Working on Beginning Blends/Digraphs

Discussion in 'Elementary Education Archives' started by glitzern02, Sep 27, 2005.

  1. glitzern02

    glitzern02 Companion

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    Sep 27, 2005

    I am tutoring a little boy in first grade, and he is having trouble with some beginning blends and digraphs. For example, he confuses "ch", "sh", and "th" alot and he has trouble with "br", "tr", "str", etc. What are some different activities I could do with him to help this? Thanks! :)

    By the way, he also has trouble with the soft c and soft g concept. Is there anything I could do with that? Thanks!
     
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  3. meri78

    meri78 Rookie

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    Sep 29, 2005

    hi-i make up songs & raps to help the kids learn the h blends. anything that is silly & fun will usually help them remember it! for the r blends, i will often make up motions (for example rubbing your arms while saying the br sound, pretending like you're cold) that the children can do w/me to help them remember their sounds. i have a blend practice chart that i pass out to the students also. it has each blend (2 & 3 letters) & a corresponding picture, for example the letters fr & then a picture of a frog. this helps the students to make connections by using words they already know. hope this helps-good luck!!!! -meri
     
  4. hanvan

    hanvan Connoisseur

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    Sep 29, 2005

    I found something called the "H Brothers"
    Ch is the choo choo brother
    SH is the quiet brother
    WH is the whistle brother
    TH is the thinking brother
    We do hand motions and saying th th thinking brother etc...seems to work pretty well.
     
  5. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Sep 29, 2005

    Blends with /r/ ARE tricky. For one thing, /r/ itself is tricky: most of us pronounce it as an alveolar retroflex sound, with the tongue tip a little behind the upper front teeth and pointed up, but a lot of people pronounce /r/ with the tongue tip behind the LOWER front teeth and pointed DOWN. Fortunately, the /r/ sounds that result are nearly identical. What's more, it can be hard to hear blends with /r/ as blends or SEQUENCES of sound - /b/ then /r/ - because the sounds are so often coarticulated, or pronounced at the same time, like a "b" and an "r" printed one on top of the other. And many speakers of English pronounce "tr" as though the first sound were "ch", not "t" (a lot of them are probably people whose tongue tips point down for /r/); because there are no words in English that begin with a "ch" followed by "r" that's generally not a problem for a fluent reader of English, but I'm sure it confuses the socks off a kid who can't figure out why "tree" doesn't begin with the same letters as "cheep".

    Is it that he's confusing /br/ with /tr/ with /str/, or is it that he's not getting the /r/?

    Does he have the same problem with /l/ blends?
     
  6. meri78

    meri78 Rookie

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    Oct 2, 2005

    hanvan-i love your h brothers idea...i think i might steal it!! :) -meri
     

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