Would you have "saved" him?

Discussion in 'Behavior Management' started by lupin43, Jul 15, 2008.

  1. lupin43

    lupin43 Companion

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    Jul 15, 2008

    I am teaching summer school, 8th grade now: 9th grade in the fall.

    Student A wrote a sexually explicit journal. He was immediately expelled from summer school.

    Three days later,

    Student B drew a ***** on someone else's workbook. I saw it and turned it into the office. It was fairly detailed. The principal called me, with the student still in the room, and said he was kicked out, but if I wanted to keep him I could.

    Now, for both students this was an isolated incident. Both did work, were well behaved, etc. I did not feel it was acceptable to "save" Student B when both behaviors were sexual in content. Obviously Student B is furious. He feels that I could have saved him and didn't. Which is true, but it just didn't seem fair to save one and not the other. I was trying to be consistent.

    On a side note, I don't think the principal should have EVER asked me that while the student was in the room. Talk about putting me on the spot.

    So, would you have "saved" Student B?
     
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  3. 3Sons

    3Sons Enthusiast

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    Jul 15, 2008

    Yes.

    But, I do believe in freedom of expression, so I wouldn't have agreed with the expulsion of the first student, either.

    Did you have any control over the expulsion? If not, how could you think of yourself as being inconsistent for not agreeing with it?

    Additionally, even if you accept the expulsion for content, you would still be consistent if you considered the extent of the violation. "Sexual content" isn't an on-off switch, it's a matter of degree. Obviously, writing a journal entry is a more intentional effort than scrawling a picture (but arguably might have more value).

    Oh, and it was, at least, Student A's own journal. Drawing on someone else's workbook is kind of rude, even if it had been inoffensive.
     
  4. teacherpippi

    teacherpippi Habitué

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    Jul 15, 2008

    I think it was pretty bad to ask you to make a decision with the student still in the room.
     
  5. Lindsay.Lou

    Lindsay.Lou Companion

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    Jul 15, 2008

    I agree you were in a horrible position. However, the reality is, you were only asked to *save* student B, you weren't given input on student A (right?) Given the opportunity, I would've saved student B.
     
  6. lupin43

    lupin43 Companion

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    Jul 15, 2008

    I agree that *now* I would save him. But being put on the spot and knowing the situation with Student A, I just tried to be consistent. I wish I could change it, but can't. Well, I could ask tomorrow, but I don't know how that would look or be responded to in the office.
     

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