WWYD as the teacher or the parent?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Jerseygirlteach, Mar 7, 2015.

  1. Jerseygirlteach

    Jerseygirlteach Groupie

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    In my kids' middle school, they have one quarter of computers/technology every year. My daughter has computers this quarter. The computer teacher has worked in the school district for over 50 years and is 78 years old. I don't hold any of that against her at all, but, in general, I'm frustrated when I hear how little gets done in her class. Actually, I'm frustrated by a lot of things that happen at their school, but anyway...

    At the middle school, the 8th graders took the PARCC exam this week. The 7th graders are taking it next week, and the 6th graders are taking it the following week. Because it is computer-based, the school has decided to use the computers in the computer labs to administer the test. This means that the computers will not be available during my daughter's computer class for 3 weeks. The computer teacher brought them to another classroom and told them that since there are no computers in the classroom, they can just "hang out" and consider it a free period. For three weeks?!?! Out of a 2 1/2 month marking period, they're supposed to just do nothing for one period a day for 3 weeks? I'm livid.

    Am I being unfair? She is a computer teacher and there won't be any access to computers. Is it really fair that I expect her to do something with them that has value given the circumstances? Believe me, I'm frustrated with the district too, but realistically, I know that they cannot go out and buy computers for every student just for this absurd test.

    What would you do if you were this teacher? Would you try to teach them something other than computers or would you do what she's doing?

    And if you were me, would you complain to admin? Like I said, she's been teaching there for 50 years. I'm not going to get her "in trouble."
     
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  3. hernandoreading

    hernandoreading Comrade

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    Three weeks of time to "hang out" is ridiculous. Perhaps the teacher is frustrated because her entire class has been pushed to the side, but this is not the kids' fault. I would ask the teacher about it first, then go from there.
     
  4. a2z

    a2z Virtuoso

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    Why don't you talk to the teacher first before going over her head?

    You have a valid complaint that the class computers are being used for testing with no real educational substitute for the students who are missing class instruction during times they aren't taking tests. However, other than voice that complaint, there isn't much more you could say to admin that isn't reporting a problem with the teacher. The teacher may not be fired or even get anything put in her file, but the intent is to tell on the teacher. There is no way around it. That is what you are talking about doing. I

    I know it doesn't sit well because no one likes a complaint about what they are doing, but it is rather problematic to be on that parent side of the table when what you really need to do because you know going to the 78 year old teacher about providing lessons to the students even if they don't have computers will produce any real learning for the kids in the next few weeks. If that was important to the teacher, she would have figured out something by now.

    So there you have it. You either have to side with the teacher in you or side with the parent in you knowing your child is sitting for about 3 weeks getting no instruction. Kind of sucks because it kind of feels hypocritical, doesn't it. It is one of the reasons I tend to try to point out multiple sides of things in discussions because perspective sheds a different light on situations.
     
  5. bros

    bros Phenom

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    The teacher could at least teach about the history of computers, talk about the parts of a computer - there's a bit you can learn about computers without actually being on a computer
     
  6. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    PAARC is causing a lot of programs to be compromised. In my school the computer lab is closed for 3 weeks. And the library too. Kids can't check out books but the lbrarian comes to classrooms and reads to them or uses smart boards for lessons. We have laptop carts but if they aren't being used for testing they are signed out for test prep. Other than kids bringing their own technology in the OP situation I'm not quite sure what a tech teacher would be doing if there's no other technology available (smart boards, iPads, laptop carts?)
     
  7. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    There are tech standards students K-8 are supposed to be learning, though. And the lack of access to technology is going to cause an impediment to those standards being met.

    There are 'technology citizenship' standards that could be covered at this time, but I doubt it's enough to fill three weeks and students aren't receiving equitable hands on technology experiences.:(

    As a parent I'd be asking admin how the current tech students are going to be taught the same required curriculum that students in other semesters had.
     
  8. Jerseygirlteach

    Jerseygirlteach Groupie

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    Okay, I left this part out: I taught in the school for a year and I know her. That's how I know her age and how long she's been there. It feels awkward to go to her with a parental concern. Plus, she's abrasive. She's most likely not going to respond to me at all or at least not do it nicely. I know I'm making assumptions, here, but I'm pretty sure I'm right.
     
  9. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    New test, new demands. What do you want her to teach the students without computers? The timing sucks, I'll agree, but I am not sure, at the MS level, what she can teach without her "tools". Be honest, you aren't happy that your daughter has a 78 year old teacher in the first place, as evidenced by your fourth sentence. Whether or not you mean it to sound that way, it is what I immediately took away from your description of the situation.

    Realistically, computers is a slot filler class in most schools below HS. Most kids feel that they "know it already", and most do. I didn't say that it is fair that it is a slot filler, but I know that is what it is. Music falls into the same category for many, as does art. That may not be fair, but it is how schools see these classes.

    Perhaps it would bother you less if the teacher called it a study hall, telling everyone to come with either school/home work, or a book to read. That would be a reasonable request. If, however, you are looking for this teacher to instruct in something other than computers, I find that unreasonable, IMHO.

    Your beef should be with the district which didn't consider the impact on the students needing the computers to actually have a meaningful class, and I doubt that will get you very far. No one knows how things will play out with PARCC, so first year growing pains should probably be endured as gracefully as possible. If you really want to complain, may I suggest that at the very least you get assurances that your daughter have computers in quarters 1 or 2 next year, so that she isn't slighted two years in a row.

    I would certainly not mention the teacher's age at any time in the conversation, since age discrimination is ugly. If you want to question the curriculum, fine, that is fair, but leave age out of it.

    Complain, if you are moved to do so - you have that right as a parent. However, come prepared, with valid suggestions about something like a study hall, or perhaps a flipped classroom during this lack of computers, where the lesson is demonstrated, and the students must then work on computers at home to do the work. Perhaps no one considered that as a viable alternative. Be prepared, however, for complaints by someone else that this or that child can't do that because of lack of a home computer.

    Perhaps a better option would be to have smart phones allowed in that class for the duration, since that is a computer, after all. Students could share. It would be considered computers, at least, but probably not what the teacher would be comfortable with if smart phones aren't allowed in the school regularly.

    If your daughter will be taking the exam one of the three weeks, I would consider that a practical exercise in computer use, and let the teacher off the hook for that week. Understand that she didn't choose to do nothing - she was told that the computers wouldn't be available to her, and I bet she's not that thrilled with the arrangement. I bet most teachers here have been in her shoes at some point in their career.

    Complain to admin if that is what any concerned parent can do. Your thoughts will receive the same consideration as any other complaint unless you present them with a realistic alternative that doesn't involve running out and buying more computers over the weekend or asking the computer teacher to suddenly start teaching another subject. Be specific and realistic in what you are asking for, and I would consider it a win if they agreed to make sure your daughter could have computers quarter one or two next year.

    Good luck raising awareness, and remember, the computers will probably be out of use for class in quarter 4, for the EOY tests, so it isn't just your daughter who is being impacted.

    I wish you well, but do recommend leaving the teacher's age out of the conversation. Honestly, I see from a later post that you have a problem with the teacher anyway. It is what I would have guessed, but I was going to give you the benefit of the doubt and assume it was really just about the lack of computers. That history kind of taints your perspective, I believe, so take a hard look at the situation and decide if this is about learning about computers, or just a way to get a dig into someone you don't like. Very different motives. Good luck!
     
  10. a2z

    a2z Virtuoso

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    I'm not faulting you. I also believe you. I also bet that this teacher doesn't see herself as nasty or abrasive.

    I'm the one that usually advocates that there are usually reasons that parents will go over the head of a teacher either because of past experiences with other teachers or because they already know how the teacher will react to the issue. I try to point these things out other times because that is the reality. Those concerns often have merit even though when stated on this board those looking at it from the teacher perspective don't tend to like to either believe it to be so or would rather not have to confront the reality of what is being said.

    You are in a tough spot. The teacher side knows what you would like if the tables were turned, but the parent side of you knows what you will get from her (from experience from work but still experience with her) and wants to do what you think will make a change quicker.
     
  11. Jerseygirlteach

    Jerseygirlteach Groupie

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    That's not true at all. My favorite teacher that my kids ever had was well into her 60s. I only mentioned her age because, at that age, people tend to be pretty set in their ways. I know that sounds like ageism again to you, but I feel it's pretty realistic. That would be okay if I felt she had a strong desire to make sure that kids learn as much as possible in their time with her, but I don't and not that's not just because if this instance.



    I'm surprised you feel that way. I don't. Computers (as well as art and music) are vitally important for kids to learn IMO. I want my kids to learn research skills, typing, and software like Microsoft Office. I don't think of it as a slot filler at all.



    Fair enough. Maybe my frustration shouldn't be with her, but with the district. Or maybe just with this terrible test. I'm still upset, though.
     
  12. comaba

    comaba Cohort

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    I'm sure student smart phones would not be allowed during testing in my district due to the use of bandwidth. That may be concern in OP's district.

    If the computer teacher has been teaching for 50 years, she is probably certified to teach other subjects, hence she could certainly be providing other lessons.

    If there's a laptop, projector, and ELMO available, she can conduct some lessons that way.

    There's a way to alert admin to your concerns without throwing the teacher under the bus. You can simply ask admin what type of instruction is being provided during the computer class for the next 3 weeks since computers aren't available.
     
  13. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    I didn't say I think they should be slot fillers, I said they are frequently considered slot fillers. Big difference. Admin makes sure the "have to have" classes are set, and then they tend to use these other classes to fill gaps. I don't think it is fair, but I know my assessment is realistic.

    You didn't say whether or not your daughter is proficient on the computer and has access to these same programs at home. If she has access at home, I would respectfully suggest that you be the computer teacher at home for the duration of the testing, making her work with programs she uses less frequently, to expand her knowledge base. You could even set her up with a project that will require her to use two or more of the programs to complete.

    I know that this is throwing the teaching back on the parent, but the learning that will take place will be explicit, and tailored for your student's needs. Perhaps you can't save the couple of weeks for all of the students, but you can save that time for your daughter. I had to reteach classes for my son on a routine basis until HS, as we all learned to deal with his disabilities. It is the reason I teach now. I would teach all day, come home and start dinner, and then teach again. I just always figured that no one had a more vested interest in his ultimate outcome than I did, so I accepted the responsibility.

    Do I think that missing two weeks of computers will ultimately cause great harm to your daughter's future? No, but if I did feel that way, I would go to a board meeting and voice my concerns with how this has played out. I would ask about what changes they expect to make for next year. I would leave any personal animosity you feel for this teacher locked in the trunk of your car. Find out what the district plans to do to meet the increasing need for computers, and find out what you can do to help. That is what I did as a parent and a teacher. That turns discord into a win/win. :2cents:
     
  14. Go Blue!

    Go Blue! Connoisseur

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    My school's tech teacher - where HS tech is a mandatory semester credit - will not be able to use his classroom for the next 3 or 4 weeks. He is expected to teach his kids in another person's room - a different classroom every period - until the PARCC is over. His class is basically going to be a study hall for the next few weeks and no one expects anything else. He said he does plan on putting together some independent activities and bookwork for his students because our kids go buck-wild crazy with free time which is why my school doesn't have study halls. If I were this teacher, I would do the same thing.

    Thus, if I were you, I would let it go - but I know how many parents are when they feel that they are in the right.
     
  15. Go Blue!

    Go Blue! Connoisseur

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    ICAM! If I taught PE and the gym had to be used for a month so I was thrown into some classroom to teach; I would not bother to teach something other than PE. No sir.

    If only more parents were this reasonable and understanding.
     
  16. HistoryVA

    HistoryVA Devotee

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    I'm kind of surprised how many people are ok with these students doing nothing for 3 weeks. If I were a parent, I would absolutely expect the teacher to find something to fill the time and if it can't be technology, it should be something else. Have the students work on a project, build models of computer insides or SOMETHING. Sitting around for 3 weeks is ridiculous.

    I would talk to the teacher first, but then I would say something to the principal. "Siding with the teacher" just because we are teachers is wrong. We should not be letting problems slide just because we share a profession.
     
  17. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    For what it is worth, I'm not siding with the teacher because I am a teacher. I am, however, willing to give the teacher some leeway in this inaugural year of PARCC testing. If the testing remains, the districts are absolutely going to have to step up to the plate and provide the necessary computers to be able to test, and hold classes, at the same time. The defense you have heard in my reasoning is that this parent/teacher has history with the computer teacher that may cloud her vision of the situation.

    Do I think that missing two weeks of computers will ultimately cause great harm to the daughter's future? No,but if I did feel that way, I would go to a board meeting and voice my concerns with how this has played out, perhaps even finding other parents who share my concern. I urge the OP to leave personal issues with the teacher out of the discussion. The discussion with the teacher should be one on one, just like we would want any parent to treat us. I would ask what changes the board reasonably expect to make for next year. Find out what the district plans to do to meet the increasing need for computers, and find out what you can do to help. That is what I did as a parent and a teacher. That turns discord into a win/win.

    Most parents would attend a board meeting to address these issues, not immediately run to admin. The board meeting is the correct forum for this parent's concerns, IMO, as it will be moderated, and discussed going forward, and perhaps even opened to community input and the consideration of how to go about ramping up the computer numbers. This is not something that is an easy fix, aside from making the class period a true study hall, with mandated work from other classes or reading an age appropriate book directed by the ELA teachers. That certainly would keep the class from being devoid of meaning. Remember, the daughter will certainly be one week in testing on the computer taking the PARCC, so that should count as computer experience in excess of the class.

    I think there are many ways to see this and my personal vision is not as "protect the teacher" but rather as "this is new - give people a break." I would have the same reaction if "only" a parent, simply because that seems reasonable to me. But, differing opinions make the world go 'round!
     
  18. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    I think this teacher is in a bad situation through no fault of her own, and anything she chooses to do will make people upset. While some parents may be upset about the kids using the time for study hall, just as many parents would be upset if the teacher was making them do some random busywork to fill up the time. As a student, I would certainly be extremely upset if I had to go do some extra project for a class to "fill time." Since the kids are in middle school, I think this could be valuable study hall time for them and not just "sitting around." All kids at that age should have plenty of homework and/or studying that they could be doing during that time, and the good students will appreciate the extra time to work on it.
     
  19. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

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    If I were the teacher, I'd try to find something to do. I wouldn't just let my kids sit around for three weeks. I can't imagine my P letting us sit around for three weeks. Something tells me he'd have something to say about it ;) They could read articles about technology. My kids like reading ones about schools who try to enforce social media rules.

    As a parent, I would absolutely talk with the teacher. Then admin if I didn't get answers I liked.
     
  20. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    Just curious - would most parents get far with the principal if the school board had decided that this was the chosen actions to free up computers for testing this year? I know my principal would send me to the school board with my grievance.

    I do have some concerns that the OP considers the teacher abrasive, and basically doesn't like her before this incident. That said, I feel that there are probably many takes on this situation, depending on who you speak to. Since I have no way of divining which "truth" is the absolute "truth", I have chosen the path that most parents would take who don't have the admin's number on speed dial.
     
  21. Jerseygirlteach

    Jerseygirlteach Groupie

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    When I started with my current district, I had nothing. No board of any kind - smartboard, whiteboard, chalkboard - nothing. No curriculum materials, no supplies, nothing. I went out and bought some stuff, I begged and borrowed from other teachers, and I taught. I had plenty of excuses not to teach, but it never occurred to me to use them.

    If I was the computer teacher, I would teach. If the classroom had a smartboard (and almost all the rooms in that building do) I would show them how to research or use software on the smartboard. I'd let them take turns practicing it themselves. If the room didn't have a smartboard, I'd bring in my laptop and gather them around or take a few of them in small groups. I'd find or make how-to guides on using computers and I'd review it with my students. I'd have discussions and/or fun projects involving what the kids know about the world before computers, how they use computers in their everyday lives, and predictions for what they think computers will be like in the future. I would not shrug my shoulders and excuse myself from teaching because I was in a difficult situation.
     
  22. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    You should feel livid, and I'm a little amazed so many people are okay with this. About a third of this class will be nothing but sitting around doing nothing.

    The school can't help having to give this awful test... that's the state and federal government's doing... but giving your daughter some type of meaningful work isn't an unreasonable expectation. I'd go to the teacher first, explain your concern, and ask how she plans to ensure that students are getting meaningful instruction during that time. If the answer is that she isn't, then absolutely go to administration.

    As far as the earlier suggestion that she go into meetings with ideas, etc... why? She's not the teacher of the class. It's the teacher's job to design and implement curriculum, and considering that the teacher has known this would happen all year long, she should have had a plan in place by now that was better than just wasting students' time.
     
  23. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    I teach a primarily computer-based class. I guess mine is fairly different from what you're describing because we don't have set standards to meet. It's more of a tech literacy class and project based learning.

    (We have a lot of fun, and it does end up being laid back, but I think I'll be more strict next year).

    Anyway, we get booted out of the lab all the time because of this new testing stuff for weeks at a time. I've probably gotten booted out for 3 weeks twice this year already will probably be kicked out twice more. I'm lucky that I have my own set of Chromebooks that I got through DonorsChoose, but sometimes we have to do things offline too.

    From what I've found around the internet, some ideas for a technology (generally speaking) class:

    - Basic electricity, building circuits, motors, speakers, etc.
    - Code.org has a Computer Science 'Unplugged' curriculum; good for at least a week of activities.
    - Create paper versions of digital things like paper powerpoints, etc.
    - Watch a movie relating to computers
    - Recording things on their phones to be edited later.

    Like I said, it's probably different for this teacher if she has standards. I have the luxury of breaking out the K'nex sets and starting Engineering projects on a whim if I feel like it.

    Can the admin change the elective into something else for a while? Like a study hall, or something like creative writing?

    Edit: I loved the idea of someone mentioning building a model of a computers insides. Another idea would be to dismantle (safely of course) some broken computers or other electronics laying around just to see what's inside, and doing something with them like attempting to identify what the parts do.
     
  24. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

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    He would definitely be receptive and try to work something out. Our P is awesome. All our admin are, including the board, so I'm not really sure. It was up to each building how to get enough computers for testing. Our P was very cognizant about keeping as many computers available as we could.
     
  25. 3Sons

    3Sons Enthusiast

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    Not saying anything seems a message that the parents are okay with it (whether they actually know or not). You should say something even if it wouldn't directly result in a change.

    I agree with bros -- there's a lot you can learn and even have to learn without being on a computer. How the internet and networks function, how computers store information, computer security and public/private key infrastructure, how encryption works, types of viruses and what they do, etc.
     
  26. ChristyF

    ChristyF Moderator

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    I think a "free hour" could become problematic at middle school. I agree that the loss of the computers makes it difficult, and that's not the teacher's fault. However, I think she should be able to come up with something to do in that time. Maybe it could be study skills, debate, public speaking, character lessons, something.
     
  27. otterpop

    otterpop Phenom

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    This is what I would do.

    There's tons of vocab. If nothing else, kids could watch technology documentaries and take notes, then discuss.
     
  28. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    If nothing else, the class activities should be driven by the NJ tech standards. :2cents:
     
  29. comaba

    comaba Cohort

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    True. Actual computer use by students is not necessary for some of the standards, or could easily be accomplished with just one computer as a whole class activity.
     
  30. comaba

    comaba Cohort

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    We began PARCC testing last week, and computers are not available for computer class for 3 periods. My principal expects the computer teacher to provide instruction without student computers during this time. He would absolutely not allow the teacher to give a free period.
     
  31. Jerseygirlteach

    Jerseygirlteach Groupie

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    Thanks everyone for the feedback.

    I just had a deeper conversation about this with my daughter and now I'm in a rage. :) Apparently, there is a smartboard in the room, but the teacher is not using it. I asked what she is doing while the class is "hanging out" and she told me that she's "on her Ipad". "Doing what?" I ask. Both my kids tell me that she regularly plays Words with Friends on her Ipad during instruction time and is continuing to do so during this "free period" time. I know, I know. I can't take the word of adolescents, but my kids don't lie to me.

    There really isn't much that makes me ashamed of my profession, but things like this sure do.

    I emailed the principal about the lack on instruction. I didn't mention the Ipad or Words with Friends since he probably wouldn't believe it.

    I am so mad.
     
  32. Go Blue!

    Go Blue! Connoisseur

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    Everyone is not you. Maybe your daughter's teacher does not feel the same.

    If your daughter is given an independent assignment every day for the next 3 weeks, would you be ok with this? I am talking about book work or independent reading assignments.
     
  33. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    If the teacher doesn't feel the need to teach, or to assign meaningful work, that's something administration should be aware of. Giving students an independent assignment would be different than just doing nothing.
     
  34. Go Blue!

    Go Blue! Connoisseur

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    Not to some people here.

    If the teacher is not actively teaching and is just giving bookwork and independent reading passages with questions to answer - they would argue the teacher is not teaching and still be upset.
     
  35. Jerseygirlteach

    Jerseygirlteach Groupie

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    Well, I don't really care how she feels. She's getting paid to teach, so she needs to figure out a way to do that.

    I would be okay with any assigned work as long is it was meaningful, productive, and met the standards. If there was book work or independent work that met that criteria, I would be okay with that.
     
  36. Jerseygirlteach

    Jerseygirlteach Groupie

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    Mar 8, 2015

    You're right that if that was the extent of her instruction, I would still be upset. But anything would be better that nothing. How dare any teacher sit like a lump on a log and do nothing other than collect a paycheck while the students are not engaged in learning. It is shameful.
     
  37. HistoryVA

    HistoryVA Devotee

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    Mar 8, 2015

    But why can't she just teach? That's what she's getting paid to do! Why would the options be a lab full of computers or bookwork?
     
  38. stephenpe

    stephenpe Connoisseur

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    Mar 8, 2015

    I would embrace the chance to have a three week unit on something. I am not almost 80 either. This is the fault of the Admin and district. The other teachers need to come together and either make it great study hall or get some sort of curriculum going. How about the kids going to a close by Elem, school and do some tutoring? This testing nonsense is making things worse day by day.
     
  39. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Mar 8, 2015

    I've said it before in this thread. The testing climate is affecting programs. It's disrespectful of those other content areas and does a disservice to the students. This is definitely a concern that should be brought to admin. I wouldn't slam the teacher but would express disappointment in how the schedule/required content of some classes was being disregarded at this time.
     
  40. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    Mar 8, 2015

    There's a difference between giving an independent assignment and then sitting at your desk drinking coffee vs. giving an independent assignment and conferencing with students, teaching mini-lessons on concepts related to the assignment, etc. It's hard to imagine anybody having much of a problem with the second, particularly under these circumstances.

    Heck, even the teacher can't think of a single way to implement her curriculum for those three weeks, see if there's something else you can do. Bring in a ton of flyers, circulars, ads, etc., and work on budgeting. Find a book related to computers... there are plenty of Ray Bradbury short stories that would be a fabulous tie-in to a technology class, and if this teacher has never taught any type of English class before, just have the kids read them and come up with a generic discussion question.
     
  41. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    Mar 8, 2015

    But you missed the point. If this is a course of action dictated by the school board, who in their infinite wisdom considered that students taking the PARCC exams are getting more time on the computer in the pursuit of completing these exams than they are missing in the computer classes during the scheduled testing, what would you think the principal would do with your grievance? I know that this was the exact presentation and explanation from a local school board. Do you think the principal will raise a ruckus for a parent, or send that parent to confront the school board? My hunch is that if that principal couldn't convince the school board that this was a bad idea, he would probably send angry parents to the school board to raise the issue.

    My school has computers for testing, but all use of bandwidth, including Ipads and laptops, is shut down during all testing hours, impacting not only the students, but the teachers and specialists. Emotions are running high, kids are stressed beyond belief, and administrators are pulling out their hair. Some teachers, who are stressed as well, are lashing out at anything that moves.

    This is what is behind my advice to give everyone some slack this first round of PARCC exams - emotions are running high, and the students can't take much more. But I will go further and state that any parent who wants to take exception to how this is playing out should be prepared to take their complaints to the school board. The school board chose NOT to purchase an equal number of computers for testing use, and now they have a mess on their hands. Confronting the school board is reasonable and an acceptable course of action.

    We've been told to keep things light during testing, nothing stressful for the students. Many would say that is just as wrong, since it has brought much of the meaningful instruction to a virtual crawl. But our students are really struggling with this format and the scope of the exam, and I can understand why this is the way it will be for another week or so.

    This parent is quite capable of fighting the fights she wants to take on, and none of our responses really matter much in the long run. Testing takes about 10 hours per grade over the three weeks, all spent on the computer. Amazingly, the amount of computer class time most likely lost during this three weeks comes out to about 10 hours. Maneuvering through the PARCC exams on the computer is not the easiest thing I have ever done on the computer, so I am kind of thinking that there must be a learning curve, and improvement in skill sets. It is a stressful time, and I am sure that the school board and admin will have much to discuss when the last results are in, and life returns to normal. Personally, I can hardly wait for that day. :2cents:
     

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