Would you be annoyed?

Discussion in 'Behavior Management' started by Bogart, Nov 29, 2006.

  1. Bogart

    Bogart Rookie

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    Ok, I'm just curious if I am overreacting. Does anyone else find these behaviors rude?

    1. If a student raises their hand and then starts snapping at you. I don't know if that makes sense, but sort of like how a snooty person would try to get the attention of a server at a restaurant. I have a student that does this to me, and I thought it was inappropriate to do to a teacher. Maybe it's just me. I asked my boyfriend and he didn't seem to think it was that rude.

    2. Let's say it's 11:11 and class ends at 11:10. A student shouts out, "can we go?" This happened to me today. I thought it was very disrespectful. I know if I were listening to a speaker or something, I would never say, "hey it's time to go" or something like that. I would be patient and just wait until they were done.

    I don't know. Maybe I am making a big deal about nothing. What do you guys think? Thanks!
     
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  3. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    I think both things are rude. I would not worry about the second one as much - since I sometimes lose track of time. I wouldn't tolerate the finger-snapping at all, though.
     
  4. Major

    Major Connoisseur

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    Any kid who raises their hand and THEN starts snapping at me would be in "deep sneakers." I suggest zero tolerance.
     
  5. Tigers

    Tigers Habitué

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    The former is very rude. The reason we even ask kids to raise hands in the first place is to teach them turn taking. I am not very fond of hand raising, but if the kids do not understand how to politely wait for their turn, the requirement of hand raising becomes a reality. Snapping your fingers to request attention is the same as interrupting or not waiting for your turn. The latter though is a little more gray. The kid was definitely disrespectful. The kid wanted out of the class; this can be understandable. You should explain that while you, too, understand these feelings, there are more respectful ways to address a teacher, speaker, boss, co-worker, etc.
     
  6. Steph-ernie

    Steph-ernie Groupie

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    The snapping is inexcusable. I would not tolerate that. The second one is also rude, but it does happen. I usually respond by saying something like, "yes, I can tell time."
     
  7. herins

    herins Companion

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    For the second one, I would have been tempted to say "the rest of the class can, but you can wait until I tell you class is over". But, I'm mean! :D
     
  8. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    1. If a student raises their hand and then starts snapping at you. I don't know if that makes sense, but sort of like how a snooty person would try to get the attention of a server at a restaurant. I have a student that does this to me, and I thought it was inappropriate to do to a teacher. Maybe it's just me. I asked my boyfriend and he didn't seem to think it was that rude.

    - I had a student do that to me ONCE. I very calmly explained that, when in college, I was a waitress. If someone snapped their fingers at me I turned and walked away and took my time getting back to that table. Now, as the one who marks their reportcards, they would probably want to show me respect. It didn't happen again.

    2. Let's say it's 11:11 and class ends at 11:10. A student shouts out, "can we go?" This happened to me today. I thought it was very disrespectful. I know if I were listening to a speaker or something, I would never say, "hey it's time to go" or something like that. I would be patient and just wait until they were done.
    --I'm sure I'm not going to win any friends here. But I take thes students' side here. When that bell rings, they have 4 minutes (in my building anyway) to get to their lockers, maybe hit the bathroom, and get to a class on the other side of the building. When your class runs over, you're setting them up to get in trouble with the next teacher. So while he WAS rude to shout out, he did have a valid point.
     
  9. Miss W

    Miss W Phenom

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    Our high schoolers have 10 minutes inbetween classes, and teachers can send passes if they need to. Sometimes class runs over because students need a little extra help. One minute, in my view is not that much time to fret over. It was rude of the student to shout out. I would talk to your class about it, and explain your views. Then let them debate theirs. What do they have after you? Lunch or another class?
     
  10. synapse

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    Of course various student behaviors can create intense feelings in us. If it feels like a big deal to you, then you need to do something about it. However, I suggest that before reacting on those feelings, you try to consider the entire context. Why are these students behaving in this manner? Is it because of things that you control in the classroom? Is it because this is the way they've learned to gain attention?

    Frequently, behaviors that the OP describe are easily solved with a brief, private 1 on 1 conversation.

    Just as easily, they are escalated by a teacher who reacts based on his or her emotions at the time.
     
  11. Tigers

    Tigers Habitué

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    I think one on one conversations were a given in these situations. But, in the "can we go yet" case, I think talking to the class in an understanding way, and letting them all know a better way to address their feelings. so everyone is on the same page. Since rudeness is a cultural issue, having class discussion on the subject could be benificial.
     
  12. synapse

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    Agreed (except I don't think rudeness is a cultural issue).

    The point I was trying to make revolved around the OP's "annoyance" and how, as teachers, we need to be careful about REACTING based on those feelings rather than ACTING based on careful thought.
     
  13. Tigers

    Tigers Habitué

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    well said.

    as teachers, though we know how important self analysis is, we need to remind each other of this often.

    As far as rudeness goes....rudeness is the breaking of social standards. we see the cultural aspect of rudeness, when looking at different cultural norms.
     
  14. synapse

    synapse Comrade

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    Except that rudeness is percived by individuals...So I would ask, :the breaking of whose social standards?" What might be rude you...may just mildly annoying to me...or perfectly acceptable. When one states that rudeness is "a cultural issue," it is too easy for that to be misinterpreted as meaning that a particular cultural group exhibits rudeness as a component of their cultural norms.

    ...always fun to chat with you Tigers...
     
  15. grade1teacher

    grade1teacher Companion

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    Am I the only one who is curious about the absence of a bell?
    We teachers are all human - and many are passionate about the subject matter we are teaching, so naturally, we lose track of time. The bell reminds me when class is over - there is no need for a student to do so.

    If there is no bell (?) perhaps appoint a student to politely (and you may need to explain what you expect with this) raise their hasnd and tell you when it is time. Sometimes we teach manners. Personally, I think that it is probably considered impolite by most people to interupt the speaker to ask to leave, and students should know that,for the future, even if it does not bother you in the present.
     
  16. Tigers

    Tigers Habitué

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    ....ditto synapse...


    ahh, I see where I mispoke. To try again, We percieve rudeness based on our socialization process, which is intimately tied to the cultures to which we are exposed. Thusly, we recognize certain acts as "rude," while others see them as acceptable. Teachers need to keep this in mind, so that they understand children come from all sorts of different cultures (which is not just the color of you skin). This brings up why classroom discussions about rudeness are relevent. Even though we should have cultural sensitivity we must set forth guidelines that will inevitably be influenced by our own socialization process. Therefore, need to explain some of these concepts that might be foreign to some students.

    Nice one, I hate to be inarticulate or ambiguous without intention in my speech. thanks for catching it :p :) :)
     
  17. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Wow!! That's a huge block of time!

    We also take attendance (by computer) as each class starts, so kids who are late to class have more than just a little explaining to do.
     
  18. Miss W

    Miss W Phenom

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    Well, our classes are an hour and a half long. The campus also has 5 different buildings that the students have to walk between, so they need that time to get to their lockers and to their classes.
     
  19. Miss W

    Miss W Phenom

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    I don't think you are making a big deal. You are the teacher, and you should have control of the class. I still think you need to talk to the class for appropriate behavior. Include them on the conversation. Students can have pretty insightful conversations sometimes.
     
  20. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    Watch out!! The snapping finger thing is happening in kindergarten! These kids probably saw mommy or daddy doing it in a restaruant. Last week, my cute little boy was raising his hand and I was in the middle of talking, so I ignored it. Well, then I hear a snapping sound. i was shocked. I said, did you just snap at me. He laughed and another kid started snapping. I just gave them the teacher look and tried not to let it get to me. But, that's just really annoying and luckily (and hopefully) it was just that one time.
     
  21. JenPooh

    JenPooh Virtuoso

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    I would find both incredibly rude and disrespectful.
     
  22. ChristyF

    ChristyF Moderator

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    I will sometimes have one child try the fingersnapping, but only one. When they do, I go overboard. I rush over to him/her and start checking them over being very dramatic looking for blood/wounds, etc especially around their mouth. When they ask why I calmly tell them that I know they would never be so disrespectful as to snap at a human and expect a response unless they were severely injured and unable to speak. It has never failed to get a lowered head and an apology. I honestly think most kids (at least at my level - 5th) have seen it and don't think anything of it.
    As for the 2nd, we do rotate, but they go as a whole group so I can easily tell the other teacher if I need them for an extra minute or so. In that case I would have fallen back on that old teacher standby- The bell (or clock - we don't hear our bells either) doesn't release you, I do."
     
  23. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

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    I'm not sure how I would respond to snapping...I guess it would depend on my mood. I can tend to be a bit sarcastic, so ChristyF's response sounded good to me. If I was in a good mood, I would probably completely ignore him until the snapping stopped (you know, reinforcing positive behavior)

    As for the time thing, this is one of my biggest pet peeves. I solved this problem by covering my clock with a big smiley face that says "no whining". My watch is the official timekeeper. But then, our elementary is not dependent on the bell system of the high school.

    kcjo
     
  24. MsMathGeek

    MsMathGeek New Member

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    I don't feel that you are overreacting. Snapping is just plain rude. Can you give us more details about the second situation? (i.e. Was there a bell? Did you lose track of time, or did you explain to them that you just needed a few minutes to finish up the lesson?) In any case, it sounds to me like the student could have got the same point across with a much nicer delivery.
     

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