Would you take the job?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by chebrutta, May 26, 2012.

?

Would you accept a job that paid you five years less than your actual experience?

Poll closed Jun 15, 2012.
  1. YES. It's a job.

    9 vote(s)
    33.3%
  2. NO. That's ridiculous.

    3 vote(s)
    11.1%
  3. Not sure what I would do in that situation/too many factors to consider.

    15 vote(s)
    55.6%
Multiple votes are allowed.
  1. chebrutta

    chebrutta Enthusiast

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    May 26, 2012

    Teachers in my district have not had a step increase or COLA for five years. Basically, if you have 20 years of experience, you're still getting paid for 15 (which is around a $4,000 a year difference).

    However, newly hired teachers are placed at the correct step. So a teacher new to my district but with 20 years experience is being paid for the full 20 years.

    My district's solution to this problem is to pay newly hired teachers five steps below their actual experience. The district is also saying that they don't believe new hires will have any problems with this policy.

    If you were hired in my district and told you would be placed five steps down on the salary schedule from where you *actually* belong, would you still accept the job?
     
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  3. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    May 26, 2012

    I think if I really liked the job, I would take it, knowing that many school districts are doing the same thing around the country.
     
  4. massteacher

    massteacher Companion

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    May 26, 2012

    It would depend on my financial situation. It's sad that this is what it's come to, but I feel that the teaching field is so competitive that many first-year or newer teachers are willing to take a steep pay cut to get experience.
     
  5. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Fanatic

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    May 26, 2012

    Public School employment... yes please. Catholic schools in my area make about 10,000 less so you would still be coming out ahead. Other districts also have big gaps. Newark, Jersey City, Elizabeth, etc. start at over 50,000 a year for new hires while districts right next door (but better neighborhoods) are in the low 40,000's so I wonder if your district has higher pay then any others around you to begin with?
     
  6. MsMar

    MsMar Fanatic

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    May 26, 2012

    Well if I hear you right if I have 5 years experience it's my choice to stay in my current district at the 5 year step or if offered a job at yours to go down to step 1. Right? So, if I can't take the pay cut then I would just stay in my current district. Here in PA if you switch districts the new district can do whatever they want as far as your past experience. So if they hire someone with 8 years experience they can offer to start them anywhere from step 1 to step 9. It's up to the candidate then to decide if he/she wants to accept the offer or not. I really don't see anything wrong with this. It's like in the private industry, a new company can choose to pay you for your past experience or choose to start you at a lower pay, and the candidate can choose to take the offer or not.
     
  7. MsMar

    MsMar Fanatic

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    May 26, 2012

    I choose "too many factors to consider" for my vote. I peronally have 4 years experience and I am hoping to find a position closer to home. Let's say I'm offered one I'd sure love for them to offer to put me on step 4 or 5. If they offer me step 1 then I need to look at other factors for sure - quality of the district, class size, tuition reimbursement, health plan coverage, and just the overall feeling for the district.
     
  8. BioAngel

    BioAngel Science Teacher - Grades 3-6

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    May 26, 2012

    If I needed a job, yes I would take it. I should be getting paid a heck of a lot more money at my current school (I'm guessing at least $20k if I went from private to public alone-- not to mention my heavy work load), but I love my school and it's a job.
     
  9. agdamity

    agdamity Fanatic

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    May 26, 2012

    I would not. Are they lowering step 1 by 5,000 for first year teachers? I realize many districts are having to cut budgets, but I would not voluntarily lower my salary that much.
     
  10. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    May 26, 2012

    I don't know of many twenty year veterans who would go to another district unless they were plumb out of a job or downright miserable. One would presumably have to go through the tenure process again...plus with 20 years in, a teacher is probably fully vested in the pension plan so taking a pay cut would impact future pension payment amounts (mine is based on last three years' salary).
     
  11. alioxenfree

    alioxenfree Rookie

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    May 26, 2012

    Yes

    There are many factors to consider, but know I would, because I did. I had 10 years of experience when I resigned from my old district to teach in my current district, where they only give credit for 3 years of experience. I didn't like it (actually I was insulted!) but it's the ONLY thing that I don't like about my new district. It's an excellent district and there usually aren't many openings. My old district was making me downright miserable (Thanks czacza!) and I would have not have survived much longer. It was worth it to me.

    For the reasons czacza mentioned, many of my colleagues in my old district with 10 or more years of experience don't want to leave because of the money, yes, but mostly because they don't want to lose tenure.
     
  12. MsTeckel

    MsTeckel Comrade

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    May 26, 2012

    good question! Im in a non-public school and some districts don't pay for experience at anything other than a public school...so it really depends on how far off it was from my current salary and cost of living of wherever I would go.
     
  13. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    May 26, 2012

    Not sure...but the fact that newly hired yet experienced teachers could be paid more than teachers with the district for years, that's enough make me bitter!
     
  14. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    May 26, 2012

    I think it would honestly depend on several factors...but I wonder what they do with teachers without experience. So a person has been teaching in your school four years is still making new teacher salary, so what do they do with a brand new teacher? Would they make the same as a teacher with 4 years experience?
     
  15. Danny'sNanny

    Danny'sNanny Connoisseur

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    May 26, 2012

    I was so happy to get my first (very tiny) raise after several years with my district.

    I got a little annoyed then to find out that they also raised starting salary by the same amount, so I am still making what brand new teachers make.

    This is a big problem in my district. Most teachers are getting no raise or even pay cuts every year, so when new people with some experience come in they are making more than the people who have been around for a while.
     
  16. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    May 26, 2012

    What would they do if someone with four years came in? Pay them less than step 0?
     
  17. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    May 26, 2012

    My district has continuously lowered first year teacher's salaries in order to align with the fact that no one within the district has gotten a raise in years. We actually took a cut this year- next year, it's just a freeze, but the quality of the insurance plan is also going down (they're forcing everyone to take a high deductible plan). I think it's more fair than a brand new teacher making a few thousand more than someone with the district for several years. My district actually does not pay for experience at all- we are pay for performance. Everyone has a "base" salary, and when they're actually giving out raises, you earn more based on performance. So someone with 20 years experience would start at the same base as a first year. This hasn't seemed to phase people, as we've hired several very experienced teachers in the past couple of years. In most cases, it's because they have a spouse with a steady job in the area and need a job in this specific location. Our districts are so large that if you want to live in this area, we are literally the only district that you can get employment with. You'd have to go 100 miles or more (depending on where you live within the district) to get to another one.

    I also noticed when applying for jobs elsewhere in the state that they all had notices on there that they would pay for up to 8 years of experience- no more. It doesn't matter to me b/c I only have 2 anyway, but I didn't see any salary scales that said they would take more than 8.
     
  18. chebrutta

    chebrutta Enthusiast

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    May 26, 2012

    Yes... a brand-new teacher will still make as much as someone with 1-5 years experience.

    Specific example - I came to the district with three years experience, after the pay freeze but while they were still doing step increases each year on paper (they finally froze it on paper two years ago). At this point, I have 6 years experience; my coworker has six years experience all in this district... but I make $1,000 more a year than he does.

    Prior to this point, my district granted new hires up to 26 years of experience on the pay scale. We get a lot of people who have retired from other districts, move here, get bored, and go back to work for a few more years.
     
  19. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    May 26, 2012

    I think I might under certain circumstances (many already mentioned). It certainly would not be ideal, but if I were so unhappy and I could get by on that salary, then yes. But, like I said, it wouldn't be ideal.
     
  20. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    May 26, 2012

    The problem is that so many districts are going with a pay freeze and still having hundreds of applicants for 1 position. Until this turns around, the school boards are going to think that this is acceptable.
     
  21. John Lee

    John Lee Groupie

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    May 26, 2012

    This is true, and you also correctly point out that this scenario depends on numerous factors. Most important is probably where this situation developed. I will tell you that if this were to happen to me (K-12, California, suburban/urban) you'd have hundreds of people willing to take the opportunity.

    As a specific example, I'm guessing that LAUSD starts at $45,000/year (just guessing). If they offered a first-year teacher a job at 10% ($40,500), 20% ($36,000), and even 30% ($31,500), you'd have your pick of hundreds of candidates at each point.
     

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