Work to do when finished work

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by SnowDaisy822, Aug 16, 2007.

  1. SnowDaisy822

    SnowDaisy822 Companion

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    Aug 16, 2007

    I need some ideas of stuff for kids to do when they finish their work. I'll have computers as an option and of course read, but what else. Last year I copied a ton of worksheets and they didn't use them at all so I wasted a bunch of paper. What do you guys do? Thanks!
     
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  3. iheart5thgrade

    iheart5thgrade Comrade

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    Aug 16, 2007

    Put the worksheets in a sealed manila envelope, titled the Mystery Envelope. Let them open it, and work on what's inside when they are through. Something about the excitement of opening something that's a secret makes the worksheets much more enjoyable for them!
     
  4. WindyCityGal606

    WindyCityGal606 Enthusiast

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    Folder Learning Centers so they can sharpen their skills...it'll keep them busy and working toward meeting the standards. They can take these types of centers to their seats.
     
  5. apple25

    apple25 Comrade

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    Discovery Schoolhouse has a great site for brain boosters:
    http://school.discovery.com/brainboosters/

    I'm going to print some out for my older kids.

    I'm also letting them work on other assignments, write in their journals, or do sodoku puzzles.
     
  6. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Aug 17, 2007

    Instead of copying lots of extra worksheets, put them into page protectors and have students use a grease pencil.
     
  7. MissFroggy

    MissFroggy Aficionado

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    Those riddles on Discovery are awesome! I am going to use some for math and literacy centers.

    Thanks!
     
  8. halpey1

    halpey1 Groupie

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    Aug 17, 2007

    My kids always have the same thing:
    1) Help a friend who needs help - work quietly
    2) Get a book from your book bin and read
    3) Work on a special project

    #3 comes from the Responsive Classroom Academic Choice philosophy... I usually only have 1 or 2 kids per year that fit into this category... these are kids that are chronic early finishers... I work with them to pick a special project... they work on a proposal and then when approved by me, they work on this project in their 'extra' choice... it's a great way to tell parents how you are differentiated for their 'gifted' child... :D
     
  9. sciencegirl

    sciencegirl Rookie

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    halpey1, what are some examples of special projects? I'm curious how you manage this in terms of helping them find something they're interested in & can work independently on. Also, do they just use resources in the classroom or does it require outside materials?
    Thanks for elaborating!
     
  10. halpey1

    halpey1 Groupie

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    Aug 17, 2007

    It's actually easier than you think - remember - this is only for the few (usually 2, MAYBE 3) kids who are chronic early finishers. Basically, you sit down with them and help them brainstorm some ideas - this is usually hooked into something they are interested in. It is usually done entirely in the classroom. Some examples might be: create a comic strip/book (about ANYthing, but usually something tied into the curriculum), create a brochure/poster, write a skit/play, then practice and perform it; the key here is CHOICE.

    For instance, if you are studying African Americans, you might tell them they can pick one person, research them, and then decide a way to demonstrate/share their learning... this product is up to them (Multiple Intelligences) - they can draw, write, perform, build, etc.

    As for planning, you need to create a form that works for you. Some things you might include are:

    My Topic:
    My Plan:
    I will need: (resources)
    I will make/create: (product)
    I will work on this when:

    I also have them reflect before sharing...
    My favorite part about working on this project:
    Something new I learned:
    etc.

    I hope this helps. It is incredibly motivating and really helps with discipline as the kids are totally engaged.
     
  11. sciencegirl

    sciencegirl Rookie

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    Sounds like a great idea. I'm not teaching homeroom this year, so I only have groups of kids for 45 mins as their science teacher. Different model entirely! But I know when I taught homeroom I usually had one kid like that... and I had all kinds of menus of work that was "must do/may do" and they'd fly through it all. I had a center of free choice activities like math puzzles, word searches, crossword puzzles, mystery pictures, Time for Kids magazines, etc, but I always wanted to give them more. I'll keep this in mind for the future. :)
     
  12. Mable

    Mable Enthusiast

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    Aug 17, 2007

    Functional Folders

    Folders that have been designed to target specific skills. Like math, writing, alphabetizing, punctuation, etc. Possibilities are endlesss.
     
  13. knittingbec

    knittingbec Comrade

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    I have "extra work folders" for each student. There's a list of activities to do when they finish work on one side of the folder... I don't have one of the lists on my home computer, but examples are:
    1. Re-read a story from our reading book. What story?____
    2. Make up a math word problem about our classroom.
    3. Read a Reading Counts book and take a quiz on it. Write your score here:____
    4. Write as many ways as you can to make the number ____
    5. Untie and tie your shoe 3 times.
    6. Choose 5 word wall words. Write them in ABC order. Write a sentence for each.
    7. Complete 3 worksheets from the other pocket of your Extra Work Folder. (Here, I put worksheets that I copied and didn't get to, fun sheets, etc.)

    I don't let them turn it in until all items are checked off...that way someone isn't doing all of the worksheets but none of the reading/non-worksheet activities. I change the lists as needed, either for the whole class or for individuals--maybe they need more or less challenge.
    Of course, reading and writing are always options!
     
  14. QueenB

    QueenB Rookie

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    Aug 19, 2007

    I keep any extra worksheets that I may not use in class. Especially tests. All of the worksheets are ones that they have seen before, and it's not graded, so they feel more comfortable doing it and they think it's cool to be able to "take a test" and not really have the pressure of test taking. They usually go for the worksheets that they've done the best on in the past. And that's fine, it's extra practice.
     
  15. buck8teacher

    buck8teacher Devotee

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    I had a "What to Do When I'm Done" Poster last year. I need to make one again, but here are some things I had:

    ***Check work folder for any unfinished work****

    1. Do flashcards by yourself or with a partner. I found these awesome dry-erase flashcards that they love. I also found these Rocket Minds cards at Big Lots that have a little dry erase board on it and students insert the questions, and can check them through this special screen. They loved it.

    2. Read from your bag of books and take Reading Counts Quizzes. I created an incentive plan for RC this year, so hopefully more of them will want to take quizzes.

    3. Spelling Word Find- I'm a member of ABC Teach and I would make word finds of the spelling words in cool animal shapes. I filed them away in my spelling binder so I didn't have to make them again and again.

    4. Trace and Write's for cursive practice.

    5. Free Journal- I had printed off a calendar of journal topics from Busy Teacher's Cafe and put them in a folder. Not to many kiddos used it, but I'm going to encourage it more this year and write back to the kids that wrote in their journal.

    6. Clean their desk--I had more kids start keeping their desk clean once they realized they could do it when they were done with an assigment.

    7. Monthly Packet- My grade level last year, I taught 2nd, had made up these monthly packets with seasonal worksheets, math practice, etc. They LOVED them and it was a great.

    8. Fastt Math- I love Fastt Math and so do the kids. I made a chart of when people could get on and on their day when they were done with something, they could do it.

    9. Free Reading Basket- This year I have a free reading basket of books that don't have RC quizzes but are still pretty neat, like choose your own endings, that I'll encourage them to use.

    Hope this helps!
     
  16. cmw

    cmw Groupie

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    Aug 19, 2007

    When I taught 4th I had a list posted of their options including current projects and work. (They always had the option of reading or working on the quarterly book reports or turning in a computer pass that they had earned.) I just saw a poster at Holcombs (teaching store) that had the different subjects listed and lines for the teacher to write the activity. That way it can be tailored daily or weekly to meet your needs. If I had a homeroom class I would've bought it but I'm teaching music this year with 20+ classes. :)
     
  17. buck8teacher

    buck8teacher Devotee

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    Aug 19, 2007

  18. ThirdGrade123

    ThirdGrade123 Companion

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    Aug 19, 2007

    I have a lot of similiar options for the kids when they finish their work. But, they ALL seem to gravitate to playing math games! (Even thought, I have LA games too!) It's great but I want them to enjoy other activities. Any suggestions?
     
  19. momtobaln

    momtobaln Rookie

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    Aug 19, 2007

    buck8teacher.... what is fastt math? It sounds interesting.
     
  20. love2teach

    love2teach Enthusiast

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    buck8, what is fasst math??
     
  21. NYSTeacher

    NYSTeacher Companion

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    I'm doing file folder games/activities. it'll be one of the options and they'd just go to the back of the room, grab one, and go back to their seats to complete it.

    As of right now, I don't plan on grading them, I'd jsut check them.
     
  22. buck8teacher

    buck8teacher Devotee

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    Fastt Math is a fact fluency building program that is available through Scholastic. It has the students do placement tests and then does a series of focus facts that the students are struggling with during daily ten minute sessions, with other facts thrown in. I love the program and it generates awesome time tests, and fact fluency grids that I send home to let parents know what facts their child has down and which ones they need more help with. It's a bit pricey, and luckily my district bought it and Reading Counts last year.
    http://www.tomsnyder.com/products/product.asp?SKU=FASFAS

    When students master the addition facts 0-9 they can move to 0-12 or to subtraction and then the older kids can do multiplication and division. I love it, and so do the kids, the games are so engaging and the can't wait for their fastt time.

    It's really meant for intervention purposes in my school but they all love it so much, they all do it, not just a certain few.
     
  23. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    Aug 19, 2007

    I just made my poster yesturday. I wrote:

    1. check your work. Can you make it better? Name and Number on your work.

    2. Study for test/quiz

    3. read a book

    4. AR test

    5. quietly clean your desk

    6. Work on your Catch-Up folder

    7. work on your brain bender if you landed on the homworkopoly spot

    8. Answer this weeks Young Einstein Club questions

    9. Write a letter to a friend or teacher

    10. Do you classroom job.
     
  24. lcluigs03

    lcluigs03 Cohort

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    Aug 19, 2007

    i copy worksheets. i know it's generic, but it's valuable stuff. they are enrichment sheets for our spelling. so...they get more practice. i haven't had a problem with students doing these, but can see how it could turn into a paper waste.

    i might switch it eventually, but for right now...this is the easiest for me.

    LC
     
  25. mrs100

    mrs100 Comrade

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    Aug 19, 2007

    I put a little twist on the worksheets. I have a "Challenge Center". Anytime my students finish something, they know to "read or challenge". My challenge center is just 7 or 8 worksheets that I've copied (they're usually from The Mailbox magazines and review concepts we're working on). I keep them in file folders in one of the desktop organizers. Then, when they finish, they turn them in to a challenge bin and I check them over. If I can tell they worked carefully and finished the whole thing, I pass it back with a sticker. They love the stickers and it's easy to maintain! I thought they would get tired of doing them, but all year I was looking for new workbooks to copy out of!
     

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