Writers Workshop Question

Discussion in 'Kindergarten' started by woobie5, Nov 18, 2009.

  1. woobie5

    woobie5 Comrade

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    Nov 18, 2009

    I really love the writing mini lessons on Jessica Meachams website. I am looking at one about "Ideas" in particular. She lists the lesson ... usuallly reading a story and discussing it ... and then says "Dismiss for Writers Workshop".... I'm confused about that part. She sends them off to write? HELP!
     
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  3. jday129

    jday129 Comrade

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    Nov 19, 2009

    Could you post the link?
     
  4. KinderCowgirl

    KinderCowgirl Phenom

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    Nov 19, 2009

    I am no expert, but when I do my modified version of W.Workshop the kids go write something with the expectation that they are going to use the skill from the lesson. If we are doing beginning, middle and end then I expect their story to reflect that, etc. I will also pull kids to "conference" with during that time or help guide through if they are having difficulty coming up with a subject to write about or need help with spacing or something.
     
  5. love_reading

    love_reading Comrade

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    Nov 19, 2009

    They should go back to their seats with the expectation of writing or drawing (whatever stage they are at) a story. Their writing would ideally reflect what the mini lesson was about. I really like her lessons too, because they include a read aloud. However, I always model a short story and sketch a picture for the kids after or during the mini lesson. They need to see a skilled writer write.
     
  6. vannapk

    vannapk Groupie

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    Nov 21, 2009

    love_reading is right on the money. After you finish your read aloud and mini-lesson (which also includes a visual model), then the students go to their tables and write in their writing notebooks. The expectation is that they will take the skill(s) that you just taught them and apply them in their writing. The share time at the end is also a very important part of the writing workshop process.

    So, for example if your lesson was about identifying the characters in the story and you read a fairy tale, afterwards you would model on a large chart paper or under a document camera if you have one, how to draw a picture and write words. During your model you would explicitly draw and identify the characters and include them in your writing. When the students went back to their tables to write you would support your learning goal by asking them "who are the characters in your story". During share time you would have the students share who the characters were in their stories with the whole group. Not all the students, just some or a few depending on attention spans. This way your learning goal is reinforced throughout the whole workshop sequence, during the read aloud, mini-lesson, independent practice, and share time.
     

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