend, Suzy's turn. Suzy, please [insert whatever the game needs her to do]."

    "Are we being good friends when we do [insert behavior]?"

    "Yay Johnny, you are being a great friend today. You helped your friend Suzy clean up her blocks."

    Use a positive, perky, thrilled to be good friends tone.

    In the beginning you will need to have lots of lessons but that shouldn't stop you from teaching it all day long through modeling, praising and using friend language.
     
  10. mandijyn

    mandijyn Rookie

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2009
    Messages:
    50
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 31, 2012

    Try having them "tattle" when someone does something kind! They may love the positive attention it brings them . It could really catch on.
     
  11. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2006
    Messages:
    27,534
    Likes Received:
    6

    Aug 31, 2012

    I just read in another post that MissMav has resigned from this job and found another.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. carlstensfer102,
  2. Behis1995
Total: 304 (members: 3, guests: 262, robots: 39)
test