Will I get a job quicker if I'm willing to teach all disabilities?

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by teacher girl, Aug 30, 2011.

  1. teacher girl

    teacher girl Comrade

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    Aug 30, 2011

    I am trying to obtain a provisional license ( wishful thinking) I passed all my exams and am currently in my masters program ( I can't wait to teach! I'm really excited)---In the school district that I want to work for, You can choose between ( LD, ED, SD, HI, MR/ID) I only chose SD and LD on my application and hadn't heard anything. ( stupid question) I was wandering if I would be more desirable if I was willing to teach everything? or should I choose everything? what do you think?
     
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  3. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    Aug 30, 2011

    I would only choose the areas that you have a passion to really teach. However, the more that you are certified and comfortable teaching, the more jobs that can be available.
     
  4. WaterfallLady

    WaterfallLady Enthusiast

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    Aug 30, 2011

    Abbreviations are different in all the states. What is SD?
     
  5. teacher girl

    teacher girl Comrade

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    SD in virginia is an abbreviation for severe disability ( kids in wheelchairs etc.)
     
  6. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    Aug 30, 2011

    Don't take a job you don't want. I found job searching that there is a huge need for people to work in emotional/behavior disturbed rooms. If I was willing to do that, I could have pretty much picked my location and district. I'm not even certified in moderate/severe needs, and I went to an interview that was listed as mild/mod. I get there and find out they'd filled that position and kept everyone on the interviews hoping they'd find someone interested in doing mod/severe EBD. They practically spent the entire interview begging me to take the job (convincing me my skills would be transferable) and offered it to me on the spot even though I flat out said I wasn't interested in that type of position. That was in an incredibly tough market in late June, and it was my first real interview even though I'd been applying for months. I'm SO glad I didn't fall for it though. I would have been miserable. For me, being with a mild/mod. population in an elementary school was non-negotiable. It was also a lot easier to find mild/mod. jobs in middle schools and high schools, and some of my parents friends who were teachers thought I was crazy to not apply for those jobs to at least get my foot in the door somewhere. However, I just knew I wasn't going to take a job I didn't want!
     
  7. roll

    roll Rookie

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    Aug 30, 2011

    This. You do need to be flexible somewhere - decide if you don't mind giving on your preferred disability category, age, location, type of school - or you'll have a difficult time getting a job. But I wouldn't take a job I didn't think I could learn to do well and enjoy.

    Average burnout for special ed teachers is 3 years. I'm not going to push myself and become a statistic - I've worked too hard for this and it's what I want to do.
     

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