Year 2 for AYP..what does this mean for me?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Teacherella, Aug 10, 2009.

  1. Teacherella

    Teacherella Habitué

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2006
    Messages:
    769
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 10, 2009

    What does it mean for me as a new teacher if a school is on Year 2 of not meeting AYP for 2008-2009? I was offered a self-contained special education teaching job so our test standards will be modified, but I'm still concerned about job security. I know if a school has 2 full years of not meeting AYP, parents have to be notified and have a choice whether or not to ask for their child to be transferred into a different school (district pays for it). At Year 6, they will become a public charter school and restaffing would be done (for those who were accountable for the lack of progress).

    Is this something I need to be concerned about? I know the firing and rehiring of staff doesn't happen until Year 6 of not meeting AYP. I do have another job offer in the works with a different county that has consecutively made AYP every year. Would this be a big enough reason for you to choose another job offer? Thanks.
     
  2.  
  3. Ms.Jasztal

    Ms.Jasztal Maven

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2005
    Messages:
    5,363
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 10, 2009

    It wouldn't be a huge reason for me, honestly, but it is always something to be concerned about. If you are a sensational teacher with very high goals for your students, your school really needs your expertise for your students to perform highly on standardized testing. :)

    Year 2 is not something to be extremely concerned about, though... so don't worry.
     
  4. multilingual

    multilingual Rookie

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2009
    Messages:
    18
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 12, 2009

    I work with underperforming schools on an every day basis who are beyond year six in program improvement and the school has not been converted to charter and no one has been fired. The school has had to restructure it's schedule and make different changes to its practices, but that's about it. Be the best you can be, make sure that you have all of your certificates, such as English learner authorization, and you should be fine.
     
  5. ESteacher

    ESteacher Rookie

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2009
    Messages:
    22
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 12, 2009

    yuck. just thinking about AYP makes me sick.

    I wouldnt worry much about it either... just be prepared to do a lot of extra paper work.
     
  6. ahsila

    ahsila Companion

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2005
    Messages:
    206
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 12, 2009

    It's not likely that you will lose your job if the school fails to make AYP this year. Honestly - it's getting to a point where NCLB will have to have some MAJOR modifications because the %age of students expected to be proficient is getting high enough that even "good" schools are starting to struggle.
    On another note - my school has been on a plan of improvement for our special education subgroup - and I can tell you that as a SpEd teacher, you will be held accountable for IEP kids even if they never step into your classroom. I am currently in this battle with admin - my resource kids that don't meet standard has decreased by 10% each year I've been here (so technically resource students made AYP under Safe Harbor), but the subgroup as a whole still isn't making it. They don't seem to understand that coming down on me about scores for kids that I don't teach makes no sense. Hopefully you won't be in the same situation since you will have a self contained class, but as a voice of experience, don't be surprised if you are expected to have answers for any SpEd kid that doesn't make it.
     
  7. Rockguykev

    Rockguykev Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2008
    Messages:
    1,934
    Likes Received:
    257

    Aug 12, 2009

    Don't worry at all. Many schools haven't met AYP yet, period. I imagine this year with the huge score requirement jump most won't. In two years, when it jumps again, none will.

    As far as the "at 6 years a charter takes over" comment I'd love to know what state that is. If it was California we'd have half the state under charter already.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. CaliforniaRPCV
Total: 316 (members: 2, guests: 291, robots: 23)
test