Will online become the new normal?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by DamienJasper, Apr 8, 2020.

  1. DamienJasper

    DamienJasper Rookie

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    How likely do any of you think that is? Maybe I’m looking too far ahead to when the dust settles. But I have a hard time believing that given that students the world over have been moved to online only that it won’t be considered.

    What do you think?
     
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  3. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    No. I don't think it will. There are currently online schools, so we might see it online teaching/learning improved, or see teachers who look to utilize more blended styles, or even see more teachers and students interested in this kind of teaching/learning....but, I think many people feel like nothing replaces in-person teaching/learning. Parents, students, and teachers are feeling frustrated by this (granted, a lot of that is due to lack or preparation, technology, resources, etc.), and I really don't think we will see this become the new norm. I think people are desperate to get back to our brick and mortar schools.

     
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  4. 3Sons

    3Sons Enthusiast

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    I doubt it will become "the new normal" -- though it may become more prevalent than it had been previously. That happened with a lot of firms in the NY area after the dust settled from Hurricane Sandy, which forced a lot of firms to work remotely for their entire downtown offices for months. After realizing how much that saved in real estate fees, electrical fees, etc., and without seeing a huge drop in productivity, they became a lot more enthused about that idea.

    Of course, there are reasons that won't happen with education -- managing kids isn't the same as managing adults, and some educational activities (art, gym, etc.) pretty strongly favor actual presence. And real estate fees probably aren't as big a concern for schools that aren't paying rent in the standard sense anyway. I could see it eliminating snow days, though, or at least eliminate eating into snow days enough to affect summer/spring vacations.
     
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  5. Sarge

    Sarge Enthusiast

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    No. I think there will be a lot more schools incorporating online activities into their brick and mortar instruction and there could be a rise in "hybrid" schools where students might attend for a shorter day or a shorter week with more out of class instruction taking place.

    What I do think is that this will be a shot in the arm for 1:1 devices in every school. The "new normal" might be for every student to have their own school-issued Chromebook.

    Most of my 7th graders want nothing more right now than to be at school and to be physically present in a classroom. I think their parents want that too.

    I also think that distance learning might become the norm for certain students who cannot, for various reasons, attend traditional schools. I could envision larger districts having a "distance learning department" where students will be able to access a comprehensive program online.
     
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  6. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    Our district already has an online public school that is K-12. I see it being much more popular next school year.
     
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  7. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    Our state has a huge virtual school. High school students are required to take a virtual class as part of their graduation requirements. I don't know if they could keep up with more students if more virtual courses were required.
     
  8. Sarge

    Sarge Enthusiast

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    One thing for sure, online or not. They are still going to need teachers.
     
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  9. Sarge

    Sarge Enthusiast

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    And in all honesty, if they went to some sort of hybrid model and it meant that my hour train commute was 3 days a week instead of 5 because two days a week I taught online, I'd be cool with that.
     
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  10. Tired Teacher

    Tired Teacher Devotee

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    I don't think so from what I see here. Many parents are pulling their hair out trying to get their kids to work at home right now.
    I have gotten more thank you messages from parents the last 2 weeks than I get in a year. We are really doing online learning here to the max.
    1 parent told me she never realized how teachers are heroes like nurses. Another who happens to have the nicest, most cooperative kid you could ever meet told me, " I have no clue how you could do this w/19 others."
    I wanted to laugh, but had to stay professional. I wanted to tell her imagine this: Those other kids are not even 1/100 th as cooperative as yours!
    If only I had that 1 kid to teach, life would be so easy!
     
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  11. Anna music teacher

    Anna music teacher Rookie

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    I agree with you. Even in Italy we are using the distance teaching/learning that it can be very interesting and helpful but nothing can replace the human relationship between
    teachers and students.
     
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  12. Anna music teacher

    Anna music teacher Rookie

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    That's sure!
     
  13. whizkid

    whizkid Devotee

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    The New projections of 60,000 deaths by August with social distancing until then suggests it could be until August.
     
  14. 3Sons

    3Sons Enthusiast

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    It *is* becoming a lot easier to have a sip or two of wine with lunch now...:)
     
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  15. whizkid

    whizkid Devotee

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    Some think the NFL won't start until late November. If that ends up being the case, what does that say for everything else especially schools?
     
  16. DamienJasper

    DamienJasper Rookie

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    May 22, 2020 at 4:29 PM

    Sorry if this counts as “bumping” a thread.

    Rather than an “online only” model, I wonder (since most everyone here is more experienced than me) if anyone saw a recent poll that said something like 15% of people would want to stick with a homeschooling model “when this is all over.”

    As a mildly related side note; “when”? Is it not possible that a vaccine will never be found? Speaking about it like it’s a given seems slippery.
     
  17. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    May 22, 2020 at 4:39 PM

    To answer your "when" - two possibilities. Either we will have a vaccine, if not this year, then next, in all likelihood, OR, enough people will have the infection and create their own neutralizing antibodies, eventually meaning more people will become immune and there will be far fewer susceptible individuals to become ill. This is the long way of getting herd health immunity, but if we have a vaccine and the same 50% of the people who fail to get vaccinated for the flu fail to get vaccinated for COVID-19, you will still have some people getting sick/becoming immune, but it will eventually create the same herd immunity. I teach science - I don't understand not getting vaccinated, but I do understand how this virus works.
     
    Last edited: May 22, 2020 at 8:37 PM
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  18. DamienJasper

    DamienJasper Rookie

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    May 22, 2020 at 5:00 PM

    The vaccine thing though; they don’t even have a cure for the common cold.
     
  19. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    May 22, 2020 at 5:05 PM

    Probably because the common cold is a multitude of viruses. Current thinking is that you do become immune to each one of the viruses you are infected with, so one down, a couple of hundred or so to go. Remember to feel grateful for each cold - you just gained a new immunity.

    The fact that people contract COVID, get sick, and, for the most part, get better has been shown to be the neutralizing antibodies that we produce. The current vaccine candidates do, in at least some of the cases, also cause the vaccinated test subjects to produce those all important neutralizing antibodies. Many vaccines against viruses such as HIV produce antibodies, but not neutralizing antibodies, which means those vaccines aren't at all effective. People who recover have neutralizing antibodies to COVID virus. That is what they are shooting for, and the vaccines have shown great promise - maybe not this December promise, but on the right track. There is much to be hopeful and actually excited about, says the biology teacher!
     
    Last edited: May 22, 2020 at 5:11 PM
  20. DamienJasper

    DamienJasper Rookie

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    May 22, 2020 at 9:48 PM

    Thanks for your input on that. But like I said, that's sort of a side thought and something basically hugely out of my control.

    I'm more curious as to what the more experienced here think about the homeschooling thing.
     
  21. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    May 22, 2020 at 10:45 PM

    Maybe you will see more homeschooling where you are, but one of the reasons that the president has been so insistent on reopening the schools for a fall start is that he knows that schools not only educate a family's children, but also provide, in essence, safe day care. If businesses are going to go back to the status quo, then the parents have to be able to go off to work without worrying about having to pay for childcare. Schools are that answer for a vast majority of families with school age children. Some may "homeschool", but I suspect that when the teachers are not providing the lessons and material, they may find it harder than it appeared during this crisis. But even if some decide to go that route, your numbers are not enough to put schools out of business, IMHO. Trying it, and staying with it are two very different things. When the recession of 2008-2009 hit, and many people were without jobs, some parents (mothers) decided to homeschool. However, as the job market improved, and families were struggling to get out of the financial hole that so many were in, mothers returned to the job market to improve income for the family. Right now, many businesses are going to take major hits, reducing available jobs. Two income families may find themselves with only one income coming in. People want to feel like they are doing something meaningful, that they are helping. Until jobs with income become more readily available, educating the kids makes you feel needed and useful. However, when the job market picks up, an extra income will most likely trump providing education at home, especially for those families using free education. Look at the unemployment numbers - these are people who are hurting for money. Send the kids to school so you can go to work will make perfect sense when the job market improves.

    Just for the record, I've been teaching since 1988, so some experience.
     
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  22. DamienJasper

    DamienJasper Rookie

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    May 22, 2020 at 10:55 PM

    I'm very sorry; looking at my last post it does sound like I was implying that you don't have the experience I was asking for. I didn't mean to imply that at all. I mean more experience compared to me. I was four years old in 1988.
     
  23. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    May 22, 2020 at 11:46 PM

    And since I started in a preschool class, you could have been one of my students. ;)
     

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