Working with SPED Teachers/Therapists

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by Miss J. Pre-K, Dec 4, 2008.

  1. Miss J. Pre-K

    Miss J. Pre-K Comrade

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    Dec 4, 2008

    I'm a first year teacher in a Headstart Pre-K classroom. Four of my children are identified and have IEPS, and probably two more will be soon (evals are done, waiting for the meetings). I have an OT, PT, and SLP come into my room regularly to work with my kids with IEPS. I'm just wondering if it's normal for them to work with that child in a corner somewhere (or even in the supply closet--I try to discourage this) and then not tell me, the teacher, what they have been working on. I would like to know so I can do similar activities with these kids when the therapists are not around, but it's like pulling teeth to get them to tell me what they're doing. Sometimes it's obvious, but sometimes, especially with the speech, it's not. I've even suggested that they could do some activities with a small group of students (some of the kids need socialization help), and none of them are open to working with more than one child at a time.

    Is this normal? I would like to set up a good relationship with these people, as two out of three are in my class twice a week. I try to tell them new things I have noticed about the children. Why won't they reciprocate?
     
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  3. SpecialPreskoo

    SpecialPreskoo Moderator

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    Dec 4, 2008

    It is normal for them to only want to work with a child 1:1 but they should be open to giving you ideas and such so you can continue the activities. If you have a copy of their IEP (which you should have) then you should be in the know on what they are working on, but they should be able to give you specific activities that they are doing in order to meet those goals.
     
  4. Mrs_Barrett

    Mrs_Barrett Cohort

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    Dec 4, 2008

    Yes, it's very common for working 1:1 with certain students. THe IEP will give a jist of what they are working on but won't be as specific as talking to them. Do the parents get any hints on what they are working on? I honestly don't have a clue on what my SLP are doing with my students and I don't care. I only have a 3 hour day, and there isn't time for 1:1 with a student to practice those skills.
     
  5. monsieurteacher

    monsieurteacher Aficionado

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    Dec 4, 2008

    Generally, the SLP/OT/PT all have their roles. If it's anything like it is here, there's a long waiting list. Their job is to work with individual children. It's not like a TA where they are assigned to the classroom. They are not supposed to work with small groups, unless they have paperwork that says they are able to work with every one of those children (this of course includes referrals AND testing... not a simple permission slip).

    The other thing is that you should not be concerned with what the SLP/OT/PT are doing, as their jobs are different from yours. You are to provide the curriculum to the students. You could ask an SLP what they were doing, but the truth is, they've had many courses to take on what they're doing and they likely don't have time to explain it to you... especially when they have to run off to their next client.
     
  6. JanH

    JanH New Member

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    Dec 4, 2008

    That is too bad she will not talk with you. I am a Speech Therapist that goes into the Self-contained classrooms and work with the students in small groups. Some are autistic, some non-verbal; different abilitity levels. Some of what we do is very specific to the child, like teaching correct tongue placement to make a specific sound. You could say to her that you want to know so you could support what she is doing with the children during your classtime and if she has any ideas of how you can help, to let her know. I always want to know how my students are functioning in a larger group or in the classroom (some of the higher functioning kids go out to general ed. for part of the day), so I may go observe them in that setting. All of the therapists come and go into the classrooms and we try to keep one another informed. You should have a general idea; maybe she could meet with you quickly before/after school to review what areas they are working in (articulation, language). Good luck!
     
  7. Miss J. Pre-K

    Miss J. Pre-K Comrade

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    Dec 5, 2008

    We're supposed to be doing inclusion . . . so yes, I think it is my business to know what they're doing with my kids. They are not supposed to take the child out of the classroom because legally, they are not allowed to be alone with students (this is what they've told me). I understand they have been specially trained, but I also have an advanced degree, and am capable of doing some of the things they are doing, if they would just tell me. I also have to write up "disability activities" (I hate the sound of that) that I am working on each month for each child with an IEP. I guess I'm just used to working together with therapists--in my old center there was much more communication and cooperative teaching.

    Sigh, I guess I'll just have to keep pestering them.
     
  8. SpecialPreskoo

    SpecialPreskoo Moderator

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    Dec 5, 2008

    Oh, well if they are SUPPOSED to be doing inclusion, then yes, remind them of that and the legalities you mentioned.

    Stay on them!
     

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