would you send home letter saying child is below grade level?

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by massteacher, Jan 14, 2013.

  1. massteacher

    massteacher Companion

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    Jan 14, 2013

    Hi all,
    I came back from maternity leave in mid November, and p/t conferences happened in the beginning of November. At that point child was reading on grade level. However with my recent assessments for the report card a few children are slightly below grade level at this point or have not made much progress. Our next p/t conference isn't until March. Would you write a letter and send it home, call, or schedule a meeting? I don't necessarily think a meeting is warranted, but of course I would offer that to parents if they wanted it. If you would write a letter, do you have a template that I could see or a way to word it? Thanks for your input!
     
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  3. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Aficionado

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    Jan 14, 2013

    I would call them on the phone or have a meeting. Bad news is always best done verbally. This encourages conversation and allows the parent to ask you how to best support their child.
     
  4. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    Jan 14, 2013

    I would definitely call to talk to the parent. Let them know what the assessments are showing, where the child is strong and weak, and what they can do to support their child at home as well as what you are adding in at school.
     
  5. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Jan 14, 2013

    :thumb:
     
  6. Tasha

    Tasha Phenom

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    Jan 14, 2013

    I would call with a plan ready. Tell them what you are doing and what they can do at home to help. Give concrete examples of what they are struggling with and specific resources to help.
     
  7. massteacher

    massteacher Companion

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    Jan 14, 2013

    Thanks so much! I think I'll email them a generic response saying I'd like to talk to them on the phone or in person regarding their child's progress so they aren't blind-sided if I just called them out of the blue and that way they will be prepared to talk. I appreciate the advice!
     
  8. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    Jan 14, 2013

    Sounds like a good idea!
     
  9. DrivingPigeon

    DrivingPigeon Phenom

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    Jan 14, 2013

    If I were in this situation, I wouldn't contact parents. If conferences are still a few months out, I would just come up with a plan for teaching and monitoring their progress. When March rolls around, if they're still behind, you would have 3 months to keep working on catching them up. Primary students fluctuate so much in their progress. They could flatline for a few months and then jump up 4 reading levels in 4 weeks (as one of my students did this year!).
     
  10. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Aficionado

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    Jan 14, 2013

    So why wouldn't you call parents to tell them this? Share the plan you have for teaching and monitoring progress, while assuring parents that primary students' progress fluctuates.
     
  11. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Jan 15, 2013

    I definitely think that a face-to-face meeting, or at least a phone call, is in order. Discuss your concerns and your plan to help your student improve. Set a date for a second meeting about 4-6 weeks from now to discuss progress. If the student makes improvements, fabulous, if not, at least the parents are aware as soon as possible.
     
  12. DrivingPigeon

    DrivingPigeon Phenom

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    Jan 15, 2013

    I guess I might...The way I look at it, every child has strengths and weaknesses. They are basically all on their own progress monitoring plan. If I notified parents every time their child scored below standard in something, I would be making many phone calls!

    For example, we took a math quiz last week. Some students scored very poorly. I wouldn't call parents and tell them, though...Instead, I am working closely with those students, and monitoring their progress. One week later, most of them have already grasped the new skill. No need to spend 30 minutes after school calling those 8 parents, when it just took a little extra attention to catch them up right away.
     

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