World Civ Centers

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by Historyteaching, Jul 29, 2010.

  1. Historyteaching

    Historyteaching Cohort

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2007
    Messages:
    724
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 29, 2010

    Alrighty...I need a bit of a boost in thinking here..

    I am wanting to conduct my world civilization high school class in the form of centers. I want students to be more responsible for their work than the standard lecturing. Yes I will be doing some of that, but I want them to get the info in other ways.

    I'm needing some ideas of centers..I would like to have 4. I have a SmartBoard so one center could have Ppt up for FIB, the students can flip through the slides themselves. Another idea I had was to use bellringer questions or types of questions to do some research on the computers in the classroom.

    I've also thought of something to do with mapping, I think they need to know locations of places they are learning about....any other ideas? Id like to rotate a few so its not the same thing each time we get to a new topic/unit...:thanks::thanks::thanks:
     
  2.  
  3. INteacher

    INteacher Aficionado

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2007
    Messages:
    3,765
    Likes Received:
    1

    Jul 29, 2010

    Here are a few centers I use and I will just generalize so you can use them for any time period

    *art - depending on the time period, they look at art and are asked questions such as "How is the conflict of religion shown in this Mannerism style painting?", or "How did Dada art reflect the time period?" or very simply, "How do you thing this art work connects to history?"

    *music - questions very similar to the above, students listen to period music

    *primary sources reading center - I do lots of different things with this center - simply reading and answering questions, primary sources covering same event with two different points of view then ask students to analyze why each writer experienced the event differently

    * timeline - each group that visits the station enters on event on the timeline to explain event, what change was created and historical importance of event

    *people - if you unit deals with many historical people, I do the same thing as the timeline but with people

    *food - again this station isn't used as often but the kids LOVE it. I bring in food tasting for the unit. I usually only do this with the Columbian Exchange and the second IR

    *military station - again used very selectively and again one of the most popular.

    Hope this helps
     
  4. Historyteaching

    Historyteaching Cohort

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2007
    Messages:
    724
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 29, 2010

    Love it..I had thought of the food idea..I used it in my global studies class for freshman and did something like that last year, bringing in rice during the Asia unit. You have my head working overtime. thanks so much.
     
  5. Historyteaching

    Historyteaching Cohort

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2007
    Messages:
    724
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 29, 2010

    *military station - again used very selectively and again one of the most popular.




    What is this one?
     
  6. INteacher

    INteacher Aficionado

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2007
    Messages:
    3,765
    Likes Received:
    1

    Jul 29, 2010

    I use this station when we are dealing with wars such as the 100 Years War, English Civil War, WWI, and also during the rise of Nationalism/Militarism. The 100 Years War military station includes types of weapons used, life of a solider during the time (usually a primary source doc) maps of battles, changes in warfare and war results. Students are asked questions about the war, about the items in the stations and usually some type of write up.
     
  7. Historyteaching

    Historyteaching Cohort

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2007
    Messages:
    724
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 29, 2010

    Do you find the centers helping students to retain the information ? The movement in the room instead of sitting for 90% of the time is helpful?
     
  8. ancientcivteach

    ancientcivteach Habitué

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2006
    Messages:
    771
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 29, 2010

    INteacher - how do you use the centers during class? Is this for when they are finished or do you have a regular time put aside for it?
     
  9. INteacher

    INteacher Aficionado

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2007
    Messages:
    3,765
    Likes Received:
    1

    Jul 29, 2010


    I really do think my students get a lot from my centers or else I wouldn't do them :p I take a lot of time preparing, gathering information and writing up the activities to go along with each station. I know my students are all activity engaged in doing history with the stations. I do include questions about the stations on my unit tests and sometimes an essay question (What did you learn about the 100 Years War from the information found in the military station?). My students really enjoy these activities and the movement involved. I use stations in my World History classes, mostly freshman, and with my US history classes made up of juniors with great success :)
     
  10. Soccer Dad

    Soccer Dad Cohort

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2008
    Messages:
    565
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 30, 2010

    How often do you use these stations? I work with 40 minute periods so I'd probably have to use 2 periods to achieve the same success right?
     
  11. INteacher

    INteacher Aficionado

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2007
    Messages:
    3,765
    Likes Received:
    1

    Jul 30, 2010

    On the days we do stations, it is the activity of the day. We usually do stations towards the end of the unit as a way to synthesis all the information we've learned. I usually have at least 6 stations and students in groups of 4 or 5.

    Right now I have 6 units I use the stations for in World and 5 in US. I think these are really good numbers in that we don't do so many they get tired of them but just enough so they ususally are pretty excited. I only have 45 min periods :( so it does take two days. I have to cut out test review/review game when we do stations but my students don't seem to mind.

    Another teacher in my dept creates her stations very differently. Her students move fast through her stations so she usually does get finished in one day aa she uses the stations more as a test review. Each one of her stations can probably be completed in about 5minutes whereas I go for using the stations for indepth material and additional learning. I usually give 15 minutes per station.

    The first one I created covered the Renaissance and Reformation which I think was proabably one of the easiest ones to do. I have a station about people, art of course, Luther and the Diet of Worms, Printing Press, Peace of Augsburg/Council of Trent, and Protestant and Catholic faiths.

    My kids really enjoy the stations and I truly believe it helps them by doing history :)
     
  12. Ron6103

    Ron6103 Habitué

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2008
    Messages:
    838
    Likes Received:
    7

    Jul 30, 2010

    I have never used these sort of centers before, and have been following this conversation with great interest. I'm trying to get a good picture of the sort of work the kids do at each station (I realize that depends on the topic, but still), and am having trouble.

    Are they just answering questions based on what they read/see at the station? Or how exactly does this work? If you have any of these typed out (even just the directions or accompanying activity) would anyone mind sharing an example perhaps?
     
  13. INteacher

    INteacher Aficionado

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2007
    Messages:
    3,765
    Likes Received:
    1

    Jul 30, 2010

    Using my example of the Ren & Ref,

    *at the people station - I have 5 outline of heads with names of people from the unit. Each group picks a head/person and then fills up the head with things about the person. At this station, one person writes the answers but all students contribute to the finished product.

    *art station - students look at Ren paintings (I have 5 copies of paintings so each student looks at one painting at a time). Each student will individually examine each painting looking for Ren or Northern Ren characteristics and determine whether the painting is Itl or Northern Ren. When they have examined all five, they write a brief paragraph comparing and constrasting Itl and Northern Ren

    *Luther station - they read primary sources covering the Diet of Worms and then answer questions. They do parts of this station together, they read the PS together, discuss the questions but each student must write their own answers. They can NOT copy answers. It they do, they get a zero for the entire activity.

    *Printing Press- this is just a looking, reading and touching station. They read a bio of Guttenberg, I have some old letters from a newspaper, map of spread of written word, diagram of old printing press, pictures of Guttenberg bible, and a few other things I can't remember. I think it is important to have at least one "fun" station where there isn't a required response.

    *Peace of Aug/Council of Trent - this station requires the most work as this are two of the most important outcomes of the Reformation. Students read summaries of both of these and then answer questions in a paragraph format. They are allowed to discuss everything before they answer. Questions have to deal mostly with what they think will happen as a result of these two events.

    *Faith stations - this is a compare/constrast of faith. This is just a basic question and answer station.

    I hope this explains this well enough for you to understand. My students do really get a lot from stations and usually can remember more from these activities then from anything else in class.

    I do grade their work - I don't give a completion grade or a group grade. I try to balance out the number of stations where they work together against the ones they do on their own.
     
  14. Brendan

    Brendan Fanatic

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2004
    Messages:
    2,974
    Likes Received:
    1

    Jul 30, 2010

    My stations are more the less the same than what INteacher does. Sometimes, what I'll do instead of the stations is have each group assigned to a station I would do a topic on and then they have to research the topic and present to the class. My honors students do their own research, but my CP students get a reading to help them. Also, my Honors students are allowed more Freedom in choosing what they do for their Interactive presentations/projects. I only do this once a term, however, because it takes much longer to do than a simple Jig Saw group or stations activity.
     
  15. Rockguykev

    Rockguykev Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2008
    Messages:
    1,934
    Likes Received:
    257

    Jul 30, 2010

    I do stations but quite differently. I use them in my investigative activities for each unit. Here's an example of one: http://mrroughton.com/ColdCaseRome.aspx

    I absolutely agree with the general thought though that this is an opportunity for students to "do" history. I started off with the generic "stuff from the unit" centers but then slowly built up to the unified ones as shown above. It works fantastically well and is something I'd certainly like to expand. In fact, I may go back and remake the generic centers and have two per unit.
     
  16. Ron6103

    Ron6103 Habitué

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2008
    Messages:
    838
    Likes Received:
    7

    Aug 26, 2010

    I don't mean to bump an old thread needlessly, but I just wanted to say that I'm going to give these centers a shot. I'm trying it for the first time tomorrow with my World History I students. We are finishing a unit on Prehistory, so I have 6 stations....

    1. Map of the very first civilizations, map reading and question sheet to go with it.

    2. video station - 10 minute video clip on the discovery of the Iceman, with short questions

    3. document station - with short sources on the discovery of early sites like Catalhuyuk... reading questions to answer with it.

    4. Images station, with pictures of various early homonid skeletons, stone tools, etc.

    5. vocabulary station, with 10 key terms from the unit, and the groups must construct a Brain Chain of the terms

    6. virtual quiz station - practice quiz on the computer in game show form, with questions from the unit. each group competes for the high score.

    Thoughts on my choices for centers? Any suggestions perhaps?

    I hope it goes well.... I've never done anything quite like this before. But I appreciate the input. If it does go well, it will become a staple activity I hope.
     
  17. Brendan

    Brendan Fanatic

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2004
    Messages:
    2,974
    Likes Received:
    1

    Aug 26, 2010

    They look good, but I do them a little differently....I may have each station focused on a particular topic rather than a particular skill or task.
     
  18. INteacher

    INteacher Aficionado

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2007
    Messages:
    3,765
    Likes Received:
    1

    Aug 27, 2010



    I think they sound great - I might borrow this for next year :) This time period is my least favorite to teach and therefore probably the lessons I spend the less amount of time coming up with different lessons and activities.

    I hope this goes well for you. The first time I did centers, my problem was I didn't really plan well for the amount of time each center took so I had some kids done really quickly and some could not complete the task the allotted time. Let us know how it goes :)
     
  19. Ron6103

    Ron6103 Habitué

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2008
    Messages:
    838
    Likes Received:
    7

    Aug 27, 2010

    Well, things went okay. The students enjoyed the activities and I think they learned a lot, but timing was a problem. In approximately 50 minutes, we got through only 3 of the 6 stations. I was hoping for 10 minutes per station, but that clearly wasn't enough time, so I ended up changing it to 15. But at 15 minutes per station, it will take multiple days.

    How much time do you give per center? Do I need to make the activities shorter perhaps?
     
  20. Ms. Geography

    Ms. Geography Comrade

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2006
    Messages:
    250
    Likes Received:
    1

    Aug 27, 2010

    How do you set up your classroom for centers? I'm interesting in trying centers, but need the visual so I can see where & how to do it.

    TIA
     
  21. Ms.History

    Ms.History Rookie

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2010
    Messages:
    75
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 27, 2010

    Ron6103 - What clip do you use for the Iceman discovery? If you don't mind posting some other specifics on your stations, I'd love some more details on them; they sound great!
     
  22. Ron6103

    Ron6103 Habitué

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2008
    Messages:
    838
    Likes Received:
    7

    Aug 27, 2010

    Sure, I'll be happy to give specifics....

    The Iceman clip came from Prentice Hall's "World History" teaching resources DVD. The DVD contains short (roughly 10 minute) video clips on a wide array of subjects. For textbook produced material, it's actually quite good, and brief enough to hold interest.

    For the maps, I just pull blank outline maps from the internet (just try typing outline map of __________ into google). I then build questions based on the map, or have the students fill in the map based on locations.

    For the vocab, I borrowed the activity from another teacher on here. --> http://mrroughton.com/brainchain.aspx

    For the images, I again use Google. Tons of pictures there, and I just print them off with my color printer at home.

    For the computer quiz station, we have software at the school called QuizShow (or something like that) that lets you create a virtual game show. It's really quite neat, but can be done with all sorts of different software.
     
  23. Historyteaching

    Historyteaching Cohort

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2007
    Messages:
    724
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 27, 2010

    We started stations this week, doing a basic review of geography items. We gave four days with four stations, students worked at their own pace as long as they were done by Thursday. Any makeup will be done on Friday (Just not this Friday for this particular section)

    Stations were:

    1. Mapping continents, oceans, prime mer., equator, scale, compass rose

    2. vocab flash cards (index cards)

    3. 5 themes of Me (using 5 themes of geography) Answered questions about themselves

    4. Physical and Politicial Maps w/a couple questions for each.

    We started with 4 to ease them into the idea of stations and how they worked. We wanted to do a quick review over basic skills and info that they had learned in middle school. This was also good to start with because if they didn't understand how the centers worked, it wasn't a big problem because the information is already known.

    The first day they were a little deer in headlights but started getting the idea and did fine. Why we are spending 4 days is because each unit will last 2-4 weeks depending on the region. We have plenty of time to do this amount of time in stations plus have teacher centered classwork, as well as video if necessary and testing.
     
  24. Soccer Dad

    Soccer Dad Cohort

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2008
    Messages:
    565
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 28, 2010

    Ron-- it sounds like you created great stations!

    I'm definitely using the stations too this year. Because my global classes will be taught regionally this year, I decided to use almost entire week for review of each region using this breakdown:

    1- Geography
    2- Early History & Civilizations ("Golden Age")
    3- Age of Imperialism & Empires
    4- Nationalism
    5- Modern Problems

    Within each stations, students will: analyze photos, write short journal entries, watch clips on laptops (IF I can get them for that week), vocabulary exercises, etc.

    I know this is going to take days to do because it's SO much material but I want to test 2-3 times per unit. For instance: Unit = Latin America, Test #1 = Geography, Golden Age (Aztec, Maya and Inca), Test #2 = European Colonialism, Test #3 = Nationalism, Essay = Modern Problems and possibly a cumulative exam. Of course, this is going to eat up a lot of time.
     
  25. INteacher

    INteacher Aficionado

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2007
    Messages:
    3,765
    Likes Received:
    1

    Aug 28, 2010

    Soccerdad, I think this is a great way to culmanate your units and I think your have created a great timeline for your stations. And while it will take a few days, I think your students will really get a great understanding of each region. I also think your stations will work great for students because the topic of each station will remain the same and will enhance the historical meaning to each region your class studies.
     
  26. Soccer Dad

    Soccer Dad Cohort

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2008
    Messages:
    565
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 28, 2010

    Thanks Inteacher! This is my first time teaching Global History regionally and I'm worried about having students understand the timeline of events because I know it'll be confusing to backtrack from region to region. However, I'm ecstatic to try something new because I think it'll be so much easier to make connections between things and truly understand why our world is the way it is and, hopefully, establish a greater understanding of why history is so darn important!
     
  27. Brendan

    Brendan Fanatic

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2004
    Messages:
    2,974
    Likes Received:
    1

    Aug 30, 2010

    I plan on doing stations more often with my freshman. Do you guys tend to collect and grade them or just hope that the kids do them?
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. waterfall,
  2. Ima Teacher
Total: 412 (members: 3, guests: 379, robots: 30)
test