working with students outside the school day

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by bethechange, Feb 9, 2007.

  1. bethechange

    bethechange Comrade

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    Feb 9, 2007

    As part of my job this year, I do a lot of home visits, which is new to me, but which I really like because it gives you a much more complete picture of the students' and families' needs.

    Here's my dilemna. I've developed a very close and positive relationship with one family in particular. I work with their child both in school for part of the day every day and at his home once a week. The family has expressed happiness at his progress and wants to hire me to do some private hours with him on the outside.

    The passionate, emotional part of me is excited at this prospect of having some time away from the constraints of school, objectives, and keeping DATA all the time. I think he really needs some time to just play and be a kid, but in a positive and structured way, and I think I could really help not just him, but the whole family with that. On the other hand, the rational part of me is a little wary of blurring the line between having a personal and professional relationship with the family. Not to mention the whole burnout possibility.

    Does anyone have any experience with this sort of situation either way? I am really confused about what to do.
     
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  3. educatingme

    educatingme Companion

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    Feb 9, 2007

    I'm glad you asked this

    For the first time, the 19 yr. old boy (who just happens to have Down Syndrome) I currently work with is reading. His parents are elated, but worried that he'll lose all of our hard work over the summer...not to mention the fact that they're hoping we can continue progress. Anyway, I thought it was a great idea...I never thought about overstepping professional boundaries...until you mentioned it!
     
  4. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Feb 9, 2007

    We are not allowed to tutor our own students (i.e. get paid for working with them outside of class). This could be seen as a definite conflict of interest--you should investigate whether or not it would be allowed by your school.
     
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2007
  5. bethechange

    bethechange Comrade

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    Feb 9, 2007

    I actually already have done that (checked with my school) and it is "allowed, but not recommended." When I questioned this thought further, the concensus seemed to be because working extra hours might "burn me out."

    I don't even really want to get paid, because I enjoy the child and family and I don't want to work on school stuff either. More play-based socal intervention and interaction and helping to problem solve with the parents strategies that could help them with both play and difficult behaviors at home.

    I've racked my brain trying to come up with community agencies or volunteers/students that could help them, but to no avail. We live in a pretty small town.
     
  6. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Feb 9, 2007


    That's the same policy we have.

    But in our school, it's not a question of burnout. The feeling is that kids are free to come to us for extra help before or after school, free of charge. Therefore, it would be conflict of interest for us to tutor them privately when the same service is available for free.

    During the years I was a SAHM they recommended me frequently as a tutor. But now that I'm back, our kids are off limits.
     
  7. JaimeMarie

    JaimeMarie Moderator

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    Feb 9, 2007

    Back when in the summer of 2001 I picked up a tutoring job (I was paid by the school). I tutored a 15 yr old boy for 20 hrs a week at his house. I than went and back to college and graduated that Dec. I subbed for the rest of the year. From June 2002 to the end of August 2003 (school year 35 hrs, summer 20 hrs) with this same student. I did not get burnt out on teaching. but by the end of the third summer, I was getting sick of being with that student so much. The last two summers I was a job coach not a tutor. It was a lot of fun, but a lot of work. Some how I ended up managing the ice cream pallor (but not paid for it) that he worked at that last summer. Of course I had worked there for 10 yrs at that point. So instead of paying me, my student was paid. but I did most of the work. I didn't mind, my sister also worked their that summer.
    Anyway the whole point to this long post, was to say that if you won't be working with the student next year, than go for it. But you may get burnt out if you continue with him over the summer, and than have him again next year.
     

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