Would you add addtional certifications to your license if you weren't teaching?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Mommy1982, Apr 1, 2015.

  1. Mommy1982

    Mommy1982 Rookie

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    Apr 1, 2015

    I'm certified in Childhood Edu 1-6. I have not taught full time yet and my license is going to expire this year. I plan on filing for an extension, which in my state I believe it will give me another 1 1/2 - 2 years. Right now, I've used these past few years to stay at home with my kids (plus there was hiring freeze iin public schools on my certification up until this past summer), but I planned on possibly going back to work and looking for a teaching job either this school year or the next. But I know it's just going to get harder each year, plus I'm getting older and in all honesty I never thought I was going to be teaching my first year in my mid-30s:unsure:.

    In all honesty, I'm not sure what grade I'm really the best suited for either. I'm trying to think of what would give me the best shot of a job. Universal Pre-K is huge in my state right now, so I know there is a big chance of landing a job in a UPK at a public school or private preschool. I only have to take one more additional class, have a transcript review and I will then be certified in Birth-2. Plus, this new license will be valid for 5 years. A few people also told me that Special Education Itinerant Teachers are becoming very in demand and also offer great flexible scheduels, which would be great for me. For that though, I would need to be certified in Special Education, so would need to take an additional 3 classes and take another test.

    All of these classes are offered online at a college in my area, but the price is well over $1000 or more for just one class and I would not be able to get a student loan. I'm not going to lie, we have tons of bills, including my first student loan that went into re-payment, so when I mentioned it to my husband, he really didn't seem all that onboard with it. We really can't afford to waste more money, plus it's not like I'm guaranteed a job either. I guess I'm trying to see what would make me more marketable. I applied to pre-schools teaching jobs this past summer, and got a few interviews. All of those schools though, if I was offered a job, I would have 1 year to become certified in Early EDU.

    So do you think it would be wise to add an additional certification? If so, would you do Early Edu or Special Edu?
     
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  3. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    Apr 2, 2015

    So, do I understand that if you took the pre-school job you would simply need one course over the course of your first year of employment, plus the administrative hoops? That would have you paying for a class while you are earning an income, if I understand you correctly. That seems like a fairly painless way to add a certification.

    Honestly, I would be looking for a job in your original certification, but that is just me. Please don't take this the wrong way, but mid thirties is not "one foot in the grave." I think you have cold feet from staying away from teaching, and the fear is holding you back. I would think that if money is tight, getting a full time job sounds more than reasonable. If you get that job, around here you would get tuition reimbursement as a benefit after six months on the job, so if you wanted to explore other certifications or endorsements, it would be more budget friendly and palatable to your husband.

    I mean this in the kindest way - swallow the lump in your throat, submit applications, and see what pops up. If you don't apply, I can guarantee that you will not get a job. If you submit applications, you have a real shot. Your first day may be scary, but whose isn't? Be brave, or find another job away from teaching so that you can pay down those student loans - that's a drag to have hanging over your head. Good luck.
     
  4. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    Apr 2, 2015

    I always recommend getting additional certifications. Learning new techniques and ways of reaching students in never a bad thing, and you will have more options. Personally, I think it should be a requirement for all elementary teachers to be dual-certified in special education also, and would always recommend that certification, but taking that many additional courses may be daunting. It really comes down to your own interests though. If teaching Pre-K seems like something you'd like to do (or, at least, if it seems like a viable alternative if an elementary classroom job doesn't open up), then give it a shot! Worst case scenario, you do it for a year, don't like it, and go back on the job trail... with a year of experience and letters of recommendation in hand.
     
  5. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    Apr 2, 2015

    You can never go wrong with letters of recommendation in hand! ;)
     
  6. Bunnie

    Bunnie Devotee

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    Apr 3, 2015

    Sounds like you are in the NYC area. While they are opening a lot of UPK, those jobs aren't easy to get either, on the public school level. So many teachers with years in the system have snatched up those jobs as they become available.

    People around here are always going to tell you there are more jobs in sped. And it's true. If sped is something you are passionate about I would go for that, as the job market is much better.

    I was hired into the NYC public school system this past year as a gen Ed teacher. It was hard to get interviews. I sent out over 200 resumes directly to principals. I heard back from maybe 5. I was hired early on before school ended last year. Might I add I do have a second certification in Technology. That second rare cert got the attention of a few principals, although not the school I wound up in. Competition was fierce. I wound up in a borough I didn't initially want to teach in, but as they say everything happens for a reason and I love my school and students. That's something you may have to think about if you want to go the gen Ed route.

    If you are in NY, and can you tell me how you need only a few courses to get another cert in sped or early childhood? I know they used to do it years ago but I heard they stopped.

    In answering your questions directly, I would get a cert that I know would make me marketable, but also happy.
     

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