Writer's Workshop Rubrics

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by Starista, Aug 14, 2010.

  1. Starista

    Starista Cohort

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    Aug 14, 2010

    Good Morning!

    Hello! :love: This year I want to improve the way I teach, assess and grade writing. I teach the third grade. Our Language Arts series, Harcourt Trophies, has a nice writing component in it. I also am allowed to use the "Writing Mini-Lessons for Grade 3" book.

    I have always had a difficult time grading written work. However, I absolutely adore time set aside daily for writing. It's incredible to see what the children can do!

    If my third graders are responsible for writing a personal narrative, please suggest ways to best grade this assignment.

    Do you suggest a rubric out of 100 points? 10 points for capitalizing, 10 for indenting, etc etc.

    I have also read the scales of 1-5 which our Reading series suggests. 1 would suggest emerging and 5 would suggest competency. I am unsure how I would record that in a grade book.

    Thank you so much. :hugs:
     
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  3. Unbeknownst

    Unbeknownst Cohort

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    Aug 14, 2010

    Ultimately, you will be the greatest source for the answer to this question.

    As for a rubric, I would highly suggest using one. Not only does this help your students hone in on what you expect, but it is also a great tool if/when parents aren't the happiest about a grade a student received.

    As for the point allocation, it's kind of half of one and a dozen of another. If you allocate 100 points for the essay, and you count of 10, that would be the same as 50 points for the essay and counting off 5. Whatever grading scheme is easier to keep up with would be the one I would stick with.

    Finally, for how to grade an essay -- for example, a narrative -- I would consider grading only on what you've taught your kiddos.

    For example, if you really hammered away on verb conjugations and affix and suffix endings, mark off their papers for incorrect usage.

    However, if you see that a student experiments and with complex sentences or even the subjunctive mood, but does it incorrectly, just read over it and address it in a one-on-one later in the week.

    The point is this: Don't count off for everything on every paper. One, that is going to bog down your essay grading; two, your students are always in the experimental stage in writing. When you mark up their paper for things you haven't sufficiently covered, you're snuffing out their creativity and quite frankly doing additional work that won't be read anyway.

    I hope that helps. Now that I look at it, it looks like more advice for secondary than third grade. I'll post it anyway and maybe it will help in some small way.
     
  4. Starista

    Starista Cohort

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    Aug 14, 2010

    Thanks for the ideas and suggestions! :) Third graders are, indeed, in the experimental stage of writing and I do not want to use a rubric that will in any way discourage them from creative writing.

    Thanks again! :)
     
  5. Mrs. R.

    Mrs. R. Connoisseur

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    Aug 14, 2010

    I would also suggest creating your own rubrics that address the things that you feel are most important and that you've focused on in your class. Pre-written rubrics rarely fit what I've taught or stressed. I also sometimes co-create rubrics with my classes as part of our genre studies.
     
  6. chebrutta

    chebrutta Enthusiast

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    Aug 14, 2010

    http://rubistar.4teachers.org/

    This is a good beginning place for rubrics - even better since you can customize them to include only what you want or add what you want :)
     
  7. Starista

    Starista Cohort

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    Aug 14, 2010

    Thank you Thank you Thank you!!
     
  8. tgim

    tgim Habitué

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    Aug 14, 2010

    Every writing assignment that is to be assessed in my room has a rubric. I want the kids to know up front what I am looking for - it could be as simple as three items: a dynamic beginning, at least 4 detail sentences, restating the main idea at the end or ending with a feeling or opinion...or more complex to incorporate whatever you have been working on in English or one of the 6 Traits you have done a mini-lesson on recently.

    The other thing you might want to do is pattern your writing assignments and assessments after your state test to get the students familiar with the format they will see on the state test. This goes a long way toward developing confidence - they see it on the test and say, "Oh, this is just like what we do every week!" instead of getting anxious about it.
     

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