When the answers are obvious...

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by ms_chandler, Apr 9, 2008.

  1. ms_chandler

    ms_chandler Comrade

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    Apr 9, 2008

    I teach 7th grade English. We usually do exercises together or I call on each during activities. Very seldom do we do worksheets. I just find that kids glaze over at that point and some just write down anything. This brings me to my point...

    We are currently reading a novel (Tangerine by Edward Bloor), and I made up questions to go along with it. They are answering them individually. The kids know that I don't give away answers. However, I feel like these answers are pretty obvious. In times like this, do you still review answers? I don't want to seem unfair, but I also don't want to send the message, If you get lazy, I'll give the answers away. This is especially dangerous at this point in the year!

    Thanks!
     
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  3. ChangeAgent

    ChangeAgent Comrade

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    Apr 9, 2008

    I just completed The Odyssey with my ninth grade learning support class. I created comprehension questions (ranging from multiple choice, fill-in-the-blank, and personal response). They had to complete them for each Book. Some questions I went over--or warned them the answer was coming up or we had just read it. So, I did a hit-and-miss approah. I collected them along the way and graded them. This approah worked, I think. Most students were able to answer the questions, and spot-checking was helpful. Or, when they read in groups, they could help one another, or I could jump in where needed.
     
  4. KristysRedBarn

    KristysRedBarn Rookie

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    Apr 10, 2008

    We've read a couple of novels this year. I too make up a question sheet for them to fill out each day. The answers are fairly obvious, I just want to verify that they are reading. My students read on their own, then I review with them the next day. So, they have to turn in their assignment sheet before we review. If they are struggling to find an answer I will help them out. They have gotten lazy though and think I should help them find every answer, so now I make them look for a full five minutes before I will help them, that has cut down them asking for help all the time.
     
  5. ChangeAgent

    ChangeAgent Comrade

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    Apr 10, 2008

    I also do nearly-daily-quizzes when we read larger pieces. Even if it's four or five multiple-choice or single-word answers. I use this as a bell-ringer when the students walk in. They know to expect them, and I base it usually off the comprehension questions (whether we did them together or separately). I don't try to trick them, just picking out the major ideas.

    And, for my students, some of those questions may just appear on the test at the end of the unit!
     

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