work stations menu

Discussion in 'First Grade' started by Lynnnn725, Aug 11, 2011.

  1. Lynnnn725

    Lynnnn725 Connoisseur

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    Aug 11, 2011

    I know many of you do Daily 5... this post is not for you :p

    For those who do work stations, do any of you allow your students to pick their work station? I've been letting my students choose their math stations for 5 years now and I'm ready to let them start choosing their literacy stations.
    My question is... how do you do it? Do you have a menu and they pick or do they put a clip next to a certain icon somewhere in the room or on a chart or something. Just wondering how to organize them choosing their stations and getting around to all of them.

    So far, I've thought of creating a menu. It's more of a grid. Each box has a station. They write the date in the box and keep the paper in their work station folder. And maybe on the whiteboard there is a larger copy of the grid and the kids put their magnetic name in the box of the station they are going to that day. IDK. Never have done this before. I'm sure I'm thinking too much...
     
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  3. lilmisses1014

    lilmisses1014 Comrade

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    Aug 12, 2011

    It depends on the group of students. Last year, I was able to let them choose their own stations, and they did so responsibly. Fortunately (I think...) I am required to have quite a few stations (computers, writing, listening, library, word work/phonics, retelling), so it's easy to spread the students out.

    A couple of years ago, I assigned stations for the students. They each received a manila file folder with personalized schedule stapled inside. They put all of their work-- complete and incomplete-- in their folders, which I checked on Fridays. I will probably do the same for this year's class.

    I know a lot of teachers like to use pocket charts to assign stations. It's a great idea, but it didn't work too well for me. My students also wasted a lot of time hanging out at the pocket chart stand, staring at it.
     
  4. Tasha

    Tasha Phenom

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    Aug 12, 2011

    I have mine arranged by colors and then there are choices within the colors. So the students on red might have a choice of computers, art station, or the red shelf (which has 3 small activities on it). Basically each color has a shelf and 2 larger activities, the kids can choose any of the things within their color for that day.
     
  5. KinderCowgirl

    KinderCowgirl Phenom

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    Aug 12, 2011

    I did that one year and it worked out really well. They carried their grid with them from station to station and colored it in (this was in Kinder) when they finished. There were 2 choices for each objective for example it said fluency and they could time a partner reading or read sentence strip sentences-they had to complete one for each skill.

    The past couple of years I haven't even had to implement a management system for them for workstations-they work in pairs and move on when they finish the activity to whatever is open. I like giving them more choice in how they are learning.
     
  6. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    Aug 16, 2011

    What I can't understand (I'm sometimes dense) is how you keep the kids from squabbling over stations. I can just picture lots of disruptions while I am trying to do guided reading groups, because "I wanna do the computer!" or "It's my turn for ...." How do you prevent this? (Yes, I do lots of modeling and practice, but they ARE first graders, and mine come from VERY unstructured backgrounds, many with little or no social skills.)
     
  7. Lynnnn725

    Lynnnn725 Connoisseur

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    Aug 16, 2011

    What if part of their morning job was to select their station for the day? Have an enlarged "menu" or "grid" somewhere in the room where they put their name.
     
  8. Tasha

    Tasha Phenom

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    Aug 16, 2011

    I have 6 colors so that means my groups have 3-4 students and most things in my room can be used by 3 students. Every year I still have a or 2 things that are the favorite thing of the year (and never the same!) and then I just have them switch out half way through station time while I am switching reading groups. Any squabbling during my stations earns you super boring seatwork (packets of all those old school worksheets).
     
  9. EMonkey

    EMonkey Connoisseur

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    Aug 17, 2011

    I have a sentence strip holder that I put the choices on. The children then put their name tag in the spot they are going to work in. They move it when they are changing workshop activities.

    I usually have limited choices such as solo reading, partner reading, LA games, writing, and listening center. The children get to pick what they are doing during the time. They must do the thing until the time change is announced. Once the time change is announced they get to pick again. If they specifically ask to stay I may agree depending on their reason. I limited it more this last year by insisting they do all the parts before going back to any one they have already done.

    I am thinking of doing something like a color in the area grid for each day or week so I can track the kids with more ease.

    I have not had many issues about arguing. The worst that has happened is partner reading where more kids want to join a pair who are already reading and the others do not want them to join.
     

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