Would You Consider Teaching In Rural Area?

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by rachel81, Jun 29, 2011.

  1. rachel81

    rachel81 Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2008
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 29, 2011

    So I've gone through several interviews this week in Georgia with just one rejection so far. I actually went applied to some rural areas in other states and got a phone call yesterday to interview with a principal at a school in Arkansas.

    Have any of you considered teaching in rural areas? Now that I'm thinking more about it, it sounds like a good idea because I can't find anything here in Georgia. I have no family to speak of (orphan), just a boyfriend who would stay here and I would have to visit a lot.

    I'm mostly tired of the interview process and feeling like I'm not good enough to ever get a good call back.
     
  2.  
  3. Rainbowbird

    Rainbowbird Groupie

    Joined:
    May 6, 2011
    Messages:
    1,359
    Likes Received:
    22

    Jun 29, 2011

    Yes, if I were in your shoes, I would. You are not tied down to children or family obligations (believe me, that limits your options a lot)! You can always stay a year or two and leave for a better position if you don't like it. It would be experience that will serve you later on.
     
  4. iloveschool

    iloveschool Companion

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2010
    Messages:
    160
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 29, 2011

    I teach 1st grade in a small rural school. We have 750 studens from pre-k thru 12th grade. My husband teaches in the high school. I love it!! Two of my children have graduated from this school and I have a son in the 3rd grade. It is nice because you know everyone. The staff is friendly and helpful. Small schools have alot to offer, but are not for everyone. I say give it a chance!
     
  5. TXowl

    TXowl Companion

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2010
    Messages:
    216
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 29, 2011

    I have a follow up interview in a couple of weeks for a job in a small rural district. It is very small though (<200 students in the whole district pk-8) and doesn't even have a high school. After my first interview and researching it, I really like the idea of working in a rural district. It has a lot of advantages!
     
  6. Aussiegirl

    Aussiegirl Habitué

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2007
    Messages:
    838
    Likes Received:
    8

    Jun 29, 2011

    Ditto. If there are no ties, go where your heart leads you. I teach in a rural area, though maybe not as rural as Arkansas can be, and love it for many of the same reasons. The major issue I face is that in some rural areas, especially those where people are poor and/or poorly educated, the parents may not value education, and therefore, it is harder to instill that appreciation in your students. You may not have the parental support you expect, and the school might not have the level of technology that a metropolitan school might have. There are ways to work around that. Fully 1/3 our our kids don't have computers. Of those that do, many do not have a newer computer, so even if they access the Internet, they can't pull up the electronic version of our textbook, etc. Many of the kids with computers don't have Internet access or printers. As the economy worsens, I think more and more kids will have less and less access to technology from home. The schools here don't exactly have the most up to date technology, and what we have is not enough for every classroom. Our kids, nonetheless, score better than the state average in almost every subject in every grade. Our seniors attend some of the best colleges and several have gone on to become famous as athletes, writers, etc.

    Good luck! If nothing else, it gives you a year or two of experience you can list on your resume if you decide you want to go elsewhere. Let us know how you make out.
     
  7. MJH

    MJH Companion

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2003
    Messages:
    113
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 29, 2011

    Louisiana

    My first seven years of teaching I was in Rural Louisiana. My school sat in the middle of the sugar cane fields and I loved it. It really gave me the opportunity to perfect my teaching and classroom management.

    I moved because I was over 13 hours from home and I had my first niece arriving. I wanted to be able to play a part of her life so that meant moving closer to home. I really miss teaching in a rural area. Now, I teach inner city which also has it's positive aspects.
     
  8. Mommyserenity

    Mommyserenity Devotee

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2009
    Messages:
    1,017
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 29, 2011

    My hometown is not too rural, but had a ton of jobs open last I looked at TeachGa. It's an area where lots of people move away for jobs or come for a few years and then transfer etc...it's not a bad system though and I have a lot of friends who teach there and love it. Msg me and I can tell you what county.
     
  9. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2010
    Messages:
    10,924
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 29, 2011

    I would go for it! I don't see a reason why you shouldn't in anything that you said.

    Now, if you cannot live in a rural area that is different.
     
  10. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2005
    Messages:
    4,395
    Likes Received:
    7

    Jun 29, 2011

    I teach in a small town. The population is less than 500-in the town, not the school. My school is K-12, around 150 students total. I grew up here, so I love it.
     
  11. yellowdaisies

    yellowdaisies Fanatic

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2011
    Messages:
    2,653
    Likes Received:
    233

    Jun 29, 2011

    This is not just true in rural areas - I know of plenty of urban areas where this is true!

    California really does not have many true rural areas in the sense that other parts of the country have them. I grew up in a California small town that most people in this state would consider "rural"...but it had (it's smaller now) a population in the 2,000s. It was also 40 minutes from a city.

    Personally, I would love to teach in a small town...but I can't teach in a very remote rural area. I am not single, and I need to live somewhere that my husband can get a job also. If that means living between a city and a small town and each of us commuting 30 minutes or so in opposite directions...well, we could do that. :) I'm not applying for jobs until next hiring season (still in my credential program until December), but when I do, I know I'll have to rule out jobs that are too remote. If I was in your shoes, though, I would go for it!
     
  12. MissAnt

    MissAnt Comrade

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2010
    Messages:
    261
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 29, 2011

    I teach in a rural school and really like it. Rural districts tend to have fewer applicants which makes it easier to be noticed. When I was looking for a job last summer I made it a point to apply to as many rural districts as possible. Good luck with your search.
     
  13. cartwheels

    cartwheels Rookie

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2011
    Messages:
    65
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 29, 2011

    It depends how rural. I've been living in a major city for the past eight years (and grew up in a suburb of said city), so it would be a bit of an adjustment, I think. A small town I would be okay with, but a truly rural area, like rural Appalachia, I don't think I could handle. Either way, I'd probably only end up doing it for a few years to get some experience under my belt, though, before trying to find somewhere else.
     
  14. rachel81

    rachel81 Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2008
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 29, 2011

    Wow, thanks for all the replies guys! I step away and come back and this thread has two pages :D. I love all of your insight. My boyfriend is being a bit of a butt about it (we've been together 4 years), but I have to do what I need to do. So I'll see what happens once I talk to the principal on Friday.
     
  15. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2001
    Messages:
    24,956
    Likes Received:
    2,108

    Jun 29, 2011

    I've lived north, south, east and west. City, shore, country. If you are offered a job doing what you love, go for it. Seems like you have nothing holding you back. Good luck to you.:love:
     
  16. Cerek

    Cerek Aficionado

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2009
    Messages:
    3,094
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 29, 2011

    Personally, I wouldn't consider teaching anywhere BUT a rural area. I still live in my hometown and my boys are growing up near here as well. So any job I take would HAVE to be in this area (so I can be near them).

    One of my lifelong friends once told me "You're just a hometown boy, aren't you?" I have to admit, he's right. I'm very comfortable living in a small town and driving to the "big city" when necessary (even though it can be a hassle sometimes).

    I'll take rural over urban any day. Nothing against the urban setting, it just isn't for me.
     
  17. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2009
    Messages:
    3,280
    Likes Received:
    469

    Jun 29, 2011

    I taught in a rural area and it was amazing! I would do it again, except I don't deal well with living in rural areas, and gas is so expensive!
     
  18. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2011
    Messages:
    5,906
    Likes Received:
    776

    Jun 29, 2011

    When I was job searching, I applied absolutely everywhere and would have been thrilled to have a job regardless. However, a rural area would be my absolute last choice if I had to pick. I grew up in the suburbs about 15-20 minutes away from a large city. My college was also in a city (a smaller one, but still a city). I never realized how nice I had it until I moved here! I'm in a "small town". It's not extremely "rural", there are things to do- but we are 2 hours from the nearest big city. I just took for granted having anything and everything around before- I can't believe how many things just aren't here and you have to go closer to the city for. For example, we don't have a mall within 90 minutes of here or any type of affordable shopping, the closest car dealership is 50 minutes away, there are no chain resteraunts, etc. We are pretty touristy so we have some nightlife, which is good. Even little things are annoying- such as having no good radio stations (we have about 8 choices, all country or religious, no top 40 station or anything) and the fact that any time you try to watch the news or weather, it's about the city which is 2 hours away and not relevant.

    My best friend works in an extremely rural area and I would absolutely hate where she lives. It's literally just cornfield after cornfield. The nearest resteraunt, bar, real store, anything is basically 30 minutes away. Her town has a gas station and a wal mart. That would be VERY hard for me to live with, especially considering my current location feels a bit small, and its 50x bigger than where she lives.
     
  19. leighbball

    leighbball Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2005
    Messages:
    7,507
    Likes Received:
    1

    Jun 29, 2011

    I say go for it! It can't hurt to apply and then you can figure out whether or not its for you once you get further into the process.

    Please don't be discouraged about the jobs- all of my offers came in August over the two years I searched, despite being told I was a great candidate or a finalist. The right job is out there. Like Alice said on another thread, the economy is really messing with the job market right now and there will probably be more summer hirings now than ever.
     
  20. agdamity

    agdamity Fanatic

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2007
    Messages:
    2,689
    Likes Received:
    459

    Jun 29, 2011

    What part of Arkansas? There are some really good districts in South Arkansas. There are also some districts I would steer clear of. I live just outside of Little Rock, and I have to say one of the greatest things about teaching in Arkansas is the Education Funded First law. Basically, it means that when the state budget has to be trimmed, it CANNOT be trimmed from education. We are in a really good position compared to most other states because of that law.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. stephenpe,
  2. MrsC,
  3. futuremathsprof,
  4. RainStorm
Total: 487 (members: 6, guests: 456, robots: 25)
test