Which is better for a high school drawing lesson...

Discussion in 'Art Teachers' started by Tom Dent, Feb 7, 2010.

  1. Tom Dent

    Tom Dent New Member

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    Feb 7, 2010

    ...letting the students stand and work at easels or on work benches, or do like most public high schools and just let the students lay their sketchbooks on a flat table as if they were writing? I've found the former to be better for developing good drawing skills, but I want everyone else's opinions.
     
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  3. Samothrace

    Samothrace Cohort

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    Feb 8, 2010

    My highschool never had easels or work benches.

    However...I would say it's up to the student to have an option. Some kinds are more comfortable sitting vs. standing. For looser gestural drawings it's better to stand b/c your arm has more movement. But I would probably give my kids a choice if I taught highschool, I teach elementary.

    Or it depends on the goal of a project/lesson. I know I went to school with kids that were really technical in their drawing. I could never see them standing at an easel doing the technical stuff they did.
     
  4. Anne wmcosuvamu

    Anne wmcosuvamu Companion

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    Feb 9, 2010

    As far as in general high school art classes, I have no idea (being in the English Ed field), but from personal experience, I think easels are much better for drawing and painting.

    We didn't have easels in high school. When I got to college, my drawing skills improved dramatically with the introduction of easels. Now I never draw or paint flat unless I have to. I own two of my own easels so I can have two projects going simultaneously. :lol:
     
  5. Securis

    Securis Cohort

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    Feb 9, 2010

    As Samothrace says, options are best. I find that drawing flat creates some problems with understanding proportions while doing life drawing. Having a drawing surface that can be tilted might be best for that. Lap-boards and drawing tables are examples of what I mean. Then, I've always enjoyed working on a tilted surface to keep from the need to lean over your work.

    At the same time, other than proportion, I can't think of any detriment to allowing them to draw flat.
     
  6. Crzy_ArtTeacher

    Crzy_ArtTeacher Comrade

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    Feb 10, 2010

    I think it's a personal preference. To do a large gesture drawing an easel may be more appropriate, and for a more detailed piece of work a flatter surface could work better too. I found I liked both methods while experimenting in college.
     

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