Worried About Offers

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by Nab, Jun 17, 2016.

  1. Nab

    Nab Companion

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    Jun 17, 2016

    I wrote more in another thread in the "General Education" area. But, I'm wondering - is anyone else worried about getting a job offer?

    If you've gotten (and taken) a job offer - was it the school/school district you wanted? It's been suggested that I just take my first offer, work there for at least half a year, and if I don't like it - try somewhere else.

    The best school district in my area is known for taking weeks or even a month to firmly let people know they have the job. Has anyone ever taken a job and than regretted it? I know someone who said yes to job, signed the papers, and ten minutes after signing the paper work - she got a call from her first choice district saying that she could chose between two schools! Oh, was she disappointed.
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2016
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  3. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    Jun 17, 2016

    Someone suggested you work half of a year? Was this person in education?
     
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  4. Nab

    Nab Companion

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    Jun 17, 2016

    It was a teacher who worked from August-December in one school district and hated it. She started applying in other school districts in October and moved to a new school district in January.
     
  5. cocobean

    cocobean Companion

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    Jun 17, 2016

    I received and accepted my first job offer. The school district is small, and the school appears to be a perfect fit for me. I was extremely lucky to find a job so quickly, BUT I moved to a smaller city about 2 hours from home because I knew the job market was better!
    Best of luck.
     
  6. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    Jun 17, 2016

    I don't know the rules where you live, but Texas districts don't have to let you out of your contract mid year. I would beware of this being your back up plan.
     
  7. Sarge

    Sarge Enthusiast

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    Jun 17, 2016

    I accepted my first offer. It was my first interview. That was 22 years ago. Still there.
     
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  8. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    Jun 17, 2016

    Personally, I wouldn't advise accepting an offer for a position that you feel you couldn't do a good job in or at a school that has a history of non-renewing many or most first year teachers. In my area anyway, it is extremely difficult to get hired again after non-renewal, so you want to avoid this at all costs (schools won't hire without contacting your current/most recent principal, and they ask if you've resigned in lieu of non-renewal on the application, so there isn't any way to get around it).

    That said, I wouldn't hold out for a "dream job" if you have reasonable offers on the table. Things aren't always what they seem either. I've taught in 3 different schools. I had reservations about jobs #1 and #3 and they both ended up being good places to work. I thought school #2 was my "dream job" and it ended up being an absolutely awful school; I wouldn't wish working there on my worst enemy. I actually considered trying to leave school #2 mid-year, but figured other principals wouldn't understand and I would blackball myself from other districts. As far as accepting a mid-year opening in other district, I figured if someone left that school mid-year, there must be something very wrong with that position as well!

    In the scenario where the person signed papers and then got an offer from her 1st choice school, I would have recommended calling that 1st choice first and saying something like, "I really want to work at xyz school and it's my first choice, but I have an offer I have to respond to by the end of today. I hope to hear from you by then, but if I haven't heard anything by 5, I'm going to have to take the other offer."
     
  9. NewTeacher2016

    NewTeacher2016 Companion

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    Jun 18, 2016

    .
     
    Last edited: May 28, 2017
  10. Nab

    Nab Companion

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    Jun 18, 2016

    My main worry is this: I have been recommended for a job in a school district 40 minutes from my home. I have been asked to go to their school board to do a background check and fill out paperwork on the at 10 am on the 20th. I'm not really sure I want the job, though. I wouldn't mind starting there for 2 or 3 years and than moving on. But, the school and school district just doesn't feel like me. It is a very small school (6th-8th grade) of roughly 500 students. The school district is currently being sued for several reasons and the several schools are under investigation for child molestation . The school I may have a job at has one computer lab with twenty computers from the mid-2000s, no smart boards, and textbooks from ten years ago. The school is also known to have MAJOR discipline issues, which are ignored by administration.

    And yet, I feel I should take the job, because I'm super scared I won't have a job come August. (School starts in my area between August 9th-August 11th.) Jobs in my area are rare and hard to come by; a lot of school districts hire people they know. (I've had 8 interviews in 6 weeks and haven't heard back from 5 of the schools. When I contacted a couple of the schools, I was told that Human Resources are still working on things.) It isn't unheard of for my preferred school district to call people two weeks before school starts to let them know they have the job. I'm also worried that I'll wait for a job that just won't come.

    So, I sort of feel like I should take the middle school job and try my best to improve myself and help my students grow in anyway possible.
     
  11. Pi-R-Squared

    Pi-R-Squared Connoisseur

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    Jun 18, 2016

    Three years ago, I went on 3 interviews and was offered a job on the 3rd one. This May, I was non-renewed and have just been on 1 interview so far. I say go ahead and take the job. Don't hold out on something that may or may not happen. It's better to be employed than not. Yeah, and I'm still bitter about my non-renewal.
     
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  12. Nab

    Nab Companion

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    Jun 19, 2016

    I know you are right. It's best to take the job and gain some much needed experience. Like I said above, if things don't go well - I can always leave once my contract is up. And maybe working in a school with little technology and major discipline issues will help me improve as a teacher.
     
  13. Clay Morgan

    Clay Morgan Rookie

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    Jun 21, 2016

    I kind of view things a little differently.

    I'm seeking my first teaching job, on an alternative license. The way I view it, I need two things while in my first job:
    1. An opportunity/environment in which I can do excellent work.
    2. To complete the work to become fully certified.
    Each requires a particular environment and that may not necessarily match up to my "dream environment." As I go through the process, consider positions to apply to, and go through what interviews I've landed thus far, the thing in my mind isn't "Is this where I want to teach?" it is rather, "Can I make a mark that gets my career started on the right foot? or Can I excel and complete my regular licensure here?"
     
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  14. artlovefood

    artlovefood New Member

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    Jun 22, 2016

    I'm wary of that too. Even if you aren't technically breaking any contracts, you are burning bridges...it's a delicate tightrope any teacher who loathes their workplace have to consider: can I afford to bail and burn bridges, or stick with a bad job?
    My last position was so awful. Even though I stuck with it until the end of the year, my director decided it would be a wonderful idea to write me off as an assistant for my long term summer sub on the last week during graduation (mind you, this was 5 days before my official last day on my resignation!), and lock me in an empty room to prep summer activities I wouldn't even be there for. So I literally walked out on them and drove home that morning. Luckily it was a Non Public, the company policy was not able to give any recommendations, so I had nothing to lose except my workbooks and work friends. I have seen teachers literally bail out of their jobs despite signing contracts, but that's a tough call. I wouldn't risk it unless you could get away with it without risking your credential and credibility. Not to mention how difficult it is to explain a few short months of teaching!
     

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