Working with students with no academic goals

Discussion in 'Special Education Archives' started by KLaMonda, Sep 4, 2003.

  1. KLaMonda

    KLaMonda Rookie

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    Sep 4, 2003

    I have 5 students with Autism, and the majority of my students have academic goals, except for one. He is 6, non-verbal, very low functioning, with all independent functioning goals, so I'm having a hard time figuring out how to run my classroom effectively since all of my other students are working on academics.
    For example, when the other 4 students are sitting down working on addition, I don't know what to do with this other student. I hate to word it like that, but...
    He needs either myself or my para sitting with him working with manipulatives or something, but our other 4 students are just as demanding.
    How can I make this work so that I'm meeting everyone's needs? I know that resource room teachers must feel the same way, trying to work with students of all levels at the same time. So how do you do it?
     
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  3. clarnet73

    clarnet73 Moderator

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    Sep 4, 2003

    why can't you write him some academic goals? seems if they're in school, they ought to be doing academics part of the time, right? (Sorry if I don't understand the situation correctly, please correct if I'm wrong!) I work in a day school for kids with autism, and ALL of our kids do academics part of the day, even if it's just one or two of our 4 sessions. Can you set up some self-checking things maybe?
     
  4. KLaMonda

    KLaMonda Rookie

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    Sep 4, 2003

    I inherited his IEP from his school last year, so I'm just following that. It's not due until March, so I have to live with these goals until then. He is very low functioning, so he isn't capable of much yet. He does not pick up a pencil, he does not show interest in anything, and if you try to do anything hand over hand with him, he's not even giving an effort- he's letting you do all the work- his eyes will be focused at the ceiling.

    The kind of goals he has is to be able to button/unbutton his pants after using the restroom, say bye-bye at the end of the day, play appropriately with classroom toys, use his picture schedule, and put away his belongings at the beginning of the day etc.
    He's not potty trained either, so a lot of time is wasted bringing him to the bathroom.

    Personally, I think he should be in a pre-k ESE classroom rather than mine, where they do a lot of social play things, and primary stuff, like coloring/use of manipulatives, but they placed him with me, so I have to figure it out I guess.
     
  5. clarnet73

    clarnet73 Moderator

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    Sep 4, 2003

    Can you focus on pre-reading skills... matching puzzles/letter/number/color/etc, pointing with you when you read with him, etc? It's academic, and stuff you'd do with them anyway... no harm in exposing him to stuff. :)
     
  6. Seich30

    Seich30 Comrade

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    Sep 5, 2003

    He probably wasn't placed in an ESE pre-k class due to his age. Normally he would go to Developmentally Primary for kindergarten, but you probably got him because of his label Autistic (that is what you teach, right?). I can understand your frustration though, I had a child (who ended up being PMH--once we got him tested)in my room for a whole year. Anyways as an ESE pre-k teacher, I would definitely work on exposing him to letters, numbers, colors, shapes, etc. My kids love file folder games--matching, sorting. Have him color some pictures for the letters of the alphabet. After he colors independantly, you could go over the picures. I've made so many fun things using the boardmaker program. I'd be happy to send you anything that you think would be helpful, send me a private message and I'll see what I can do. With his disability, I'm sure he has some sensory issues, what kinds of things does he like to do?
     
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2003
  7. Unregistered

    Unregistered Guest

    Sep 18, 2003

    This child is capabale of learning sooooo much. Does he use sign language? Has anyone comeleted an ABLLS on him?

    Please visit this website www.verbalbehaviornetwork.com
    It's a great sight for teachers/therapists who work with children who have autism...

    Please read up on Verbal Behavior...... There is soooo much that you can teach this little guy. Also, if you get the chance - please attend workshops presented by Dr. Vince Carbone.

    When my son's teacher started using verbal behavior with him - our family's life changed for the better.

    If you (the teacher) feel as if you can't do this at the moment, please give the parent of the child the following
    websites:www.verbalbehaviornetwork.com
    www.poac.net

    Thanks
     
  8. abrusca

    abrusca New Member

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    Oct 12, 2006

    Hi, I have a class with 10 students with autism, 2 of which sound like the student that you have described. They are both in kindergarten and have not many academic skills. I also have only one assistant in my class so it is a difficult situation to provide support to all of the students. I agree with others that teaching matching of colors, shapes, and teaching numbers and letters along with their sounds is very beneficial. Pairing the instruction with music has been very helpful, particularly with the numbers and letter names and sounds. I have several students from last school year that knew no letters, sounds or numbers at all, and after these programs know every letter and most of the sounds. Not all students enjoy the music, but the repetition and picture cues really have an effect. We use a couple of great programs in the class. One is called ZooPhonics. the other Im not sure what it is really called but I think maybe Jolly Trolley. It teaches colors, shapes, letters, sequencing, and numbers. I don't just stick to the objectives because I know they have potential. We work on objectives and add the academics as well so they will be able to make progress in later years.
     
  9. wsrecords

    wsrecords Rookie

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    Oct 17, 2006

    i also suggest seeing if there is a way that you could do something like centers...you get your 4 other students with math while he is listening to a book on tape or something, then t witch them out. this way you can work with him too. i would also suggest whenever possible to have him be doing an activity simluar to what you are doing. so your students are working on addition...can he give you a certain number of bears...and so on. you will be doing two things at once, but if it works then it works.
     

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