Which behaviors do you just ignore?

Discussion in 'Behavior Management' started by grade1teacher, Dec 14, 2006.

  1. grade1teacher

    grade1teacher Companion

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    Dec 14, 2006

    I'm sure that this will vary from teacher to teacher, but I guess I'm just looking for confirmation that I am (or am not) on the right track.
    I'm really trying not to let the little things bother me, but sometimes it seems like its hard to get a word in edgewise!
    For some of my students, I feel that if I adress it right away, they realize that it is disturbing others and stop. But there are other students who are all to happy to get the negative attention and I feel that ignoring it might be the only solution. (On the other hand I keep thinking they need to have consequences!! But the consequences just havent worked for some kids)
    So do you ignore these behaviors? Is it just a 6 year old developmental thing?
    humming, spontaneous singing, vocal clicks, noises and roars (!!). These students are not on the autism spectrum.

    What other behaviors do you ignore?
     
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  3. thekeykeeper

    thekeykeeper New Member

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    Dec 15, 2006

    Bad Kids around the world

    I'm an English Teacher at an Elem. School in Japan, I have had problems with boys and some of the girls as well. As for the boys I see this type of behavior alot, spoiled little brats that have to have it their way or the get violent towards the other kids. But things are alot different in the Japanese Edu. System, in the American system boys and girls go to locker rooms to change clothes, but in Japan they change right in the classroom, I can't stand to see alittle boy or girl changing their clothes right in front of me. I have had boys punch me in the crotch here and nothing done to them at all, girls have grabbed my butt and crotch, put their hands in my pockets, things that make me jump and always say DAME DAYO! Which means stop it in Japanese. I have had kids come up and say nasty things to me in English but they don't even understand what they are saying because they hear it on TV alot, Japan does get alot of American TV Shows.

    But after all is said and done you have to realize that it is only a handful of bad apples that make the bunch look bad. Compared to the bad kids the kids that listen and learn outnumber them alot, Some of the girls in class have even kicked a student out of class. I wanted to laugh out loud but I told the girls, thank you.

    You can always pinpoint the ones who act up in class because they are always around their friends trying to act cool, so the best thing to do with those kids (in my experiences) is to separate them or when you are doing something fun don't let them play, I have had many children cry in my English class because they acted up by starting to fight or some other stupid thing.
     
  4. Malcolm

    Malcolm Enthusiast

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    Dec 15, 2006

    Sometimes ignorning the problem is the correct solution. If the student is creating the problem to get attention, he will stop when he finds out he does not get the attention he is looking for. I use this strategy with students who want to argue. Of course, there are some problems that just cannot be ignored...
     
  5. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Dec 15, 2006

    I have really begun using the phrase "I'm not here to argue" or with some students "Are you arguing with me?" Many students (even my own child) have trouble recognizing the difference between good discourse (telling their side, etc) and arguing. Introducing and giving a repetitive phrase every time you need to use it, really does help teach them when it is time to back off. They may not get it at first, but they will. Don't accept any comments after that. Keep repeating the same phrase until they be quiet or walk off. If they keep aggressively going, then consequence needs to be put in place. Personally, I don't punish a kid for not knowing the difference (even when it seems obvious to us and even when they can answer after we ask). I do give them the way out. If they don't take it, then they have to learn the consequence of their choice.

    My own child tries to be funny. He doesn't realize when his sarcasm crosses the line. I remember my father giving me the phrase "Are you trying to be smart with me?" It was my way out. After that...whooooboy!
     
  6. teach 4th

    teach 4th Rookie

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    Dec 19, 2006

    I do the same thing. I will ask, "Do you really think I am going to argue with you?" Some students think that I will continue to argue for a while. Usually if I say I won't argue, they give up.
     
  7. JenL

    JenL Comrade

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    Dec 20, 2006

    i think you have to find what makes each student click....i teach first also and you are right on track about the clicking, humming, pencil tapping. i think most of the time they don't even realize that they are doing it...at least in my class. usually a gentle reminder if it is distracting, geared at the whole class. can the pencil stopping stop please? i hear humming right now we need to be.... things like that work with my class but they may not work with your class. you have to figure out what is right for your kids. no two classes are alike.
     
  8. Tigers

    Tigers Habitué

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    Dec 30, 2006

    If you are choosing to go with the entire positive reinforcement philosophy, ignoring all of these things is a start. But, you must remember that for every behavior you are trying to extinguish, you must reinforce the correct behavior. So, if you decide making sounds is something that you want to extinguish...then, the next step is to ignore the sounds, and give the children some form of reinforcement for remaining quiet. If I remember right, this is supposed to be immediate, at first. of course, this does not mean only thank a list of children who are not humming when a couple are humming (remember to seek out moments where the children who are often diruptive are quiet).
     
  9. tm91784

    tm91784 Comrade

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    Dec 30, 2006

    If a child is not disturbing the class and not harming the other students, then it is usually something that can be ignored. Another way that I can tell whether to ignore or not is to try ignoring and see if it works.
     
  10. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Dec 30, 2006

    Sometimes you can infer the reason for the problem. A child with a nasty cold will sometimes put his head down. I'll offer a nurse's pass, but the kids know that they're not going home unless they have a fever or are throwing up, so they don't always take me up on it. If that child puts his head down, I'll ignore it. Another child who chooses not to pay attention won't get off so easy.
     

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