Why kids can't sit still

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by DrivingPigeon, Oct 11, 2014.

  1. DrivingPigeon

    DrivingPigeon Phenom

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    Oct 11, 2014

    I apologize if this was already posted, but I found it very interesting, and had to share:

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs...-so-many-kids-cant-sit-still-in-school-today/

    The article is about how kids are sitting upright too often (versus rolling, climbing, spinning, etc.), which leads to poor core strength. Since reading it a few weeks ago, and watching my students closely, I can really see a lot of truth in this! My "athletic" students, who are involved in more sports, dance, etc. are much more attentive and have better control of their bodies than students who are constantly talking about Minecraft, XBoxes, and iPads.
     
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  3. HorseLover

    HorseLover Comrade

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    Oct 11, 2014

    This makes so much sense. Kids (and adults) are not nearly active enough as they should be (and I include myself in that).
     
  4. mrachelle87

    mrachelle87 Fanatic

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    Oct 11, 2014

    I agree...I read an article a few years back that discussed how children that learn to go across the monkey bars are better readers. Both activities use the same brain functions. I watch and there ia little truth to it, but after I read this article I decided that all three are connected.
     
  5. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    Oct 12, 2014


    Good point. Children definitely need to move. Studies say that all people at any age, should move around at least once an hour. I am sure it is more for elementary students. I have found that activities in the classroom can be done to get students to move more.

    I wouldn't knock video games and IPADs too hard. True, they are not as good as regular movement. It beats a lot of classrooms I have seen for movement. They are moving their hands a lot and that alone keeps them engaged more than many classrooms I have seen.
     
  6. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    Oct 12, 2014

    Also, children move around much less than 25 years ago. When I was in school we had morning, lunch, and afternoon recess. Lunch recess was 30 minutes. Also, we were constantly at the chalk board doing work, and got out much more for Science which we had 5 days a week. Even if we can't bring back as much recess, I do think we can get students another way to move around in the classroom.
     
  7. DrivingPigeon

    DrivingPigeon Phenom

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    Oct 12, 2014

    The author of the article actually did a follow-up article where she stated that things like movement breaks throughout the day help, but it's not enough. Her suggestion is that kids have a 60-minute recess every day.
     
  8. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Oct 12, 2014

    Which would result in a half hour added to your day as no district is going to take away instructional time for more recess. Which would involve renegotiating contracts...more time=more money.
     
  9. mathmagic

    mathmagic Enthusiast

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    Oct 12, 2014

    This definitely is a great reminder for me to be pushing kids to do a bit less reading and to instead run around and play during the recesses. I have several students who absolutely love to read almost non-stop, and are unsurprisingly very, very high readers. And, they do have 60 minutes of recess a day (two 15's and a 30, as well as a 30 minute lunch). I may try to start telling them that at least a couple of the recesses need to be movement breaks, and that the final recess, which I've already considered opening the classroom for (so as to allow students to use the laptops to do homework they might not be able to do as easily at home), they are welcome to make any choice.

    That, and I always make sure that if we're doing a long whole-group piece or some kind of work that even if it is split up into many different activities, they are at their desk the entire time, that we take a stretch break and do some funny/random movements just to shake out all the dust :)
     
  10. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    Oct 12, 2014

    Personally, if a child is reading at recess, I would not interfere. A student that is so into a book that he/she wants to read at recess, that brings a smile to my face and heart. I don't interfere, unless something is wrong...and reading at a time of choice to me isn't wrong. I think to every rule there is an exception. Some students can get away with a bit less movement and I think we should let them be. I think what is key is that students have the opportunity for movement. Those active boys who really need it, then will take time for movement if given the chance.
     
  11. iteachbx

    iteachbx Enthusiast

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    Oct 12, 2014

    That's why I'm a big proponent of active sitting. I have 6 Hokki stools in my classroom and I love them- of my students do too. I'm trying to get more. Also, my students are constantly moving from rug to seats back to rug for different parts of a lesson.
     
  12. minnie

    minnie Cohort

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    Oct 13, 2014

    As a parent, I know how important it is for kids to go outside to play. However, it is so much different now than when I was a kid. Parents are too scared to let their kids just go play outside unless they are outside watching them. Violence in our country is lower than its been in decades (based on an article in "Parents" magazine) but with Facebook, the internet and all of the news channels, we hear every horrible thing. No more "Be back by dinner time." Also, the lure of video games and ipads is stronger than ever. Everyone talks about them at school. That makes other kids want to be a part of that and play video games too.

    I have a very active son and I see a huge difference in him when I take him out to just run and climb on things. Afterwards, he is ready for bed and seems happier. I wish I could do it more.
     
  13. DrivingPigeon

    DrivingPigeon Phenom

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    Oct 13, 2014

    Very good points! It's so interesting (and sad) how things change over the years.
     
  14. ktdclark

    ktdclark Comrade

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    Oct 13, 2014

    I am an avid crossfitter and have learned so much about mobility and core strength in the past few years which I bring into the classroom every day. I am also someone who needs to move in order to focus...
    Teaching kids how to engage their cores and sitting properly for a moment helps with concentration and focus on their bodies. We work on mobility and core and strength exercises every day before we read, do math, work in groups, whatever....focus improves so much!
     

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