Would you send your own children to your school?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by AmyMyNamey, May 4, 2017.

  1. AmyMyNamey

    AmyMyNamey Comrade

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    I've been dying to ask this question for a long time, but keep getting hung up on all I'd like to say, getting mired in my desire to express untold frustrations and disappointments. I've realized I just need to get this question out there and stop thinking about how I feel, and instead focus on what others are experiencing.

    My own SHORT answer: HELL NO! My school is trash. We are underfunded, understaffed, underpaid, and overworked. We are chock full of emotionally and mentally disturbed children who destroy most any chance the "normal" kids have of experiencing a quality education. My school is violent. My school is a breeding ground for sexual deviance and abuse. There is no innocence. Our administration is spineless and its discipline plan is toothless. Race is often the deciding factor in how issues are resolved. We are accustomed to tolerating outrageous behavior. We have no moral compass. We have no perspective.

    In short, there are "children" at my school I would not allow my own children around, and for that reason I'd home school my kids before dumping them in the dysfunctional nightmare I call work.

    How about you?
     
    Last edited: May 4, 2017
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  3. rpan

    rpan Cohort

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    I would send my kids to my school. The school is not without its problems (although not to AmyMyNamey's extent of sexual deviance and abuse; acts of violence occur but are not everyday occurrences). There are problem students AND teachers AND admin but I strongly believe that it's the teachers in classrooms that make the most difference. And most of the teachers are fantastic educators who care. The problems are always going to be there, but I see how hard many of my colleagues work to make the best of it, to care when it's easier to not care and that's something important that I want my kids to watch and learn.
     
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  4. SpecialPreskoo

    SpecialPreskoo Moderator

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    I teach at a SPE school on the campus of another regular school. My daughter went there until we moved to a different county. I transferred her over there. I'm happier with her over there. People were like why move her over there? Well, she seems to have more extra activities offered over there. I'm more pleased with their teachers than where she was. They were ahead academically than her old school. I had to catch her up the first week she was over there.
     
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  5. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    It would depend on my kid. If we offered the activities that my kid was interested in then yes. We meet the needs of probably 85% of our students very well. If my kid didn't fall in that category then I would send them to a school that is a better fit.
     
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  6. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Sure.
     
    Last edited: May 4, 2017
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  7. Bioguru

    Bioguru Companion

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    Absolutely. My wife and I both teach at the same district and it truly is the best one in our city, bias aside.
     
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  8. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

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    I did and I loved having him there. There is no such thing as perfect, but I loved having him in my school, understanding what was going on first hand. He rode to and from work with me, and it was a great time to share with him. As far as the school, if it needed changing, who better to work on that than a teacher on the inside?
     
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  9. Pi-R-Squared

    Pi-R-Squared Groupie

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    No, I wouldn't send my kids to where I work.
     
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  10. ms.irene

    ms.irene Connoisseur

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    Yes, if I had them -- without hesitation.

    I was just talking to my husband last night about one of my students who is on the autism spectrum. I was retelling how I overheard him invite someone to the prom the other day. It was the sweetest, most awkward thing ever! My husband asked if kids like that got harassed at my school, and honestly, the answer is no. We somehow have actually managed to create an inclusive, accepting campus culture, while also achieving some of the best academic outcomes in our county -- and that is as a Title One school. We have a little bit of everything here, and it works!

    It has been a long, winding road for me to get to the school where I belong, and I know my school is an exception to the rule. I am very grateful for what we have!

    (Oh and I wanted to add -- the prom date said yes! )
     
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  11. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    I wouldn't be opposed, even though I'm considering leaving this school. Yet it has many very good things going for it.

    But... I also live not even a block away from a good elementary school.
     
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  12. melnm

    melnm Companion

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    I did, but I taught at a private school for that reason. I loved having them at the same school as me.
     
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  13. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    I saw the title of this thread and I was about to post "Psh, HELL NO" but then I saw OP already posted it.

    But I think more importantly there's no way I would raise my kids in this community. This community is trash. There's a reason why the suicide rate is so high here.
     
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  14. DobbyChatt

    DobbyChatt Rookie

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    No, and I would question public education in general for my children.
     
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  15. WarriorPrncss

    WarriorPrncss Companion

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    My last school I hated, they were terrible to the staff, but amazing to the kids. My current school, yes.
     
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  16. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    If my imaginary children needed our type of school environment (small group, no frills / extracurriculars, mostly credit recovery), I would absolutely have them attend.
     
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  17. GTB4GT

    GTB4GT Cohort

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    although some kids with good home life and appropriate parental support can do well in my rural school, I wouldn't want my kids here. The % of students who are academically motivated is just too low. I think kids do well when surrounded by a peer group with similar vision and goals.
     
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  18. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    My parents were teachers and purposely didn't send me to either of their schools so that I didn't have to deal with the whole "parent being a teacher" thing. My mom wanted me to be independent and didn't want to know absolutely everything that was going on with me at school. I really appreciated that growing up and I'd do the same if I had kids.

    If I didn't feel that way and I just had to choose based on the quality of the school, I'd probably still say no. The teachers at my school work very hard and the great majority are fantastic. Howeverer, I work in a very low SES school and there are a lot of issues. The behavior seems to get worse every year, to the point where there are always several classes in the building that are being robbed of learning on a daily basis because of out of control kids (they're missing instructional time becuase they have to evacuate the room). Besides that, our kids just have so many academic needs as well. If my hypoethetical child was a high achiever, I'd worry about them not being appropriately challenged because we have to focus so much on the struggling learners that make up most of our population. If my hypothetical kid was a struggling student, I'd worry about them not getting the help they need because it's spread so thin, whereas higher SES schools have a lot of resources to devote to their relatively few struggling learners.
     
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  19. geoteacher

    geoteacher Habitué

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    I sent both of my children through the school system where I teach. I even had one of them in class for the year. It happens to most of the teachers in my district, and it really isn't an issue.
     
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  20. agdamity

    agdamity Fanatic

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    Absolutely, in fact I do! My daughter is in second grade at my school.
     
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  21. Sab

    Sab Companion

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    Honestly, I wouldn't send my hypothetical future children to any school I attended or student taught at. I'd want them in a good, non-religious private school, though it's doubtful I could ever afford that, so
     
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  22. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    Honestly, family finances willing, I would homeschool.
     
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  23. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    I would send my daughter to the district I work in. I think the district she is in now is better, but wouldn't mind her being here.
     
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  24. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    I honestly don't know how I feel about homeschooling. Some of the kids I've seen that have gone through it are some of the best mannered, most intelligent kids I've known, though they are far more susceptible to their parents' misconceptions and ideas.

    Others have been complete a-holes. I guess it depends on the parent doing the teaching. In addition to that, I'd worry that my kid wouldn't be getting enough social interaction. And I can imagine really cool homeschooling lessons, like developing a whole outdoor homeschool curriculum or bringing in experts or really cool field trips, but I figure it wouldn't ever be as cool as it looks in my imagination.
     
  25. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    Homeschooling is fairly popular in my area and I have only seen good things. It's not like the kids don't interact with other kids in every other facet of life. Plus my state requires registration and standards.

    I also think some kids are going to be odd ducks no matter how they're educated.
     
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  26. tchr4vr

    tchr4vr Companion

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    Yes and no. The district we live in is a good district, however, they do not have the Dual Enrollment and Vo-tech opportunities that my district has. So, it will be very dependent on how I feel about his middle school experiences and what is developing at the high school. Things are in transition at my home district and my work district, so time will tell.
     
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  27. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

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    I don't have children. If I did, though, I wouldn't send them to the school I work at. With regard to test scores, we're the lowest in the county and a large number of my students deal with gang violence in the neighborhood, parents who are in/out of the picture due to being incarcerated (often raised by grandparents), and poverty/homelessness. I absolutely love working here because I truly feel like I'm making a difference; however, this isn't the place I'd want my family members to go to school.

    I would most likely send them to the school that's down the street from my parents' house (same district that I work in...across town, though) so they could assist with pick up/drop off/after school care. Thankfully, they're both retired folks!
     
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  28. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    That's true. I don't have children, so I don't know much about the other socialization opportunities outside of school, but I guess if you have them do some extra-currics they'd meet others.

    As for the odd-duck kids, I don't know. In my (frankly anecdotal) experience, I've only ever seen two extremes of homeschool kids: the really awesome ones, and the really terrible ones. I've rarely met any that were in between those two extremes, and I don't know if it's because these kids are less likely to succeed or enjoy life in public education (because it's not challenging enough, or public school kids are too ill-mannered for them, so they want to leave, or because they exhibit extreme social issues when around public school kids or they're getting bullied) so their parents choose to homeschool them, or if it's because their parents homeschooled them that they have those personalities. Not trying to make any judgments, just observations and questions.
     
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  29. Pi-R-Squared

    Pi-R-Squared Groupie

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    FWIW, my P sends his kids to where we work, but with cuts coming, P said he and his family might move elsewhere.
     
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  30. heatherberm

    heatherberm Cohort

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    I would send my kids to my current school, easily. It's not without its problems but there's good leadership in place and realistic goals for moving things forward. I would not send them to the school I worked at before this. The teachers are awesome and they work their assess off, but there are so many behavior problems and, as of last year at least, so much administrator turnover. Discipline is always in flux and the school moves from method to method so fast - every administrator wants to come in and start fresh - that nothing ever really gets a chance to stick. Their learning would be far too disrupted by kids around them.

    So many families homeschool now that it's pretty easy to find a community, ensuring that your kids have some socialization. My brother homeschools his kids and they belong to a homeschool co-op. They get together with other families for field trips and extra-curriculars, they go to tutoring where they work with other adults and groups of kids. My brother is actually in the middle of starting up a robotics team consisting of local homeschoolers and I guess they can compete in all the same competitions public school teams can. And then they do the normal extra-curriculars like church group, scouts, dance, etc. I have three nieces and a nephew (all siblings) who were homeschooled until 9th grade and then they went to a private high school. They were the first homeschoolers I ever met and it really changed how I thought about homeschooling because they're sweet, social, smart kids. As adults they've proven to be really awesome open-minded people, curious and engaged in the world around them, and they've worked and traveled all over the world. They pretty much all credit the tailored-to-them, non-traditional education they got growing up. I have mixed feelings about whether I'd ever try it myself, and as you said, it really, REALLY depends on the family, but I've definitely seen it work.
     
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  31. AmyMyNamey

    AmyMyNamey Comrade

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    I have less of a problem with the teachers than the students and administrators. I've worked at schools labeled the worst in the city, but in fact had great teachers tasked with the impossible.

    It's the kids I deal with. I do not want my own young children around them. Making matters worse are the administrators who are so afraid of a complaint or accusation that they allow the animals to run the zoo. While the lack of discipline paints a false image of fewer discipline issues (only on paper, because most issues aren't documented), it makes teaching in this school all but impossible. Actually, many find it impossible and just quit.

    I understand the way the system is gamed to put good teachers at an outrageous disadvantage, and I'd think long and hard before blaming a school's problems on its teachers.
     
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  32. ChildWhisperer

    ChildWhisperer Groupie

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    Absolutely NOT!
    I work in one of the worst districts in the state.
    My fiance & I already discussed that if we are still living in this area when we have kids, they're going to private school.
     
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  33. monkeyrun

    monkeyrun Rookie

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    Not if I could help it!!! Not a fan of the admin, test scores are awful, and there's too many students with too many things going on. There are some fantastic teachers at my school, a few I would love to have as my (non existent) children's teachers, but even with those fantastic teachers, there's still too many other students they have to deal with every day. I would feel like my children weren't getting everything they could. (I'm also just assuming my kids wouldn't be "those" kids...)

    With that said, the first school I worked at was a really "good" school. It was in a HUGE district though, so it would have depended on the school we were zoned for. I just think about the grade levels, and there are a few who I wouldn't really be thrilled with any of the teachers teaching my kid. For example, when I taught fourth there, there was one other teacher who I would feel good about having my kid in that class. That teacher left when I did, and I know they replacement. The whole fourth grade team now is made of "pinterest" teachers. Really cute stuff, not a lot of quality. First grade was another where I would have felt eh at best with any of the teachers.
     
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  34. PetrMishikoff

    PetrMishikoff Rookie

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    Here's another angle. I went to a school where my mother was responsible for HR. It definitely was a good experience. We carpooled. Teachers took special notice of me. It also means that I can't skip out class, can't get out of homework assignment, and bad test results went instantly to my mom's desk.
    looking bad, it's definitely a good experience. Hard to make friends though.
     
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  35. whizkid

    whizkid Cohort

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    No.
     
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  36. Go Blue!

    Go Blue! Connoisseur

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    No. I just had an administrator say this 2 weeks ago and it is the general consensus. That being said, many teachers in my district do not send their kids to our schools especially once they get to HS.
     
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  37. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    I would never have transferred my students out of our neighbourhood school, but I wouldn't have hesitated to have them at any school I have taught at.
     
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  38. MrTempest

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    This really is a great question, one that should be on a school climate survey. However, I would definitely not let my kids attend my school. Majority of my student are impoverished minorities but that is not the reason. My issue is that our administrations expectations for our students could hardly get any lower. We have an opportunity to address some of the things the students do not get from home and instead we “fail them forward” and do not provide adequate skills for their post-secondary endeavors.
     
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  39. mathmagic

    mathmagic Enthusiast

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    Yes - definitely. While I love teaching, and would love to spend more time with my child, I know I can have an impact on a full class of students while my child would still be receiving a great education. Plus, I think it's important for my (eventual, I guess I should say...ha) child to see a variety of perspectives, mindsets, and styles of teaching.
     
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  40. ms.irene

    ms.irene Connoisseur

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    It is so sad to me to see how many of us work at schools where we would never send our own kids. That says a lot about the state of things and how little support our schools are getting/what a low priority our public schools are. It's a downward spiral, too -- once a school starts to suffer, the families who can, send their kids elsewhere, taking their support and influence with them. And I don't blame them -- I think the problem goes all the way to the core of our society and its priorities.

    It's also interesting to see how many of us find fault with the admins as opposed to the teachers or kids themselves. Teachers are under so much pressure and scrutiny -- but who evaluates the administrators? Why don't admins get scorecards like their schools do? Why don't they get put on "improvement plans" if they are failing at their jobs? I think this is the part of the puzzle that is missing in all the talk of school reform -- the public points fingers at the teachers but not at those who are supposed to lead and train the teachers.
     
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  41. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Our administration is evaluated, although I'm not sure exactly what that looks like. I have worked with one VP who was returned to the classroom because they were not effective in an administrator position.
     
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