Work Center/Vocational Activities

Discussion in 'Special Education Archives' started by Unregistered, Jan 7, 2004.

  1. Unregistered

    Unregistered Guest

    Jan 7, 2004

    Hi

    My Classroom has a corner of the room devoted to vocational skills. I have a class of nine autistic students, and would like to utilize this center more (for indepentent work). Currently, the center consists of buckets: 1. sorting coupons by category, 2. sorting utensils, 3.stuffing envelopes, 4.sorting change, and 5.job applications.

    I would like to change the activities every week. Can you please give me some ideas for more activites??? The kids age from 12-15. Some function on the level of a 3year old, while others are on a 5th grade level.

    Thank you.
     
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  3. clarnet73

    clarnet73 Moderator

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    Jan 7, 2004

    some of our work station baskets include...

    *setting the table (we use placemats that have outlines)
    *toothbrush holders (match top with same-colored bottom, insert pencil in the middle)
    *sorting laundry (actually this is in our laundry area, but would be functional, even if you used dishcloths)
    *sharpening pencils
    *sorting colored popsicle sticks into appropriate colored basket

    I'll think of more... our class is younger kids (5-11), but I'll ask around our older class and see if they have more "sophisticated" ideas. :)
     
  4. mommaruthie

    mommaruthie Aficionado

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    Jan 8, 2004

    sounds so great

    Its what we call in a montessori classroom- Practical Life

    I usually have things that may be obsolete these days but its maria montessori's suggestions for the younger kids...
    shoe polishing, and metal polishing,

    more useful are the: dressing boards, braiding, dish washing, food preparation skills, you can have a money/shopping activity where the basket of items have price tags on it and the kids use calculators and cashregister to exchange money and make change... Newspaper activities- teaching the parts of the newspaper and they have to explore for the answers to a questionaire that you have created. It would suggest, go to section A and locate page three.... Ask a question about each section..

    Hey, no time now to think but i promise i will think of ideas as i drive in to work today... Ruth
     
  5. ellen_a

    ellen_a Groupie

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    Jan 8, 2004

    Here are some skills my ADULTS need to know/develop in their vocational internships. You could begin developing them now...

    1. Silverwear rolling (i.e. in a napkin, roll one fork, one spoon, one knife). Restaurants require this of their prep workers.

    2. Weighing something out on a scale (i.e. 3 oz of dried pasta in a plastic bag). Food prep staff need to know how to weigh out food portions.

    3. Could you find a sticker gun, maybe from a supermarket? [I've never looked for one of these] Putting the price sticker onto an item is a repetitive goal for some of my adults.

    4. Preparing mass mailings is another goal for some--stick the labels on the mailings, seal the envelopes, sort by city, sort by zip code, etc. We actually do this for different advocacy/parent groups in our area--they bring the supplies to our site to work on.

    5. Punching a time card/clock can still be a realistic goal in some work settings; we used to have an old time clock that we had our adults "punch into" day program with. Some work sites would use swipe cards now, so that is another goal.

    6. Mail delivery is functional--either sorting into appropriate mailboxes (i.e. in your classroom/school) or collecting from mailboxes and delivering. We do this on our college campus and my adults love it. It helps with functional reading, mobility, number recognition (the boxes are numbered) and vocational. You could keep this a within-your-room center by tri-folding letters home, etc. and addressing to each student. Then have someone deliver to the appropriate mailboxes (which are pretty easy to make).


    I'm sure I'll think of more ideas after a long vocational Thursday at work! I'll add anything else I come up with. Hope these helped in some way.

    Ellen A.
     
  6. John

    John New Member

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    Sep 15, 2006

    I do need some ideas to start vocational activities with my children, kindly let me know if anyone has. john.
     
  7. clarnet73

    clarnet73 Moderator

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    Sep 17, 2006

    John,

    What age and functioning level are the kids that you're working with?
     
  8. John

    John New Member

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    Sep 21, 2006

    Thanks for your reply clarnet73. I am working with children at the age group of 14- 17 most of them are high functioning and the problems is i am working with arab children , so i need to consider their culture, becasue the activities that are suitable for europian children may not be suitable for these children, kindly advise what to do. thanks in advance.

    john.
    kuwait.
     
  9. clarnet73

    clarnet73 Moderator

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    Sep 21, 2006

    I'm not so good on the older kids, I work with little guys.

    Off the top of my head, though, I've seen HS-age programs doing things like cleaning the kitchen, emptying the wastebaskets, packaging by a specific criteria (you'd list what should go in the various bags and give them all the pieces), and working a lot with money... ordring from a menu, making change, giving correct change... does that give you a starting point? I'm sure Ellen or someone will come up with better suggestions for your older kids. ;)
     
  10. ellen_a

    ellen_a Groupie

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    Sep 21, 2006

    Hi John,

    I'm really not very familiar with the sort of cultural issues you might be experiencing--can you give examples of what sorts of activities would be culturally inappropriate or would need to be avoided?

    One way to structure your activities is to look at your students' current strengths and look at their long term goals--do you have any students who have identified where they would like to work/attend school/attend program/etc. when they leave your school? If you know these sorts of things, then you can begin to look at the prerequisite skills required, and structure simulated activities in your classroom to begin acquisition of those skills.

    So, for example, I had one student who wanted to eventually work in food service, and the family agreed that this would be reasonable/realistic. So, I structured vocational activities using skills similar to those that would be required in the food service industry--portioning, packaging, sorting, rolling silverwear, dishwashing, etc. For another student who looked to be headed on a clerical track, thinking office work would be a good job, we did vocational activities for shredding paper, filing papers, mass mailings, sorting mail into mailboxes, preparing mail, faxing, photocopying, etc.

    Hope that helps a little.
     
  11. John

    John New Member

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    Sep 22, 2006

    Dear ellen a,
    glad to see your reply. My problem is i am working with arab children where they are not used to do any household activities, means they have trained in that way that all those activities should be done only by servants or maids, also most of the parents doesn't like their children doing activities like working at supermarkets or making food preparation etc. but some of them do allow to do these activities. I am trying to make them understand what i am doing and for most of them vocational activities itself is a new concept. Here i am making my children to do activities like, simple printing with stencils, making paper covers, tissue box, paper bags, lamination and photocopying etc. i am just thinking to do something different for my children , since they cannot work outside due to the extreme climate, i want some ideas to do activities like in sheltered workshops. kindly advice. Thanks a lot for your interest. john. kuwait.
     
  12. ellen_a

    ellen_a Groupie

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    Sep 22, 2006

    John,

    What are your students' long term plans with regard to post-school outcomes? Where do you (and their families) think they will be working/attending/etc? Where will they be living (at home, supported apartment, etc.)?

    Ellen A.
     
  13. John

    John New Member

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    Oct 4, 2006

    Hello is any one knows, why many autistic children breath through their mouth instead of their nose? how to correct this?. my second question is one my autistic childs stomach looks little hard, means when u tap on his stomach u can hear a sound and its bounces back. His mother says he refuses to eat any food. since he is new to our center i am observing the signs for oral defensiveness, is there any other reason for the hard stomach and eating problem. kindly advise me. Thanks all.

    John
     

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