Why is homework bad?

Discussion in 'Debate & Marathon Threads Archive' started by Jerseygirlteach, Aug 28, 2014.

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  1. Jerseygirlteach

    Jerseygirlteach Groupie

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    It seems that the consensus on this board is that homework is bad. Why? Homework, to me, is a chance to reinforce concepts learned at school, promote retention, and a way to involve parents in the learning process. How is that bad?

    Here is the homework I give each night:

    Reading log- read or be read to anything for 20 minutes and record it in a log

    Math - short activity based on class work that day

    Spelling - students select an activity choice from a menu to help learn words/spelling pattern of the week.

    If this is "busy work", how so?

    Homework, in total, shouldn't take my students more than an hour, max. That leaves them several hours free to do other activities or chores. I accept notes from parents if homework must be missed due to special circumstances like appointments or special plans.

    If your argument against homework is that kids need to relax, why? They don't relax so much in high performing countries and a moderate amount of homework still allows for relax time. Plus, while I'd like to believe that extra relax time would mean for more outdoor play, most of my students report to me that the bulk of their free time is spent in front of a tv or computer screen. Personally, I think academics is a better use of their time.

    So why is homework bad? I can assure you that I not looking to debate. I genuinely don't understand that argument against it and I'm hoping to be enlightened.
     
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  3. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    I don't think hw is bad at all...among other things, it provides reinforcement of concepts that have been well taught, it assesses learning so that students can self monitor and teachers can be guided in instruction, it fosters independence, it builds a home to school link. :2cents: I do think, however, there should be guidelines at every grade level for the amount of hw assigned.
     
  4. jojo808

    jojo808 Comrade

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    I don't think HW is bad at all. I just don't like the word :) We can't grade homework (at my school). The HW I give is usually revising, working on a project, research, completing work not finished in class--work I need to grade. Plus for some reason, the 10 yr olds I teach get stuck on the part "home". we have study hall three times a week, plus extended homeroom time, yet kids think they need to wait until they get home to do the work.
     
  5. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    It's not bad. It reinforces concepts, teaches students to manage their time outside of school, and encourages good work ethic and owning of learning.
     
  6. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    Personally, and I do mean personally, I find an hour of homework at the 3/4 grade level to be excessive and almost double what the districts around me would be recommending. Just my opinion. :2cents:
     
  7. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

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    I used to call it "homefun". I probably picked that up from someone here :lol:
     
  8. Pashtun

    Pashtun Fanatic

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    1. Can you get all your students to do it?
    2. How do you provide feedback?
    3. How are you making sure that homework is at the appropriate(independent) level for each student?

    If you can do all three, then I think homework is effective.
     
  9. gr3teacher

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    1) Research shows that homework doesn't end up doing any good at the elementary level
    2) Kids aren't meant to be in constant work mode
    3) Finland is as successful a school system as there is out there. They give no homework at lower levels, and negligible amounts at upper levels.

    From the way I see it, it's the law of diminishing returns. It's exhausting enough for young children to get through the school day. Giving them even more to do after that just isn't fair.

    I typically ask my students to read for 20 minutes a night, anything of their choice, and about 5 minutes or so of other work, because it's easier to assign homework than to explain to parents why I'm not, but I'd prefer to give students no homework other than reading 20 minutes a day.

    Another reason to avoid homework cropped up for me last year. I found out that about five of my students are on a bus for an hour to get to school. So for those kids, they're at school for seven hours, on the bus for two (9), another hour eating breakfast and dinner (10), sleeping for ten hours (20), and figure about another hour or so getting ready for bed/ready for school (21). So that leaves them about three hours of "kid time." I don't think it would be right of me to take any more of that time than is absolutely necessary.
     
  10. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    I call it that. :)

    I'm not an elementary teacher, but I can't imagine a little 8-year-old kid having an hour of homework at night. :(
     
  11. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    And for what it's worth, my district policy is ten minutes per year... so nothing for kinders, ten minutes for first, twenty for second, etc.
     
  12. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

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    My kids get on the bus at 7:00 am, are in school from 8:00-3:45, and get home at 5:30. They are in school "mode" longer than I am for my full time, salaried job's typical hours (7:30-5:00). By the time I get home after 6:00 (because who leaves right at 5?), we eat dinner, and I figure in time for baths/showers/speaking to each other (not including homefun), we have approximately 1 hour for "kid" time. So I TOTALLY agree with you on this. I am a former teacher, and I get so frustrated over the levels of homeWORK we have to do. Especially when my daughter tells me that they had time to play Jeopardy for 20 minutes in class. :sorry:

    It's brutal. BRUTAL.
     
  13. mollydoll

    mollydoll Connoisseur

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    I give homework only when necessary. This is very rare and is usually finishing lab questions/reflection or similar. Generally, any kid that uses class time wisely will finish all work. I stress this and help kids get organized and focus in class.

    I consider it my job to structure my lessons and class time to provide the needed instruction and reinforcement so kids can work on AP classes, do sports, play instruments, have part time jobs, hang out with family and friends, or watch tv. I don't have a claim on their after school time, assuming they do their part during the school day (which is long enough already).

    I had so much homework in elementary school that I stopped doing it because I wanted to do fun things (or read) that didn't include hours of busy work. Some nights I had 3-4 hrs of work because I was in gifted programs that gave us homework, plus we made up all classwork and homework missed during our pull outs, even if it was tedious copying of vocabulary words we already knew or extra math problems that we already knew how to do.

    In addition to the above, students don't have equal home situations. Some kids go to a homeless shelter. Some kids work to help feed their family. Some kids have to take care of their siblings. I don't need to make their lives harder.
     
  14. HistoryVA

    HistoryVA Devotee

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    My homework is always a page of reading in their workbook and 5-6 questions from the reading. It takes 20 minutes max. Plus they need to review the notes from the day because they always have a 5 question quiz during the next class.

    My homework is not review, though. The students actually read and answer questions about what we're going to discuss NEXT class. I love it because my Direct Instruction is super-interactive. During notes, the students talk as much as I do. If we're discussing the beginning of World War II, for instance, we can discuss much more in-depth if they already have some idea of who Hitler it, what happened at Pearl Harbor, etc.

    I do stick to 20 min max for my regular students though (and I only see them every other day) because I know they have other classes. My low-level kids don't get any homework besides reviewing their notes.
     
  15. TeacherNY

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    My nephew was in K last year and got homework and projects to complete at home. I think the homework was optional but the projects had to be done (they were given at least 4 weeks to do it) so I don't think it was too bad.
     
  16. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    I don't think homework is bad; however, there are lots of factors that teachers need to consider when giving out homework. My daughter is in 5th grade and has had 'homework' every night this week. It doesn't take very long because it comes down to anything they didn't finish in class, and she consistently finishes everything but one or two questions. We also study spelling words every night that only takes about 5 minutes.

    I'm lucky in that even though I'm a single parent, I don't have super long hours at my job so I'm home in plenty of time to help her if she needs it. My daughter is not doing any sports this semester which helps. And she's an only child so I only have one child's work to worry about and concentrate on. Other students are not as lucky though.
     
  17. Jerseygirlteach

    Jerseygirlteach Groupie

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    No, I can't get every student to do it. Why is it only effective if I can get every student to do it? I can't get each and every student to do a lot of things that I think are effective for those students that do them.

    I said an hour max. I estimate that the spelling takes 10 minutes and the math another 10. When we have indoor recess, I let them do it at recess and that's how long it usually takes them. So, really we're talking 40 minutes as the norm with 1/2 of that going towards independent reading of a book of their choice - something I would think would be enjoyable and something that every teacher would recommend. Am I wrong?

    I don't know about research studies, but I find that most of my students are able to master their spelling words each work and I would assume the spelling homework has a lot to do with that. Why wouldn't it?

    What should children be doing with their time rather than an hour or so of reading a self-selected book and some spelling and math practice? And if they are, in fact, watching TV, wouldn't you prefer they be doing the reading/spelling/math?

    Personally, as a parent, I get frustrated when teachers don't give homework because I don't think my own kids are motivated enough to practice without direction from their teachers, so I want them to have that direction.

    Again, I'm not debating. I'm just trying to understand the anti-homework argument.
     
  18. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

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    I assign reading for homework. I try to give them at least two days before it's due. Sometimes we start it in class and sometimes we don't.

    My students do many activities. A lot tell me they don't get home until 6 or 7 at the earliest. Then they have dinner and it's straight into homework. Even if each class only gives 20 minutes of homework, that's still two hours worth of work. Reading definitely takes longer than 20 minutes!

    Each student in my school has at least one 30 minute study hall. Some have an additional 30 or 40 minute one too, but not a lot.

    I don't come home and do a ton of work; I don't want to force them to either.
     
  19. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    I will only say that many students where I live are involved in sports, gymnastices, dance, cheerleading, and the list goes on. Furthermore, if they aren't, there is a chance siblings are. Since your age group most likely won't be left home alone at that age, they are in the car and along for the ride. The time adds up. Many kids don't enjoy reading, but that doesn't mean I don't think they should read. I am a fan of DEAR time at school, since it is a better opportunity for teachers to see what is going on with the individual students. I didn't say no to homework, but doing something that generates inquiry and reflection seems to be more helpful overall. Those vocabulary words and the inevitable sentences may be better taught through the use of a creative writing assignment that goes beyond the trite word in a sentence without context. I also would be encouraging them to use the keyboard for HW if there is tech in the home. It is never too soon to learn that valuable skill, is less tedious to correct if a mistake is made, and is just more stimulating overall, making HW less trying. These are the digital natives, but they can use help gaining proficiency.
     
  20. Pashtun

    Pashtun Fanatic

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    My personal stance is that I am able to get FAR FAR FAR more students to work hard in class where I have set the expectations. I have no idea what the expectations are at home.

    I have gotten homework turned in completed by parents, I know for a fact parents are telling kids answers to some of the work in the past.

    If I am not able to get a large percent of the studnets to do the homework, then to me it loses a lot of value, as a classroom process. Like I said, you also have to be able to provide good feedback, which to me means some classtime, and it must also be independent(differentiated) for the students. Again, lots of teacher effort and time that I personally think could be better used in the classroom, where I have more control over who does and does not do the work.

    I also give spelling patterns for homework this year. I can tell you right now, if I cannot get everyone with the exception of 1-2 students to do the homework, I will end it. I find spelling pattern analysis valuable and if needed I will just do it in class where I am able to set the expectations...etc.

    Also, as grade3 said, research does not support homework in elementary classes 4th grade and below.
     
  21. Pashtun

    Pashtun Fanatic

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    Spending time with their parents. Playing board games together, maybe catch, being kids, color, draw, fight with siblings...etc.

    In my opinion, kids are almost in school as much as a fulltime employee(my school is 6 1/2 hours). That is enough time.
     
  22. teacherbatman

    teacherbatman Companion

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    Do you really want to know why?
    Read this book for a fresh perspective:

    [​IMG]
     
  23. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    I assign very little homework on a daily basis. It primarily consists of unfinished work and reading. My attitude towards homework has evolved over time; I used to assign much more homework than I do now.
     
  24. bandnerdtx

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    :thumb:
     
  25. Go Blue!

    Go Blue! Connoisseur

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    I don't care if other teachers give homework - I just do not want to.

    Our students simply don't do daily homework. Our Admin has had numerous meetings about this with our staff and they suggest that we don't assign much homework since our kids are not completing it. It only hurts their grades and does not motivate them to complete it. Or, Admin suggests that we give students time in class to complete homework.

    Admin has made HW only worth 10% of a student's grade at my school, so it's not worth it for the student to do it.
     
  26. ms.irene

    ms.irene Connoisseur

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    I have been thinking about this very issue ever since I overhead another teacher talking about not giving homework anymore. I am currently weighing the pros and cons.

    In my English class, students will always have reading to do, and although we usually start it in class, they will need to finish it. I figure about 30 pages with two days to complete should be do-able at their level. When they're not reading, they will be working on projects or writing assignments. So in this class, HW makes sense.

    My French classes are trickier. I used to assign one workbook activity per night to review what we did in class that day. I found that most days, only half would have done the work, and of those students, half would have done it right. The 1/4 of my class who did the HW right would be the same ones who study well independently, do well on assessments, and generally get good grades regardless of what I do.

    This means that the students who need the most support would be penalized for not having the hw, hurting their grades even more. Even worse, in my opinion, are the ones who had been practicing wrong at home. As Fred Jones says, "perfect practice makes perfect." Almost none of my students have someone at home to help them with French, so they are flailing on their own and perhaps getting frustrated or even ingraining the wrong things.

    On top of all that is the fact that checking, correcting, grading, and passing back all those papers ends up taking up so much valuable time, in-class and after. It even has me keeping my room set up to check hw as fast as possible. I am getting the feeling that hw is taking over my classroom, and is not providing the results I need it to. I think I am going to be better off using every second of class time for instruction.

    All that being said, though, I also feel as though parents, students, and other teachers all think you are lowering your expectations by not giving hw, and I can understand that feeling, too. So I am stuck and not really sure what I want to do.

    One solution is to require students to make flashcards (or a quizlet) for each unit to study for 15 minutes per night, with the expectation that there could be a pop quiz any day (or maybe even that there will be one!). That way students are getting practice and structure without the pitfalls of traditional hw.

    Any thoughts or suggestions on this approach?
     
  27. agdamity

    agdamity Fanatic

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    Many of my students are busy playing the parent role to their younger siblings because their parents work second shift. Some do not have electricity because their parents can't afford the light bill. Many do not have parents who could help if they had questions. Some are living in a homeless shelter or a car. They are 10 and dealing with more life situations than I can ever imagine. Homework is the least of their concerns.
     
  28. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    Kids have a very limited amount of time to be kids, as I illustrated. I'd prefer they have a chance to do so. If that means they watch tv, then they watch tv. I'd rather they go outside to run and play, but I think they should have at least as much downtime as adults have.

    Your kids do well on their spelling tests. Do you think they'd do as well if you gave them the same test this time next year? And if so, do you think they'd do as well because they had homework on it, or because they had practiced using them in meaningful ways during writing and literacy activities in your classroom?
     
  29. 100%Canadian

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    [I don't know about research studies, but I find that most of my students are able to master their spelling words each work and I would assume the spelling homework has a lot to do with that. Why wouldn't it?]

    This might enlighten you but take it for what it's worth.
    http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/ne...032684827?nk=2dd966219dd381f3d43a5fa66e2e6857

    An earlier post mentioned Finland's education system - I'm a big fan of theirs and clearly they're doing something right. Here's an American teacher's blog; he teaches in Finland now and has provided a lot of insight into how different learning is in Finland compared to North America.
    http://www.taughtbyfinland.com/
     
  30. amakaye

    amakaye Enthusiast

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    I have also greatly decreased the amount of homework I assign over the last few years. A lot of it is unfinished work, but even some of that I do not send home (because I have too many kids who don't work in class because they know Mom will help them with it/do it for them...but boy they suddenly can do it during Friday Free Time!). I also usually assign a math worksheet on what we have been practicing, and 20 minutes of independent reading (although I don't use any sort of log).

    I did totally get rid of spelling homework a few years ago, without seeing any difference in my students' performance on their spelling tests. I give a list of suggested activities to use for practice at home, and we do word sorts and other practice in class.
     
  31. 2ndTimeAround

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    I teach high school students. I totally believe that homework is necessary for some secondary courses.

    There simply is not enough time in the semester to cover the entire curriculum without sending some stuff home for students to do. In some classes this can be minimal - maybe 20-30 minutes per week or even non-existant. In some classes, especially math-based ones, nightly homework would be ideal.
     
  32. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    Adding...

    For the most part I believe homework is beneficial to the student in my courses. I seldom grade homework. Students realize this after a while and either copy a friend's or just don't do anything. And almost every such student sees a sharp decrease in their test scores.
     
  33. physteach

    physteach Companion

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    I have the kids for a certain number of hours per week. If I can't do enough teaching in the allotted time, then that is something I need to work on. I think kids do enough during the day, homework is an added stress that is often unnecessary. Yes, I assign it on occasion, but it is mostly stuff that is more "fun" (ask a parent/sibling about the topic we are studying) and I grade it based on whether an attempt was made.
     
  34. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Aficionado

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    When I get home all I want to do is watch T.V. and do as little school work as possible. I want to spend time with my friends and family, socialize, go for coffee, etc. I assume the 7-year-olds in my class and their families feel the same way. Everyone has worked hard all day... who wants to take it home with them??

    My students also have long bus rides and (I hope) early bed times. I respect family time too much to send home more school work. I encourage them to read daily because that's a great life habit. I point them to a online math program our school subscribes to if they would like to have their child do something educational on the computer.

    If you must send home more work, I would keep it under 20 minutes at this age. I used to have a high school math teacher that always told us to stop after 20 minutes - it meant we didn't understand what we were doing if it took that long. Why would we expect more from little kids??

    I trust that even without homework in grade 2, my students will be well rounded, happy individuals. That's all I want for them.
     
  35. AdamnJakesMommy

    AdamnJakesMommy Habitué

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    What I do is I is I select the work I deem necessary for the content I am teaching. My students are learning (hopefully) that the harder we work, the less time we waste, the less we take home. My goal everyday is for them to have the opportunity to start working on homework, and if we really work our tales off we may have 10 or 15 minutes of class left and can finish our "homework" at school. What it really is, is I have a guided practice assignment and an independent practice assignment. Where independent takes place-- I don't care, it really is all up to them. Waste my time, and I waste theirs because my work is going to get done. Work hard with the time allotted in class, go home with less school work and more time to do things they enjoy.
     
  36. ms.irene

    ms.irene Connoisseur

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    This is where I am, too. If we get through all the reading, writing, listening, and speaking practice in class (I teach 100-minute blocks), why load more on top? They are expected to study nightly and if they choose not to, their grades will reflect that. I guess I have made up my mind where I stand on the issue! :cool:
     
  37. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    I have found that if done right, HW can be a helpful thing. Even Robert Marzano came out in favor of it, after he saw all the research showing that it can help. There are 3 times HW might be wrong:

    1. If too much HW is given. There is little or no research showing over 1 hour of HW for any grade grades 8 and under is helpful.

    2. If the HW has work that the students are not able to do on their own. HW should be able to be done independently. Anyone who thinks they can get 100% of parents, 100% of the school nights to help their children with HW, live in dreamland.

    3. HW given to young children. HW for pre-school and Kindergarten often shows close to no benefit.

    Done correctly, I am in favor of HW.
     
  38. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    I don't think homework is bad, but it all depends on how meaningful it is.
    1. time: obviously it shouldn't take a whole afternoon to do it. In departmentalized setting each teacher should consider that he's not the only one assigning homework, so a student might have homework from 5-6 different classes.
    2. why have it? Some content or subject might not need it. For math it's probably very helpful to practice it at home, keeps it fresh in the mind, same with foreign language. History, science, English, it depends. Maybe a quick glance at terms, formulas, etc, or practicing vocabulary, some reading, but it shouldn't every single day.
    3. should be able to be done independently, without parents and without internet or computer. Not everyone has it, and not every one has parents that can actually help.

    Homework has a purpose, it's not just busy work.
     
  39. ku_alum

    ku_alum Aficionado

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    For those who think almost nightly homework for math is ideal at the HS level, how many problems are ideal?
     
  40. orangetea

    orangetea Connoisseur

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    I assign about 5-10 problems per night, but it depends on what we covered in class. I think too much more than that isn't beneficial. But some topics may require more problems.
     
  41. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    Aug 29, 2014

    More like spending hours on Facebook, playing Call of Duty on their own, and watching Nicki Minaj on MTV calling people stupid h03s.
     
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