Whole Language

Discussion in 'Montessori' started by mtiroly, Nov 25, 2009.

  1. mtiroly

    mtiroly Rookie

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    Nov 25, 2009

    Has anyone teaching primary or lower el. ever added to the traditional Montessori language materials (which I believe are mostly phonics based, yes?) with other reading methods, such as Whole Language?
     
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  3. tracykaliski

    tracykaliski Connoisseur

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    Nov 27, 2009

    I would be very careful using whole language. As an Orton Gillingham tutor, (which is very phonics based, by the way) I have seen lots of children who needed remediation at a later time because they were taught how to read using whole language.

    One of the beauties of the Montessori materials is that she's got the green sandpaper letters which lend themselves excellently to teaching phonics.

    Which training program did you attend?
     
  4. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Nov 27, 2009

    There are students who are going to 'click' with some methods and not others...I wouldn't be so quick to bash whole language, or phonics, or Montessori. Creative and thoughtful educational professionals take the best from a variety of sources to differentiate learning in their classrooms and to facilitate understanding for their students.
     
  5. mtiroly

    mtiroly Rookie

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    Nov 28, 2009

    Thank you for your thoughts!

    I ask this question as I am trying to decide whether Montessori training would be the right fit for me. Much of the Montessori philosophy resonates with me. Yet, I agree that different methods work for different students. For example:

    I will never forget a student we had in our Montessori Children's House classroom several years ago. She was in our room for the entire three year cycle, but by the spring of kindergarten year she was still having problems with graphophonic skills. You could tell she very much wanted to be doing the reading works her peers were doing, she was working so hard. The lead teacher finally decided to have the student start doing some of the reading works, even though there was probably only a 70% chance she could correctly match letter to sound. -Having the letters in context of actual words made all the difference for this student. She started soaring! And you could tell how proud she was of herself.

    It seems this student needed an avenue other than the traditional Montessori course of action.

    It's really valuable to hear people's thoughts. Many thanks!
     
  6. Youngteacher226

    Youngteacher226 Enthusiast

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    Nov 28, 2009

    All of this summed up is the whole purpose for BALANCED LITERACY. There is no "one way fits all" to teaching reading. Take a little bit of all of the methods so that you are sure you are reaching all the readers in your class.
     
  7. word girl

    word girl Rookie

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    Nov 28, 2009

    "Whole Language" got a bad rap in the 90's, but it seems to me that a 'balanced literacy' program uses components of all reading strategies to help all children, no matter their learning preference.
     
  8. holley.padula

    holley.padula Rookie

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    Dec 28, 2009

    I found a mixed approach works best.
     

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