Writer's Workshop vs Daily Five

Discussion in 'Fourth Grade' started by MrsCSoup, Aug 8, 2009.

  1. MrsCSoup

    MrsCSoup Rookie

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    Aug 8, 2009

    I just finished a 2 day workshop on Lucy Calkin's The Writer's Workshop. I am pretty excited about implementing this philosophy in my classroom but am concerned about the amount of time that must be devoted to the "workshop". My question is this: We are expected to do the Writer's Workshop in our rooms. But, we were also given The Daily Five to read over the summer. I am not sure how I can "do" both methods/philosophies at one time. The Daily Five consists of 4 or 5 30 minute sessions, right? (I haven't finished reading the entire book.) Writer's Workshop is 45-60 minutes of writing. Should I scrap the Daily Five book? Do I try to bring elements of both into my room? AAAaaggghhh!!! I am confused!:help::unsure::eek:hmy:
     
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  3. SCTeachInTX

    SCTeachInTX Fanatic

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    Aug 8, 2009

    If I had to choose, I would choose Writer's Workshop in a moment. It is a proven way to teach writing that is based on research. The kid's LOVE it and if you can get them excited about something, you have less issues with discipline and more time to really engage students in meaningful learning. All the best.
     
  4. Bumble

    Bumble Groupie

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    Aug 8, 2009

    I student taught in a 5th grade class. We used the writer's workshop everyday. It was very effective. We finished writing a paper within a week. I not familiar with the daily five because we only use the writer's workshop.
     
  5. Ms.Jasztal

    Ms.Jasztal Maven

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    Aug 8, 2009

    Every day in my classroom-
    9:15-9:30- Writing Mini-Lesson
    9:30-10:00- Writer's Workshop
    10:00-10:15- Reading Mini-Lesson
    10:15-10:35- Center #1 (Strictly Reading-Related)
    10:35-10:55- Center #2 (Reading-Related, but with a strong focus on writing to reinforce different skills)
    10:55-11:25- Independent Reading and Journaling Time
    11:25-11:45- Whole Group Reading Lesson

    I have never incorporated the Daily Five.
     
  6. passionateacher

    passionateacher Comrade

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    Aug 8, 2009

    Ms. Jasztal,
    Is your "reading mini-lesson" when you teach a comprehension strategy such as "make connections, summarize, etc."? If so, what is the difference in the "whole group reading lesson"?

    What are some examples of "Strictly Reading-Related" centers? Are those read a passage and answer questions or silent reading without any writing at all?

    I am curious to know the difference with the lessons at different times.
     
  7. Ms.Jasztal

    Ms.Jasztal Maven

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    Aug 8, 2009

    I teach strategies during the mini-lesson, and then in whole group, it's specifically something from our reading series, Macmillan Treasures. Mondays- We read the newest story in the anthology and review vocabulary. Tuesdays- We answer comprehension questions. Wednesdays- We have a lesson where the kids read something that connects to the story. Thursdays- We have yet another connection or skill-related lesson. Friday- Students take a test over the story.

    Here are examples of my 10 centers during the week-

    Reading:
    • Teacher Center (Skills vary)
    • Making Connections with texts
    • Some sort of test prep or skill review. This center is group-specific. Skill games are within this center every once in a while.
    • Vocabulary Expansion (Includes vocabulary notebooks)
    • Technology (FCAT Explorer, designated websites)

    Sometimes in Teacher Center, Test Prep Skill Review, and/or Vocabulary Expansion, students read passages and answer questions. It depends. There are some passages the kids love.

    Writing:
    • Alternates- Writing from Manipulatives/Pictures/Mentor Texts // Newspapers (E-Edition) and Magazines (Basket)
    • Collaboration (ex. Literature Circles)
    • Journaling from Reading Texts (TIME for Kids)
    • Collecting entries/script writing/technology creating on laptops (informational PowerPoints, movies, songs on Audacity)
    • Teacher Center/Group Conferencing

    It's basically centers that go hand-in-hand with one another. Independent reading follows the second center every day.
     
  8. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Aug 9, 2009

    Wow, Ms. Jasztal--I wish I had that much time for my Language program. I need to fit it all in nine 50-minute periods a week (plus integrating Visual Arts and Drama during that time).
     
  9. Miss Butterfly

    Miss Butterfly Rookie

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    Aug 9, 2009

    Ms. Jasztal,
    I use the Lucy Calkins program. A colleague introduced it to me last year, and I fell in love. I can honestly say there are days in which I shorten writers' workshop to 30 minutes--but there are days when we (I try to write in my notebook, too) write for 45-60. I've never heard of Daily Five. In the end, you have to decide which program you think will work best in your classroom environment. Good luck!
     
  10. MrsCSoup

    MrsCSoup Rookie

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    Aug 9, 2009

    Hmmmmm...well this gives me something to think about. I have always felt so rushed with my Language Arts (last year I had 12 students pulled out of classroom for resource/Title)trying to squeeze as much as I could into the 1st 30 minutes. Some teachers say they "don't worry" about the students being pulled out, but I do.
    I am thinking that I will have 90 min. for my L.A. block. If I devote 45 minutes to writing then that only leaves me with 45 min. for reading. I think I will have to ponder on this a while longer......
     
  11. MsOC

    MsOC New Member

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    Jul 14, 2010

    I am struggling with the same issue. I read Daily Cafe, by "The Sisters, " which updates the Daily Five and is very user friendly. I too only have 90 minutes for ELA and am thinking about a 3 day a week five or a daily 2 for reading. The writers workshop incorporates reading activities, so it would be a daily 3, which might be OK for 5th grade. The 3 I am considering is Read to Self, Word Work and Writing (Workshop). Listening to reading is part of the mini lessons in Writers Workshop. Let me know if you find a brilliant solution. I think the two can work well together.
     
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2010
  12. trayums

    trayums Enthusiast

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    Jul 14, 2010

    I actually do Daily 4 and have a separate Writing Workshop time.
     
  13. collteach

    collteach Comrade

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    Jul 15, 2010

    I think teachers need to adjust the various programs out there to fit their students' needs. I get angry when I hear that some schools require teachers to follow, by the book, certain programs. I tried to start the Daily 5 last year when I taught 1st grade. Even after about 5 weeks, my students (who had a wide range of issues and were VERY behind due to a horrible K year....tiny school, only one teacher per grade level) were having so much difficulty with the demands of the program that I stopped and focused more on Kindergarten type routines and skills.

    I have used Writer's Workshop, and it was always so successful.
     

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