When to give up for this year?

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by sunshine24, Aug 29, 2013.

  1. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    Sep 15, 2013

    Many schools will be looking for long-term subs, and there are always mid-year replacements. I know at my school, we're going to get approval for a new special ed teacher in about two weeks. I can't speak for the NYC area, but I know western New York was extremely difficult to find work. If moving is at all an option, the general DC metro area is a fabulous spot for jobs, and quite a few New York and Pennsylvania teachers end up here.
     
  2. sunshine24

    sunshine24 Comrade

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    Sep 15, 2013

    gr3teacher: I wish that relocating was an option for me, but at this stage of my life, it really isn't. But, I have heard of some teachers from the NY area moving around the country just to land jobs...it's such a terrible job market right now.
    I am trying to remain optimistic about late hirings and/or mid-year replacements. Right now, I am figuring that I can afford to play the sub game through Dec-Jan (if I have to and praying that something full time comes up by then), but financially after that I will have to re-evaluate yet again and most likely settle for a non-teaching job.
     
  3. jforegolf

    jforegolf Rookie

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    Sep 16, 2013

    I have to tell you sunshine that you confuse me a great deal. In several of your posts you hint that you are incredibly anxious to get a job as a teacher but then when offered up with suggestions on ways to improve your chances of landing a job you counter the suggestion with reasons why the job is not a good fit. People have said, look outside NYC. You counter with, the commute is to far. People say look at private schools. You say the benefits and job security are not as good( two not accurate statements by the way.)

    The bottom line is this, you can't say you want to get hired to be a teacher and then just limit yourself to perfect jobs. I commute over an hour and a half to my school each day, not because I enjoy it, but because I wanted to teach and this was the job that I was hired for. This job has ended up being a fantastic job that I've enjoyed tremendously. You need to expand your search and take a job that may not be perfect because that's what most people have to do.
     
  4. sunshine24

    sunshine24 Comrade

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    Sep 16, 2013

    jforegolf: Believe when I say that I know there is no such thing as the perfect job. After a 3 year search, I am painfully aware of that fact! I have greatly appreciated all of the job search advice that I have received here, but unfortunately, I have thought of and tried the same things before coming here. The issue with commuting is a big one for me. The morning rush time commute here is crazy, in any direction. I have been looking for jobs that are about 20-30 min away (in good traffic) because the daily morning commute would end up taking a minimum of 1.5 hours and would be just about the same coming home in the afternoon (which is doable, but limits my search radius). I cannot look for jobs that are any further, for example 1.5 hour away (in good traffic) because the morning commute would be upwards of 3 hours and the afternoon upwards of 2 hours!

    If you read through my previous posts, you would know that I have looked into private schools and am open to working in them. The problem is: they are not hiring! The benefits/job security is a matter of opinion, I guess. I believe that they are better/more secure in the public school system; you do not. I am going based on what I have learned from speaking with other professionals who work in both settings.

    Yes, my ultimate goal is to land a job in the public schools. But for now, I just need a full time job and despite how badly I want to teach, there still have to be limits in anyone's search. And I cannot do anything about the fact that there are simply no available vacancies here where I live. I know of no one who has gotten hired here in the last few years! I can send resumes, walk into schools, and research schools in my area all day, every day, but that will not do anything if there are NO positions available! The problem is not that I do not know where to look or am unwilling to look for jobs. The problem is what do you do when there are simply no jobs to apply to (substitutes do not even get called that often here because of all the excessed staff/ATR's in the district)? That is why you see me tossing around the idea of having to leave the education field just to have a full time job.
     
  5. MissPapa

    MissPapa Comrade

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    Sep 16, 2013

    gr3atteacher - I JUST got hired as a sub in two schools with opportunities for it to become full-time. No standard interview took place, they just want to see how I do until a position opens up (one of the school actually anticipates a job opening).

    As for everyone who talked with me earlier, I decided to not deal with charter schools. I am already an employee with the dept. of ed, and leaving for full-time work at a charter school might be a quick fix, but if anything happens that leads to termination, it might hurt my career. So I choose to stay as a sub, as much as it pains me. But I am getting all the help I can get and those two sub positions might help me. Who knows :)
     
  6. sunshine24

    sunshine24 Comrade

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    Sep 16, 2013

    MissPapa: Congrats! I am so happy for you :) I was wondering about you this week.
    Did you get hired as a permanent sub or will these 2 schools call you as needed on a daily basis (per diem)? Are in the NYC area and with the DOE? It sounds like a step in the right direction for you...fingers crossed that it turns into something full time.
    I think that you made the right call on the charter schools. As I said before, I had a horrible experience with one, but as I researched more about them in general (trying to keep an open mind), I too, decided the short term benefits would not outweigh how a charter could hurt my career in the long term. I've heard a couple of horror stories from old professors.
     
  7. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Sep 16, 2013

    Look long and hard enough, and you'll find horror stories about every single job on the planet.

    The reality is that, if you want to teach, you may have to change your expectations. (I won't say "lower" because the Catholic school in which I teach is the ideal workplace for me, even though lots of people wouldn't consider teaching in a Catholic school...their loss. We hired about 10 new teachers this year. Anyone who chose not to apply because it's not a public school lost out on one amazing school. But the jobs didn't go empty... there were plenty of qualified applicants from which to choose.)

    There are far, far fewer jobs than qualified teachers, and way way fewer in public schools. And far less than that in "good" public schools. Throw in the schools that are a 'reasonable' commute, and the pool gets even tinier. Then consider that school has already started, and the pool is significantly smaller.

    Each time you remove one of these conditions, you open up the pool a bit to include more possibilties.
     
  8. MissPapa

    MissPapa Comrade

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    Sep 16, 2013

    Aliceacc - I have a phone interview with a charter school tomorrow. I'm still going to take it just incase. But sofar with what has been leading my way, I may be in luck public school wise (and yes, I agree that no job is perfect). Also, I didn't just apply to schools in my area, but in vast locations as well. If I have to, I'll invest in getting a car if public transportation is going to be a hell of a commute. Keep in mind, I am keeping all my options open.

    Sunshine24 - Thank you! I already replied to your post earlier. I have just been busy since I surprisingly got sub assignments this week. The charter school I once visited (whom I'm getting the phone interview from) wasn't so bad. But again, public school is definitely my first choice. Also I said this in the other post, but sofar it's per-diem (I'm not sure about the second school that called me today, it'd be cool if it's permanent. They told me they'd have to enter me in SubCentral, could be jobs or could be only working in that school…I'll ask next time they call me).
     
  9. MissPapa

    MissPapa Comrade

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    Sep 20, 2013

    Funny story: I got rejected by that charter school. Little did I find out, they don't like hiring people who are dept of ed employees.

    I just wanted a full-time job!!!! Waaaaaahhhhh…

    Wasn't going to accept it anyway, it's just not for me. I figured it'd be something under my belt just incase, but still. In other news, I haven't heard from one of the schools who hired me as a sub since last Thursday and I worked at the D75 school today for the first time. Already got a week assignment for next week (on top of that, another from another school the following week). I'm meeting the principal on Monday. I'm definitely going to make sure I show great interest in getting hired.

    Also, someone that knows my mom is trying to push me in. Didn't hear from them yet, but we shall see. I may be in luck with public schools with all this networking going on :)
     

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