Working with an immature child

Discussion in 'General Education' started by renard, Dec 2, 2015.

  1. renard

    renard Companion

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    Dec 2, 2015

    Can someone offer strategies on how to teach patience and carefulness to an immature 1st grader? He's a lovely boy, but simply immature. He's impulsive, rushes through all reading, cannot blend final sounds because of jumping to a conclusion, and gets mad at me for correcting errors ("mommy doesn't make me"). He cries and runs away at the smallest thing. No disabilities. I have been assigned to him (para) specifically to improve this.
     
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  3. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

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    Dec 2, 2015

    From the description, I'm seeing a lot of positives concerning this student, although I agree, he needs to learn to socially cooperate in a classroom setting. Looking at the positives, concerning his blending, it's possible he might be demonstrating a use of non-declarative memory; the declarative memorization of decoding and possibly context clues have become habitual and are working together as one procedural skill. Because of this he is not looking at each sound individually one step at a time. Now they need to be perfected. I would try allowing him to keep reading through the sentence to see if he discovers his original hypothesis was incorrect, then encourage him to backtrack and retry another hypothesis. I would positively reinforce his efforts as being almost correct; ("did you sound out the beginning of the word correctly?--yes, you did") and conclude with ("did that word make sense in the story?") It's kind of like a kid learning to throw a baseball. They eventually don't think through every single movement, but they still need to iron out quite a few edges before they can throw effectively. When I have a student with this behavior, I keep thinking, Albert Einstein started out this way, too.
    Impulsiveness has many causes, but often it is a lower brain reaction without restraint from the upper brain, still very typical for this age level. From the above, I had a sketchy intuition that perhaps his upper brain is jumping ahead to a course of action that unfortunately leads to negative consequences; in other words, he's experimenting to see what results in a rewarding or non-rewarding situation. He might be finding that his oral responses and crying help manipulate the situation. (I once had a student who was an absolute expert at this!) I would wait until he calms down, then discuss what he did and how he might improve the situation. I would use reflective responses (rewording what he said) to encourage him to talk and think about the situation. ( If he said, "I felt like flying a paper airplane." I might say, "You felt like flying a paper airplane.") I would also use "whenever" messages. ("Whenever we fly paper airplanes during class, it makes it difficult for everyone to learn new things.") This, again, could be a positive skill that just needs tweaked somewhat. If he's already learning how to judge his actions and make decisions, wow! With encouragement along the way to make appropriate judgements and predict consequences appropriately, just think how great a skill this will be as an adult!
     
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  4. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Dec 2, 2015

    Great post Obadiah!
     
  5. renard

    renard Companion

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    Dec 2, 2015

    Wow, thank you! That is SO helpful and detailed. I will talk it over with his T tomorrow. Thanks. Yes, he's a great kid - kind and caring. Just a bit immature. He's also an identical twin, and his brother performs much higher academically. I'm wondering if he feels the comparison.
     
  6. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

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    Off the subject, but this reminded me of a funny story that happened when I taught an identical twin whose brother was in the other classroom. The twin in my room, every time he learned something new, he'd quietly giggle. One day, he didn't giggle at all! I sent a quick note over to the other teacher asking if perhaps the two had switched places. As it turned out, they hadn't; he was just in an unusual mood that day.
     
  7. Sarahhoffman

    Sarahhoffman New Member

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    Dec 4, 2015

    You should try to study such student very well. You should try to study all students like and dislike .Always you should behave through lovely. You should try to study about what ever they liked. Through love you can teach such students.
     

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