Why do you want to teach here?

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by CDOR79, Jun 30, 2018.

  1. CDOR79

    CDOR79 Comrade

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    Jun 30, 2018

    To those that have served on interview committees, I seek your assistance!

    During my last interview,I was asked why I want to switch from private to public school. I’m wondering if there’s an answer that’s “best” to answer with...

    I know part of it is saying WHY you’d like to work in that district, which brings me to one more question....

    If I want to say that the district has a great reputation and is rated let’s say 43 out of 210 schools in the state, how would I word that? Lol. I’m thinking it’s better to say it’s in the “top something...percentile...?” but can’t decide if I want to make it into a percentage or fraction or what. Any thoughts?

    Sorry if that’s confusing...
     
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  3. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    Jul 1, 2018

    Tell them you are excited to be a part of a top tier, highly ranked district. To rank in the top 20th percentile is no small feat.

    As for why the move to public schools, I would mention that working in such a district would be a great challenge, providing opportunities for growth as a teacher.
     
  4. CDOR79

    CDOR79 Comrade

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    Jul 1, 2018

    That’s what I was thinking, Vicki!

    My answer for the switch for the last interview was to open myself to more opportunities, for growth, and to work in a different “culture”- changing from Catholic to public school.
     
  5. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    I wouldn’t just say that you want to work there because they are highly ranked. I would research how they got there (like what programs or instructional philosophy do they have), and then I would answer by saying that you want to work there because of those specific programs or the philosophy. Explain that it relates to your own beliefs about education (assuming it does).

    Everyone interviewing probably wants to work there because it is highly ranked. By answering with more specifics, you’ll show both that you’ve done your research and that you’re a good fit because your beliefs align to theirs.
     
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  6. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Phenom

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    Jul 1, 2018

    You could say you like the school’s mission statement and that it exactly aligns with your teaching philosophy. You might try letting the interview panel know that you did not like the direction that your old school was going after the new administration came in, that administration was restructuring staff, etc. If you don’t feel comfortable saying the former, then you could say that you wanted to start at a new school and welcome the opportunity to grow. Finally, you could talk about the stats of the school and how you want to be a part of school that embodies academic excellence and to work in a setting with like-minded individuals with a passion for teaching that you have.

    Research the school first. They like to see that you’ve done your homework and have a genuine interest in the school. They can see if you are in it for a paycheck because there are obvious signs.

    Good luck and happy job hunting!
     
  7. geoteacher

    geoteacher Devotee

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    I agree with researching the school environment to find things that excite you and that you can share with them. It doesn't hurt to mention their particular academic successes, exciting access to technology or other resources, or the opportunity to be a part of a particularly collaborative teaching envirnement.
     
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  8. Been There

    Been There Habitué

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    Telling interview panels what they already know and repeating what they've heard from other candidates will take you only so far. What I've always found to be key is a personalized response that involves name-dropping specific individuals with whom they are well-acquainted. Everything else being equal, a high-stakes interview can be tipped in your favor if you've taken unusual and unexpected steps to gain insight from students, teachers, administrators, community members, business owners, university professors, etc. who are willing to be "interviewed" by you. Any relevant anecdotes that they may share and you can effectively use in your unique response will be most memorable and impressive. I can attest to having used this strategy TWICE with smashing success! Although both were for principalships, I suspect it would work for teaching positions too.
     
    Last edited: Jul 1, 2018
  9. CDOR79

    CDOR79 Comrade

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    So it IS a good idea to mention teachers that currently teach in that district and love it? Bc I actually know 2 and was wondering if I should mention them. I didn’t know if that was annoying to the interviewer(s) or not.
     
  10. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    Personally, I wouldn’t want to hear a name drop. I’d be fine hearing experiences you’ve had with the district. Like if you did observe in a classroom in the district, for example, I’d be fine hearing about that, even if you mention the teacher’s name. But, if you just said “I know so and so, and they love working here,” that would feel too artificial for my liking. A name drop isn’t going to be what gets you the job, and, in some cases, it could ruin your chances.
     
  11. CDOR79

    CDOR79 Comrade

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    After doing some research, it looks like this particualar School is OK as far as academics but nothing crazy. But the district seems to be fairly rated overall.

    It seems like it might be wise to just NOT go in that direction with my response.
     
  12. Been There

    Been There Habitué

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    Perhaps I might have given the wrong impression by mentioning the use of "name-dropping". I do know that two different superintendents in two different districts were noticeably impressed that I had made contact with highly-respected individuals that turned out to be their personal friends (one was a businessman and the other worked at Stanford). I guess I was just lucky - but, twice? Something to think about - don't leave any stone unturned if you really want the job.
     

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