Which teaching job should I choose?

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by teacher girl, Sep 4, 2011.

  1. teacher girl

    teacher girl Comrade

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    I'm applying for 2 positions for a special education teacher---=- one that is Elementary -- looking for a teacher to work with LD and ED- cross categorical----- or highschool teach LD and ASD.---- Which one should I go for? It's my first time teaching and I want one with less stress, or easiest to do? What do you think?
     
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  3. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Sep 4, 2011

    It's Labor Day weekend in a brutal job market. You should go 300% for both of them.

    They'll receive at least several hundred applications for both positions, if not thousands.

    This is NOT a good time to play "which is the easier job?" If you're hoping to do a good job and affect change, no teaching job will be easy.
     
  4. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    I wouldn't count on any teaching position, especially your first, to be easy or not stressful. As far as which one of those will be a better fit for you, the first question to ask yourself is which age of student you are most comfortable working with. For me, high school would be a far better fit than early elementary.
     
  5. ciounoi

    ciounoi Cohort

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    What Mrs. C said. However, with elementary students, you are generally dealing with very easy subject matter and the students are usually more motivated (they haven't been as discouraged for quite as long!). I'd go for the elementary if given the choice.
     
  6. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Sep 4, 2011

    Take the one you are offered.
     
  7. Beth2004

    Beth2004 Maven

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    This.

    Like Alice said, put all of your effort into applying to both of them and if you're offered one of them, accept it.
     
  8. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Apply for whatever you are certified to teach
     
  9. WaterfallLady

    WaterfallLady Enthusiast

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    People who are certified in Special Education are generally certified for K-12.

    If you get an offer, take it. The job market is rough.
     
  10. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    At least in my state, most teachers are certified k-12, but aren't actually "highly qualified" for k-12. I technically have a k-12 license, but I'm only highly qualified for elementary since that's what my gen ed license is in. In my home state, I also could have done special ed language arts k-12 because I was a reading specialist and had taken the ELA praxis. Generally though, if you want to be a high school special ed teacher, you have to also be certified in whatever subject you're going to teach. So to do math you'd have to have your special ed license and your high school math license. At least for mild/mod anyway...I don't know since I've never looked into it but mod/severe might be highly qualified all the way up to k-12 since you wouldn't be doing the grade level academics at all anyway.

    I'm going to disagree with some of the comments here...I absolutely wouldn't just take any job that I didn't want simply for the fact that it was a job. You don't wnat to take something that's going to make you miserable. That's not fair to you or to the students. If you're only comfortable with one of those age groups (and highly qualified) then only take that one. I guess it depends on what you're willing to "give up" on in your job standards. Personally, I was willing to sacrifice location (I applied EVERYWHERE across the country) in order to only apply for the age group and disability categories I wanted. For me, elementary and mild/mod. were non-negotiable. I wouldn't have taken a severe needs (I was actually offered 2 positions, and turned them down) or a middle school/high school job because I know it's not a good fit for me. However, I had two friends from my elementary mild/mod. program who took jobs outside of their comfort zones in order to stay close to home, because for them that was non-negotiable. One took an English inclusion job in high school and another took a preschool multiple disabilities position. So it's up to what is most important for you.
     
  11. WaterfallLady

    WaterfallLady Enthusiast

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    Right, I totally get what you are saying. She implied she was comfortable with both.
     
  12. inhisgrip20

    inhisgrip20 Comrade

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    Sep 12, 2011

    Teacher Girl... you have stated in numerous posts here lately that you are currently a college student working on your special education degree. One recent post from you was: "I am still a student in my special education program-- so I am still pretty dumb about alot of things.lol."

    In my opinion, you should not be applying for any special education teaching positions until you have completed your program and are qualified/certified to teach in that area. You may want to look into becoming a paraprofessional/teacher's assistant so you can get hands on training as you prepare for your teaching career.

    No teaching job is easy or stress free. You will only be adding to your stress level if you take a job which you are not trained to do. There are specific teaching methods and best practices for teaching students with disabilities that you will need to know in order to be effective in any teaching position.

    From what I gathered from your previous posts, I assume you are just starting out in your degree program. I apologize if I assumed incorrectly and you are about to graduate. :)
     
  13. MrShiva

    MrShiva Rookie

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    Sep 12, 2011

    Appreciate the job that they offered to you.
     
  14. Rosy0114

    Rosy0114 Rookie

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    Sep 12, 2011

    Don't wanna discourage you, but no teaching job is guaranteed less stress. Especially in the special education market. Go in with a positive attitude and be willing to accept feedback and suggestions from your co-workers. You'll do great with those two qualities!
     

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