writing IEPs

Discussion in 'General Education' started by 2ndTimeAround, Mar 22, 2014.

  1. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    Mar 22, 2014

    I teach high school so the IEPs my students have are usually written and revised several times over before I get them. While I've seen some that are crazy, for the most part they provide what I consider reasonable accommodations.

    I've been reading some education blogs this morning and I am shocked at how many IEPs with major accommodations there are out there. Some of the blogs speak about schools being out of compliance because students aren't getting what is specified in their IEPs. Almost all of the examples require a one-on-one para with students.

    In my neck of the woods it is a BIG deal if a student gets a 1:1. In all of my years as a parent volunteer, substitute and general ed teacher I've known around ten kids that have had one. In grades K-12.

    I saw today an article that mentioned a child being suspended for stomping on his teacher's hand and intentionally destroying her cell phone. I think the kid was in 3rd grade. The tone of the article was that the student should not have faced any punishment (or very little) because he had ADHD and his IEP specifically stated that teachers needed to curb his behavior before he loses control. I have no patience for that.

    Who writes these IEPs and how do they determine what services are to be provided? Is there actual data collected to support these ideas? With each individual child?

    I know at my school we require data in order to START IEPs but none is required to modify it down the road. If a sped case manager wants to tack on three new accommodations because she thinks they might help, they get tacked on. At a meeting last month I actually had to fight to not have one added because it placed too much responsibility on the teacher and not enough on the student. A few years ago a student's parent said she wanted her son to have one-on-one tutoring from his science teacher and it was actually written into the IEP that the teacher arrive to school 30 minutes earlier to give it to him. When he transfered schools his IEP went with him. I transferred the same year to the same school and knew what to expect so before he ended up in my class I had that part removed.

    How are the accommodations determined at your school?
     
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  3. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    When I was a special education teacher, I primarily used trial and error. I'd try reading directions out loud to a student. If that noticeably improved performance, then I made sure it was on the next IEP. If another student jumped up a grade level in their reading, I would forgo reading long passages aloud to them. If they kept their performance consistent, that told me they could do without a read aloud.
     
  4. FourSquare

    FourSquare Fanatic

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    I decide. I know my kids...I also ask them what they think they need. I try not to put anything too unreasonable. Reality is, some kids just need different things.
     
  5. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Our special education teachers with collaboration with the general education teachers write the IEPs and tentatively decide the accommodations. It's the ARD committee's decision to accept these or not. ARD is the same thing as other state's IEP meetings.
     
  6. iteachbx

    iteachbx Enthusiast

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    I've never seen an IEP that states teachers need to stop or control a specific behavior. I have had students with behavior plans on their IEP. If a child has out of control, impulsive or dangerous behaviors a behavior plan should be in place to help stop that behavior and it should be followed. However I don't feel it's realistic to say that the teacher must control the behavior. When a violent kid gets into that "crisis mode" I could use every behavior trick in the book and they still might hurt themselves or someone else. Is it possible there was more to the story? Was the child supposed to have an aide? Was there a behavior plan not being followed?
     
  7. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    Definitely possible there is more to the story.

    How common is it to have a one to one with a para in your experience?
     
  8. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    I have never been at a school where any student had a full 1 to 1, though a current student (blind+physical disabilities) has a 1 to 1 of some sort for most of the day. Frankly, I can't imagine the sort of situation that would lead me to recommend a full one to one.
     
  9. Emily Bronte

    Emily Bronte Groupie

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    There is something seriously missing from the article the op read.1:1s aren't very common on a gen. Ed. Setting. They're somewhat more common on more restrictive settings. Hard and specific data is required in determining why/what the 1:1 is needed for. Something is missing here.
     
  10. Special-t

    Special-t Enthusiast

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    Mar 22, 2014

    In my experience, in inclusion settings, only with students in Autism programs or students with aggressive or unpredictable behavior usually due to ASD. I have students on the Autism spectrum who would do much better with a 1-1 to help them maintain focus, but will never get that service because they do not exhibit serious behaviors. I do mention in their IEPs that they do best with 1-1 help, but it's not written in as a required service.
     

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