Won't Be Considered Unless Substituting First?

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by fishkafoon, Jul 15, 2010.

  1. fishkafoon

    fishkafoon Rookie

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2010
    Messages:
    34
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 15, 2010

    This question has been stewing for awhile.

    A bit of background first ...
    For the past year and a couple of months, I've worked with a boss whose wife is an assistant principal. When he discovered I was a former special education teacher, the message was relayed. In time, she did see my resume. She replied with a note which basically stated that based upon my experience and qualifications, I was the type of teacher they would definitely hire. It was only natural to apply.

    I didn't receive a response from the district but never allowed that to discourage me. At one point, my boss did ask me if I ever applied to any of the available openings. I told him that I did and even applied to an opening at his wife's school. She never saw my official resume or application. With that particular district alone, I have applied to 42 openings in the past year. While attending a local job fair back in the spring, I talked to the school representative and was told to apply to their substitute list. It came up in casual conversation at work and my boss affirmed that the district was "odd like that". Regardless of how stellar the resume, training, and experience may be, they simply won't give a second glance. They will not consider hiring anyone unless they substitute.

    I couldn't understand why I wasn't told but that's neither here nor there - just felt the attempt was in vain.

    Has anyone else dealt with a similar issue in a school district to which you've applied (or intend to apply)?
     
  2.  
  3. AhoyHoy

    AhoyHoy Rookie

    Joined:
    May 16, 2010
    Messages:
    50
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 16, 2010

    Is it that they won't consider you unless you've subbed in their district, or they won't consider you if you're not subbing in general?

    When I was in my education program during college, a principal from a local district spoke to one of our classes. He said that many districts/principals are wary of hiring teachers who have "gotten away from the profession," so to speak. They like to see that you're doing SOMETHING in education while you search for a job, because it makes you seem more dedicated, I guess. He did acknowledge that they understand that some people have extenuating circumstances, but made it sound like they still preferred those who subbed. So maybe it's something like that? Or maybe they just like to see you "in action" so that they know what you can offer through firsthand experience.
     
  4. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2005
    Messages:
    13,854
    Likes Received:
    1,695

    Jul 16, 2010

    In my school board, the path to a permanent position is: day-to-day subbing, long-term subbing, then a contract position.
     
  5. SCTeachInTX

    SCTeachInTX Fanatic

    Joined:
    May 27, 2009
    Messages:
    2,972
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 16, 2010

    When I first started teaching, I subbed to get in. And I was hired, but in a different district. Every other job I have had since then has been a teaching position. Substituting in their district is not a prerequisite. However, I do know that if you have been working out of the educational field for awhile, there is the thought that you are not current on educational trends. I would take some classes to stay current if you cannot quit your current position. I would try to find some way to work in some volunteer hours so that you can show that you have worked with kids recently as well.
     
  6. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2001
    Messages:
    24,950
    Likes Received:
    2,102

    Jul 16, 2010

    fishka:
    Are you not teaching now? (what job do you have? The longer you are 'out' of teaching the harder it will be to get 'in') Your descriptor says you are trying to get your foot in the door- subbing is a good way to do this.
     
  7. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

    Joined:
    May 8, 2008
    Messages:
    8,325
    Likes Received:
    1,441

    Jul 16, 2010

    Funny. I subbed in six school districts and only one of them would even give me an interview. One flat out said they do not hire from their sub pool but would be thrilled to be a reference for me. It depends on the school's philosophy, I suppose.
     
  8. AhoyHoy

    AhoyHoy Rookie

    Joined:
    May 16, 2010
    Messages:
    50
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 16, 2010

    That's so ridiculous. Did they explain their reasoning behind it?
     
  9. allisonbeth

    allisonbeth Comrade

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2005
    Messages:
    251
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 16, 2010

    Wow! I wonder how they manage to get/ keep subs with that attitude.
     
  10. fishkafoon

    fishkafoon Rookie

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2010
    Messages:
    34
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 16, 2010

    The district would not consider unless I had substituted for them, AhoyHoy. I wholeheartedly agree with the need to filter out those of a questionable nature, and, see the interaction of the substitute, students, staff, administration, and staff. I suppose it was the manner in which it was construed that they were being rigid (for lack of a better word) in terms of giving someone an opportunity.

    As MrsC mentioned, I can understand the progression from substituting to teaching. It sounds as if the policies may be similar, if not the same. I wasn't initially told that tidbit of information from the assistant principal, so it was misleading.

    Typing this with a rueful grin...
    I have been out awhile. It's been 4 years to be exact, SCTeachInTX. I have an M.S.E. in Special Education (P - 12) and a B.S.E. in Elementary Ed. K-8/Special Ed. K-12 but nothing current since 2005. Despite staying abreast of the current trends through means of research (ex: the WASL is no longer - it's now HSPE and MSP), it's clearly not enough to hold water with administration. I think you're right. I really need to sit behind the desk before getting in front of the desk again.

    I'm not teaching, czacza. It took me a bit of time to get state certification because of saving up enough to take the Praxis II (took two exams, elem. cck and spec. ed. cck, back-to-back -- bleh!) and WEST-B, and, pay for fingerprinting and licensure fees. I finally received my state certification in elementary and special education last August and have been applying ever since. The job I've had for the past year and a couple of months is in the shipping and receiving industry. Yes, nothing about it is indicative of education whatsoever. :lol: The year before I began my practicum, I substituted. It's just been a long time since (back in '90 - '92).

    Would think that due to your experience in the six school districts that you'd be a shoe-in, catnfiddle. Has me curious about their reasoning behind it, too.
     
  11. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

    Joined:
    May 8, 2008
    Messages:
    8,325
    Likes Received:
    1,441

    Jul 16, 2010

    Most of the subs they keep from year to year are ones who are retired teachers or who only have their subbing license. Often they are parents who wanted to take their classroom volunteering to the next level. The school in question prefers to recruit their new teachers with experience in their own classrooms (meaning they tend to grab some of the best teachers from nearby schools). Since they're nationally ranked for their academics, they can do this.

    I'm far from bitter about this. They treated me like a member of the faculty while I worked there. They also made sure I was paid for a full day's work even if the subbing assignment was only a half-day (they plugged me into tutoring English because they knew it was my strength). However, the subbing coordinator was very clear that this was the way things worked and she knew she would face major turnover each year.
     
  12. smurfette

    smurfette Habitué

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2008
    Messages:
    895
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 16, 2010

    I don't see how districts can expect teachers, especially ones from other districts who have become used to a teacher's salary, to sub for a year or years while they wait for a teaching job. How can people afford that, if they don't have a significant other to share the bills? Maybe subs in other regions get paid more, but with the cost of living here, that barely covers rent and food. Forget having electricity or water.

    I guess it irks me because I feel like the districts are trying to take advantage of certified teachers.
     
  13. MissJill

    MissJill Cohort

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2009
    Messages:
    733
    Likes Received:
    1

    Jul 16, 2010


    Absolutely!
    The local district that I went to did the same exact thing. I followed along and was a sub for the district for 2 1/2 years. What a waste of time! I finally asked is there anyway to get paid just a little bit more (I was making $70/day) and they said they do not need to pay subs more because there will always be another sub looking to get into the district. When I asked what I needed to do to get a position in the district I was told some subs worked for 6-7 years before they got in! Yet I saw people who never worked a day for the district in their life get a job in a day because their family or whoever knew someone...and some definitely weren't qualified.

    So glad the superintendent is being investigated by the FBI now.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

Total: 293 (members: 0, guests: 273, robots: 20)
test