Who is more likely to get a middle school position? (2 part question).

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Sarge, Jun 27, 2016.

  1. Sarge

    Sarge Enthusiast

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    (be honest because I think you all know which candidate is me;))
    Assuming it is for social science

    Candidate 1 - Just out of college, completed credential from an accredited program. Good student teaching record. Student taught the same grade and subject as the position. Has all required NCLB, ELD, authorizations and credentials for the position.

    Candidate 2 - 20+ years teaching. Currently employed. Also student taught in middle school, however after 7 years of successful teaching in middle school and secondary, took a test to get a multiple subject credential and moved to primary grades. Taught first grade for 13 years and second grade for the last two. Also has all required NCLB and ELD authorizations and credentials for the position.

    Who would be more likely to get the job?

    Now change it up a bit ....

    Assume the subject is ELA

    Everything above is the same, except that Candidate 1 has a regular English credential. In other words, he or she is authorized to teach high school English. However, student teaching was in middle school and it's still a middle school position. All ELD and NCLB qualifications are there.

    Candidate 2 still has the same 20+ years of experience. In middle school, he taught history/ELA core. However, his credential is in social science and he has a supplementary authorization in ELA. In other words, he can't teach English above 9th grade. He is, however, certified a "Highly Qualified Teacher" in ELA due to coursework and experience.

    Who would be more likely to get the job?
     
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  3. mathteachertobe

    mathteachertobe Cohort

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    I think it depends on the general approach to structuring teaching schedules at the school. There are some middle schools that want cored teachers that can teach both SS and English, whether by having a multiple subjects credential or multiple single subject endorsements. Even if they are currently hiring a single-subject position, someone with the flexibility of candidate 2 has an advantage.

    Middle schools that are or are moving to a more departmentalized structure would probably prefer the newer candidate.

    Do you feel you have a strong answer to the question of why you want middle school after 15+ years of early elementary?
     
  4. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    I feel like they would choose the second candidate. Experience seems to trump everything else in most cases. Especially since Middle School wouldn't be completely new to them and they know what to expect.
     
  5. Sarge

    Sarge Enthusiast

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    That's hard to say. There's the real answer and the BS answer.
    The real answer is that I just feel I would be more effective with middle school than second grade, where I am now. And that holds true for any elementary grade except first grade.
    I could go back to first grade, but after 13 years, I wanted a change. I thought moving to second would be it, but it made things worse.
    I'm just not seeing myself as an elementary teacher any more. Having the same kids all day is no longer fun.
    Then there's the issue of math and science. I never was a science teacher. I avoided science and math in college as much as I could. Consequently, it has been very hard for me to teach it in a way that engages students. ELA and social science, I can do it, easily. Science and math, not so much. There, I'm just following the curriculum.
    In first grade, you could engage students with the whole "learning to read" thing. But in second, they mostly know how to read or reading is something that has begun to frustrate them to the point of not wanting to do it.
    I have a great rapport with the 6th, 7th, and 8th graders at my school. Almost a cult following. I had a great rapport with my students when I taught those grades.
    That's the real reason. How do I turn that into something that a school would really want to hear in an interview or read in a cover letter?
     
  6. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

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    Jun 27, 2016

    Did you decide to not apply for admin positions?
     
  7. Sarge

    Sarge Enthusiast

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    I've applied for a boatload of admin positions. However, (and this is in answer to mathteachertobe's question) my thought is that if I am having trouble getting a AP position, part of the reason is that I need more recent middle school or secondary teaching experience, since most AP jobs are in middle or high schools.
    I've had three AP interviews - one in my own district and two in Oakland.
     
  8. Sarge

    Sarge Enthusiast

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    And I'm still applying for admin positions. I've even branched out into some principal positions as well.
     
  9. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

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    Do you think you'd ever be able to land an admin job in your own district? Just curious because I have a friend who was told by one of the panelists (after interviewing year after year for admin positions within our district), "If I were you, I'd take a look outside the district!" I'm sure that was disheartening for her to hear!
     
  10. mathteachertobe

    mathteachertobe Cohort

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    Are you considering across the bridge from Oakland? I teach in SF, and I think you need to have an active application in our system to see all openings. Some are on EdJoin, but I don't think all of them are.

    As far as answering the why middle school question, are you currently at a K-8? If so, you could focus on the connection you feel to students in that age range and also how you are interested in a new challenge and want to focus on developing literacy in somewhat older students. (Bearing in mind this advice is coming from a math teacher.) But my not well-off school actually spends significant $$ on a full-time librarian because of the impact it has on student literacy
     
  11. Sarge

    Sarge Enthusiast

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    If we are speaking of the same district, that's the conventional wisdom here. All the new admins in the last few years came from outside the district.
     

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