Yet another question...High school special education?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by lothia_man, Apr 28, 2009.

  1. lothia_man

    lothia_man Rookie

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    Apr 28, 2009

    What do they have to do? Do the teenagers have to pass standardized test?
     
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  3. Bored of Ed

    Bored of Ed Enthusiast

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    Apr 28, 2009

    I believe that most do have to take standardized tests, except the more severely disabled, similar to elementary school. I haven't actually taught Sp.Ed at the high school level, though. Testing accommodations are usually granted but not always so helpful -- things like extra time or a reader/scribe.

    Besides the more severely disabled children, very many special ed students get thrown into high school pretty much the same way as everyone else, just without the skills and tools to cope with it. They suddenly have a zillion subjects and teachers with higher expectations than they're used to. This is no offense against high school teachers; it's just that with so many students, switching every 40 minutes or so, the teachers might not realize the child's needs unless someone is very proactive.

    I think middle schools tend to hit kids the same way, just a little less, so that should be some preparation for high.

    I'm talking here about your general LD population; kids with different kinds of impairments may stay on in self-contained programs more similar to what they were in beforehand. But I think at the middle/high school level there is more of a push for inclusion and mainstreaming for kids who have any possibility of handling it.
     
  4. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    Apr 28, 2009

    My son is graduating this year with a SPED diploma so we have been through every year with him. In my district in high school, the most severely disabled stay together as a group in SPED classes. They take different assessments and train either vocationally or with life skills. The less severely disabled will go to regular classes and will usually have an aid in the classroom. They take standardized tests with some modifications.
     

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