Which master's should a single subject teacher get to be more marketable?

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by Michelle, Jun 25, 2009.

  1. Michelle

    Michelle Guest

    Jun 25, 2009

    Since I'm postponing my last phase of my teacher education program until the economy picks up, I am going to go back to school for my master's. Since I will be teaching single subject English, I had always just assumed I would get my maseter's in English. However, while browsing job postings, I'm noticing that many state that a master's is preferable although they don't specify which master's. I've also notice that pay scales at school are commensurate with how much continuing education one has (although these don't specify what kind of continuing education is required, either).

    So my question is, as a single subject English teacher, would someone interested in pursuing additional education be better off getting a master's in, say, English or would some sort of master's in Education be more marketable?
     
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  3. shasha379

    shasha379 Devotee

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    Jun 25, 2009

    Mine is in curriculum and instruction, but i teach all subjects except science. A few years down the line I plan to teach history on the college level. By then I will have a master's in some type of history. I guess it depends on your future plans.
     
  4. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    I'm getting mine in curriculum, instruction and assessment. If you plan on teaching, I would probably go with an education masters.
     
  5. Ron6103

    Ron6103 Habitué

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    I think it depends on your ultimate goals. If you want to teach at the college level at some point, a master's in English would be best. if you plan to stay in secondary education, you have some other options.

    If you want to stay as a classroom teacher, something like curriculum and instruction, or a related Education degree would work well. If you think you might want to go into Administration, then you'd need an Educational Leadership program.

    I personally, took a 3rd route. I'm interested in instructional technology, so I'm taking a Masters in that, and working on my technology specialist certification.
     
  6. Muttling

    Muttling Devotee

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    What is your bachelor's in?
     
  7. Mrs. K.

    Mrs. K. Enthusiast

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    Jun 25, 2009

    I notice you're in LA - I got my MA in Secondary English Education at Cal State Northridge. It was the perfect program for me - geared toward the working teacher. I had started the MA program in English in the Rhetoric and Comp concentration, but the workload was impossible. There's a new cohort starting in August - here's a link: http://www.csun.edu/education/sed/english/index.html

    Additional thought - I notice that you aren't teaching yet, and this is a program for teachers with some experience, so perhaps an English program would make more sense.
     
  8. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Jun 25, 2009

    I'm going to follow up on Muttling's probable thought. If your BA was not in English, it would make a great deal of sense to do a master's in English, whether composition/rhetoric or literature, even if the workload's stiff: teaching programs, by virtue of being teaching programs, don't tend to go into content in a great deal of depth, and you're quite likely to see English differently when you get done than when you began.
     
  9. Michelle

    Michelle Guest

    Jun 30, 2009

    Thanks all for the replies.

    My bachelor's was in English, and I'm weighing my long-term career goals. I've narrowed them down to either teaching high school English, or teaching English at the university level. I'm leaning more and more strongly towards the latter, so I'm thinking that a master's program in English may be my best bet. However, I do want to spend some time teaching at the high school level.
     
  10. 5thgraderocks

    5thgraderocks Companion

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    Jul 21, 2009

    Reading Masters are in high demand in Wisconsin.
     
  11. UCLACareerChngr

    UCLACareerChngr Comrade

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    Jul 24, 2009

    If you're serious about teaching English at the University level, I would guess you're probably going to need a PhD in English, not just a Masters.
     
  12. SportsJunkie25

    SportsJunkie25 Rookie

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    Jul 25, 2009

    Ditto.

    Masters = Community College
    Ph.D. = 4 Year University

    I guess it depends on which college level you'd be pursuing. With that said, I'd still go for a Ph.D. A Ph.D. will give you more opportunities.
     
  13. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    It's usually harder to find teachers in the areas of math & science.
     
  14. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Maven

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    I am thinking about looking into that subject area. I have seen a ridiculous number of Reading/Literacy job postings. Some even prefer the candidates to be duel certified in English (which I am!).
     
  15. myty1124

    myty1124 Rookie

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    Aug 7, 2009

    I have run into aspiring teachers with master degrees, who have had a lot of trouble getting that first high school job because of their master's degree. It appears that many districts would rather hire someone without a master's in order to pay less.
     

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