Where can my past experience fit in schools now?

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by bslk, Jun 21, 2007.

  1. bslk

    bslk Rookie

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    Jun 21, 2007

    I am a dietitian but have always enjoyed teaching and feel I should have gone this route years ago in college instead (I'm 38 now). I've been considering going back to become certified to teach but am very reluctant when I see how hard it is to land jobs (esp. elem. ed.). I live in the Chicago suburbs and know there's no shortage here.
    My question is:

    Where could my past education and experience fit in in jr or senior high? I know back 20yrs ago, we had Foods teachers, consumer ed., health, etc. Are these types of classes still taught or have times changed and the subjects "evolved" somewhat? I have a strong background in science/health/nutrition, etc and also quite a bit of teaching experience (with older people in group settings and one on one) but don't know how this can translate to teaching in schools...
    and don't know what the demand for teachers like this would be.
    Any thoughts or input would be very much appreciated...
    Thanks.
     
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  3. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Jun 21, 2007

    Hi and welcome!

    I'm guessing you have enough science credits to easily become certified in either health or biology.

    Hit the website for your state Dept. of Education; look under "alternate certification." The answers will probably be there.

    For demand, you would have to check with the Chicago crew; there are several teachers here from that area.
     
  4. bslk

    bslk Rookie

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    Jun 21, 2007

    Do schools generally still offer classes such as Foods, Consumer Ed., or something similar? My degree is BS in Human Resources and Family Studies/Dietetics.
     
  5. DustyPete

    DustyPete Rookie

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    Ya, health or biology would be the way to go. I don't think health/pathology is emphasized enough in biology. Students learn about all these organic compounds and organ systems but they are never taught how to keep them healthy.

    Anyway, it is often the case that after a few years a school will allow you to found a relevant science class as long as you write the curriculum for it. I personally know a lot of students in my Biology classes that were interested in nutrition and I think you could fill some sections of such a class.
     
  6. MissFrizzle

    MissFrizzle Virtuoso

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    Jun 21, 2007

  7. bslk

    bslk Rookie

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    Jun 21, 2007

    I will have to look for that thread - thanks for the info.
    Thanks for the replies. Twenty years have gone by since I was in high school and I was just wondering what types of classes are required and/or offered that would fit with my background. I know that there's a lot more out there, in general, re: nutrition/wt. loss/sports nutrition/wellness than there was back then but not sure how that has or hasn't changed course offerings in the schools.
    All your input is greatly appreciated. Thanks for taking the time...
     
  8. chicagoturtle

    chicagoturtle Fanatic

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    Jun 21, 2007

    That job fair is only for Chicago Public Schools. FYI.

    I don't know much about the burbs at all, but here there are areas that need math/science teachers. Not in the best of areas, but if you really want to give back, that may be a good route.

    Also, some CPS schools have their own health centers. Some in High School and some in the elementaries. If you want to know more about that I can maybe help you.

    The ALT certification info is also on the CPS website. Don't know much about that.

    If you are willing to come to the city and aren't anti charter, you maybe really interested in a charter school called Namaste (hope I spelled it right). It is in back of the yards. http://www.namastecharterschool.org/ Their whole philosophy is health and wellness.
     
  9. bslk

    bslk Rookie

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    Jun 21, 2007

    Not sure I could go back to a long commute again... but I will check out the website and give it some thought.
    I know this is a stupid question, but what is a charter school exactly?
     
  10. MissFrizzle

    MissFrizzle Virtuoso

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    oops, I don't know anything about Chicago- I live in NY, just thought it would help you.
     
  11. chicagoturtle

    chicagoturtle Fanatic

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    I'm not sure I'm the best explainer but I'll try.

    First off Charter schools aren't members of the CTU (union).

    Therefore, they all differ and are run under a "charter" which is their governance. They use public dollars, but I think many use private dollars too.

    Since they aren't part of CPS they can create their own rules. Sometimes this means longer hours and lower wages for teachers, but some teachers also find the peace of mind of not working for a huge school system worth it.

    I hope that helps.
     
  12. bslk

    bslk Rookie

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    Jun 22, 2007

    Makes sense... what does this mean in terms of NCLB, ISAT's, etc.?
    Are charter schools more like private schools that way or like public?
    Sorry if I'm getting off topic... just curious. Thanks
     
  13. chicagoturtle

    chicagoturtle Fanatic

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    I'm pretty sure that they have to do ISAT. Not sure though. I work for CPS.
     
  14. cheeryteacher

    cheeryteacher Enthusiast

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    Jun 27, 2007

    Charter schools use public funding, so still must be comply with NCLB. They do however tend to approach curriculum differently, hence the health and wellness spin of the previous charter school mentioned. Most have longer hours or school year-or both. They must answer to the state and to whomever commissioned their charter (usually an outside educational foundation or university).
     

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