When teachers leave during their off periods...

Discussion in 'General Education Archives' started by ms_chandler, May 10, 2007.

  1. ms_chandler

    ms_chandler Comrade

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    Does this irritate you? As far as I know, no teachers are supposed to leave. If they do, they're supposed to have their principal's permission and sign out. I have 1st period off, and I see the same teachers leaving to get breakfast, etc. Part of me is upset because I am actually doing work, spending every precious minute I have. The other part of me is upset that they're getting away with it. I have to go to another building for copies, and I'll see some of them driving off or coming back with McDonald's in their hands. I mean, we are getting paid, so how can you justify leaving school grounds and still get paid.

    Our principal is understanding. If you need to run to the bank or something comes up, he'll let you go. However, I haven't missed a day, and I haven't ever left campus. I'm sure many other teachers are like me, and I appreciate that. However, these few teachers tick me off. It's almost like they have a little party every morning. Would this irritate you to know this is going on? Also, I notice they leave before the time they're supposed to. We're supposed to arrive at 7:40 and leave at 3:40. I know for a fact that some of them leave at 3:20, only 5 minutes after dismissal (next to impossible).

    My principal is awesome, and I don't want to seem like a snitch. But, if this bothers me, it's probably bothering other people. To me, it's the same as teachers who have last period off and try to leave right after teaching. You just aren't supposed. No one at my school (that I know of) does that, but I've heard this happens at my friends' schools.
     
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  3. Mr. Windchill

    Mr. Windchill Rookie

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    At our school, there is a binder in the office for teachers to sign in and out if they need to leave during their planning period. One does not specifically need attention from an administrator, although I try to usually catch one and give them a heads up. I'm sure the administration browses through the book to ensure no one is abusing the privilege.

    I am actually a bit surprised, but the binder only asks for name and the times, not where one is going. I have heard of aides leaving to odd places for odd errands such as attending a church auction to buy fudge and stuff, but I am busy enough worrying about my tasks and my kids that I do pretty well not letting the whereabouts of others worry me.
     
  4. Mrs_Goatess

    Mrs_Goatess Comrade

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    I came into a position late this year. Myself and the teacher before had last period planning, and it was common knowledge among the students that the previous teacher would leave immediately after teaching the last class to go do whatever. My school has no sign out system that I know of. I occasionally leave early, but not immediately after the last class. I spend whatever time I need, and, if I find myself simply looking for things to do, I leave. However, I also inherited far too many teacher aids (I had 6, I manage more than well with two now.), a grading system that does require a constant in-out flow (binder checked once a quarter), and if I can beat the end of school traffic (which in high school is *terrible*) by leaving 10-15 mins early, I will. If I had planning any other period, I wouldn't dream of leaving. Last hour though is just too tempting.
     
  5. Jellybean

    Jellybean New Member

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    May 10, 2007

    What's it to ya?

    Trying to be devil's advocate...I would like to ask, "Why do you care?" Does it effect your teaching? Does them leaving the building for 10-20 minutes during the day make it harder on you to do your job? Or, are you worried someone is getting something you can't have?
    Thing is...we all work best in different ways...just like our students. Them leaving the building for 10 minutes shouldn't make a difference on your teaching, but it may make a huge difference to theirs. If a McDonald's run helps them face the dauntless, neverending, and thankless job infront of them...by God let them get their sandwich!

    Here is what really concerns me. Teachers already have enough working against them...students who are unmotivated (usually because they have too much going on at home to be able to focus on school)...parents who are unsuportive and think that since they have a 12th grade education, they are experts on educating...administration who are much more willing to give into political pressure than to stand up for a just cause...newspaper reporters who think that a failing I-step score is better news than any educational accomplishment...
    I could go on, but my point is...with everything that we have against us, we really need to be advocating for each other, instead of being concerned that someone had McDonald's in the middle of their day....My suggestion to you is..."try it sometime!" maybe that McDonald's before noon will help you burn the midnight oil a little longer...as I am sure each of those teachers are doing.
     
  6. ms_chandler

    ms_chandler Comrade

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    I take offense at your reply, Jellybean. Yes, it does affect me because my reputation as a teacher is at stake here. You may think otherwise, or maybe you don't care. I'm not sure since I don't know you.

    Seeing teachers leave campus and walking around with McDonald's bags in the busiest part of down looks down on the school which includes me.

    Sorry, but I care about my reputation as a teacher. We already have enough against us. Now, if a teacher just wants to eat in his/her classroom, that's fine by me. I do that, too. But running errands makes it seem that we don't need a planning period, which DOES affect me.

    Sorry you think otherwise. I guess you didn't get my post.
     
  7. ms.jansen

    ms.jansen Companion

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    May 10, 2007

    If I choose to leave/not work during my planning period, it just means I have to do the work I missed at another time. Unless it is against school policy to leave campus during the school day or you are late getting things done, I don't think there is anything wrong with it. The discussion has happened many times on here about when teachers prefer to get their work done; some people work better before school, some during their prep periods, some right after school, and some at night/at home. Personally, I find that I do not get very much done during my prep periods and that if I go on a short walk to get some fresh air, the rest of my day goes much better and I am more productive in the long run. Leaving early (before the stated time on your contract) is another story, and I agree that it should only happen occasionally with approval.
     
  8. Jellybean

    Jellybean New Member

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    No, It reflect's THEIR reputation. What reflects YOUR reputation is that you have time to concern yourself with their job instead of concentrating on YOURS.
    But, I can agree to disagree : )
    Not sure what Post you are talking about though.
     
  9. ms.jansen

    ms.jansen Companion

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    May 10, 2007

    The previous two posts just showed up after I had written mine. Ms. Chandler, I understand how you think it could reflect negatively on teachers to see them walking around outside all the day. But, most professionals are allowed to leave to get a lunch during their work day, and as long as teachers aren't out shopping at Macy's or something, I think most parents and other adults would just assume that the person was out getting their lunch and would return to school as soon as they were done. I understand that you don't want the public thinking "Oh, teachers must not need those free periods" but I am not sure the McDonald's argument is the same as Macy's, church auctions, etc. Just a thought; trying to see both sides here.
     
  10. ChristyF

    ChristyF Moderator

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    May 10, 2007

    We have a few teachers who head for the hills during their planning perios. My reaction is mixed. I understand that it should be our right to spend that time as we wish, but on the other hand...how in the world do they find the time??? My 50 minute planning period (my kids' specials time) is spent on make-ups, remediation, making copies, calling parents, typing tests, study guides, worksheets, the list goes on and on. We even had one who drove 30+ minutes to WalMart (the school was buying her a dvd player - some people just live right).
     
  11. MissFrizzle

    MissFrizzle Virtuoso

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    I don't care if other people leave. Quite honestly, life happens. How do you know someone had a sick child to tend to in the morning, and needs some quiet time. Or someone is dealing with some poor heatlh news. I say, it's your prep. Do what you need to do. Teachers are adults, if they choose to leave, they are responsible enough to do their work at another time. It's no one's business. It really bothers me that a colleague would keep tabs on me. That's irritating.
     
  12. Research_Parent

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    May 10, 2007

    Here's my 2 cents...

    Yes, it bugs me that someone else, someone who dares to call themselves a TEACHER, believes its okay to S-T-R-E-T-C-H school policy simply to go get a breakfast sandwich from McDonalds. But not all school policies are created equal...

    Also, the thing is I have so much to do, I can't remember who all overhears my comments...Hey, you didn't ask me if I wanted anything from McDonalds before you left this morning...(the bright side here is if its a negative, then it will be taken care of and if its truly taboo, otherwise at least the next time they leave, they'll ask you if you want something too)
     
  13. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    May 11, 2007

    I think the reason for the rule is twofold: one, they want people in the building in case of a crisis of some sort. (anything from a power outage to a lockdown.) two, they're concerned that people won't get back in time to cover their classes.

    You never know what is going on behind the scenes. Perhaps their end of the year review will include a mention of this, especially if your principal is as good as you say. Perhaps not. Perhaps one of these days it will all come to a head when someone doesn't get back in time and misses a class.

    But I wouldn't sweat it. Hit Dunkin Donuts on the way to work and treat yourself within the parameters of the rules. Know that what comes around goes around: your principal is aware that you are one of the ones he can count on if he needs you.
     
  14. MsWK

    MsWK Habitué

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    May 11, 2007

    Nope, it doesn't irritate me at all. I encourage my teachers to leave during their planning time--take their meetings outside, have meetings over lunch, go get books from the library, pick up materials you need for your lessons, etc. It's only a problem when you're not back where you need to be when you need to be.

    If they go pick up 20 library books, get photos printed at CVS, check out a new exhibit where we might take the children, and happen to pick up a Starbucks latte on the way back, so be it... as long as they've done their job, and are back when they need to be with the children. Not all planning happens in the classroom.
     
  15. La Profesora

    La Profesora Cohort

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    I am also annoyed by teachers who leave. Some people think "It doesn't affect YOU what they do," but it does! It affects my moral. When you act as a professional, and are there at the school working your butt off, seeing other teachers eating McDonalds that they left their jobs to go get, talking on their cell phones, or generally screwing around - it affects ME. From 8 to 4 we are all paid the same paycheck, but some teachers make it look like a joke that I'm doing my job!

    Its a safety issue! If there are supposed to be 100 responsible adults on this campus, and 20 are goofing around or have left - it affects ME.

    If I have to go let 30 kids into a teachers class because she's late getting back from her conference - and then they do something bad while unsupervised, it affects ME. If I rat her out for being late, then I'm the troublemaker - and that affects ME TOO!

    This was a great thread to start, ms chandler! Encourage teachers to bring the professionalism back to the profession! Then people in the community won't whine, "Why should they get paid over the summer and so much free time (and obviously, plenty of time to eat their breakfasts) and their job is so easy!"

    If you make our jobs look like a joke, people will treat teachers like a JOKE!!!

    Amen girl!
     
  16. booklover

    booklover Rookie

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    May 11, 2007

    I had other jobs before I was a teacher. Teaching is definitely the most demanding job. I think people expect teachers to be higher beings, constant workers and martyrs.
    We are not martyrs. We are adults who can be trusted. In every other job I have worked, you had off time and were encouraged to socialize, slow down and enjoy for a part of each day. I work a full day, get to school early and give my all to the kids. I supervise lunch and stay a few minutes after school for quick tutoring. If I ever needed a few minutes to myself, I feel that I could take them and would never feel guilty.
    We do a good job, and we don't have to answer to anyone. There will always be rule abusers, but for the most part, I think people in the teaching profession are already catering to a higher calling. In my last job my department head encouraged us to "come out of our caves" (offices), to begin conversations with other teachers, discuss books, eat lunch.
    Those breaks made me a better, more focused teacher. It made me appreciate my co-workers as humans. It made me see the students as more than just workers.
    My take is: become more than a drone; teachers live every day, all the time as teachers. Enjoy the great career we've chosen.
     
  17. La Profesora

    La Profesora Cohort

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    I agree with collaborating with your peers. What I think is wrong is teachers wasting time doing other things not related to work. If I saw a teacher at the mall or at a restaurant during what was supposed to be their workday, I would question their integrity. Why is this teacher being paid to go to the mall or the post office or to talk on the phone?

    I am all for collaboration, reaching out to fellow teachers, discussing books and articles, and making the workplace a better environment. I am against "slackers."
     
  18. Tasha

    Tasha Phenom

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    May 11, 2007

    Most schools around here just ask that you sign out and be back before your kids are. I think it is fine. Most teachers run out to get snack because the parents forgot to send one or to get valentine cards for the 3 that didn't bring any. Sometimes they pick up lunch. We have a 25 minute lunch during which we actually have 15 minutes to eat. Most professional jobs have an hour, during which you can leave and have lunch somewhere. Being able to get out of the building can really lift your spirits. Also, for most jobs OSHA states that for every 4 hours you get a 15 min. break to do what you please (this is usually a 30min-1hr lunch break). You do not have to stay on the premises, or do anything work related. Teachers don't really have that break, and we work more than 8 hours a day most of the time.

    On the other hand, it is wrong to ignore school policy. That would irritate me too, you follow the rules of the school you signed up for. If that means no leaving, you don't leave. As far as the safety issue, if you don't have kids in your class, someone else does. They are responsible for the kids. You should not be considered part of any staff:student ratios unless you have kids in your class at that time.
     
  19. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Virtuoso

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    May 11, 2007

    Doesn't matter to me if they leave or not. That's between them and the administration.

    I don't usually leave, but I don't feel bad when I do. For one thing I don't do it often. For another, I'm always one of the first ones here and the last ones to leave. I'm always here a good 30 minutes or more before and after the time we have to be here. A couple of weeks ago we'd all had a stressful day, so two of us went to a nearby restaurant and brought back milkshakes for all the teachers on our team.
     
  20. MissBee06

    MissBee06 Rookie

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    My school does not have a policy about teachers leaving. I have a 45 minute lunch break and a 45 minute planning time. Our admin does not see a problem with teachers leaving during that time as long as we are back in time for our class. I don't go out every day, but there are days when I have to go out. Sometimes I need to go to the store to get something for the afternoon. Just a couple of days ago I had to go out during my planning time. That day when it was my lunch break, I had an unplanned conference that lasted the whole 45 minutes. When it was my planning time, the principal made sure that I went and got some lunch.

    At my school it is just not a big deal if you leave. Most of us are here early in the morning, stay late in the evening, and I'm up here most weekends. So I don't feel bad about leaving at all.
     
  21. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    May 11, 2007

    We are adults in the working world. If there is no school policy against it, we can do whatever we want. I don't know anyone in any other field who can't use their lunch hour for shopping or looking at the ocean or anything they want to do.

    My school just wants us to let the office know so we can be contacted in case of an emergency or outside call. We also sometimes have two periods off in a row (due to the kids having so many specials). In the beginning and middle of the year I am completely busy in all my plans, but at the end of the year, I am chomping at the bit to get out. If I don't have to tutor after school and have a plan last period, I sometimes ask someone to cover my dismissal (sitting at a table) so I can leave at 2pm. It is a heavenly break.

    I couldn't care less what other teachers do with their plans.
     
  22. bonneb

    bonneb Fanatic

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    Haha! I just popped on here with my McDonald's lunch bag in my hand!!

    No, I don't give a flip what other teachers do with break times - that what they are called at my school and we are free to use them as needed. The only thing that would bother me is if a teacher comes back late or leaves early and it puts more work on ME, which happens.

    I also went to pick up a prescription just now. I have chronic back pain, and that prescription will help me get through the rest of the day with my pain controlled. The pharmacy is closed when I get to go off work. I have used my lunch break to run home and check on a sick kid, or pick up paperwork I forgot to bring back. I have used my break to make phone calls I can't make after school. I have used my break to sit in the teachers' lounge with my eyes closed and an ice pack on my head due to a migraine. Why should I have to justify this to anyone else?

    I don't mean to sound grouchy -- but geeze guys! As long as you are doing your job, and others are not infringing on you by shoving their responsibilities off on you while they play, what is the deal? I figure, they are adults. They will do the work during a "prep" period or at 10:00 at night, whatever works best for them. I sometimes leave the campus during a break, but my work gets done. I am often here till 6 or 7 at night. Let people be responsible for themselves, and actually it is the principal's job to take care of it if it is a problem.
     
  23. love2teach

    love2teach Enthusiast

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    May 11, 2007

    I never leave for prep....and lunch...its a rare thing..only because I usually dont have the time....but somedays I get an hr...and if I have run out to get lunch....

    ms. chandler....if you worked in an office, would you always stay in the office for lunch and your breaks?

    I used to take walks during lunch when I student taught....so great to get outside for a little while.....
    And there are days when I spend my prep w the door closed and the lights off....ahhhhh calm and quite!
     
  24. loves2teach

    loves2teach Enthusiast

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    Nope, it doesn't bother me...

    My school is laid back though, and will help people out if they need to go and do something (ex. I had my bank account hacked, and had to go to the bank to work things out). My principal had an aide cover my class.
     
  25. ms_chandler

    ms_chandler Comrade

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    I've never worked in an office (boring for me), but I've worked in sales. We were not allowed to leave for breaks, just for lunch. Planning periods are not the same as breaks... it is a sort of down-time, but it's meant for lesson plans, calling parents, grading papers, etc. Also, we don't leave for lunch because every teacher has lunch duty, so to speak. We have 3 diff. lunch periods, and the teachers sit together and monitor their classes, who each sit at certain tables.

    So, there's your answer. If I worked in another job, I would take my required lunch break and leave sometimes. But, that's not the case.
     
  26. ms_chandler

    ms_chandler Comrade

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    THANKS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I'm glad we are true professionals!!! :)
     
  27. bonneb

    bonneb Fanatic

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    It seems to depend on what the rules are at the particular school. If teachers are sneaking out when it is against the rules to leave campus, they are breaking the rules. It is the administrator's job to take care of that.

    If there is no restriction on leaving campus during a break or prep time, why would it bother me for others to do so? I try really really hard to meet all of my responsibilities. I am where I am supposed to be when I am supposed to be. I expect that from the adults I work with and for the most part they come through. But it is definitely not my job to oversee what others are doing - there is someone hired to do that. If they are messing off, it will come to light sooner or later and I can hold my head up because I didn't meddle in stuff that was not my business.
     
  28. ms_chandler

    ms_chandler Comrade

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    '


    Leaving campus can lift some people's spirits, I agree. But, I love my job and I don't really need my spirits... LOL

    Also, I think these teachers may be sneaking out. I know that they're definitely not signing out because the signout sheet is by my classroom, and I never see them walk to it. My door stays open, and I definitely see when people pass by because of where my desk is at. I am not spying, though!!!
     
  29. bonneb

    bonneb Fanatic

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    La Professora - I agree - if it is against the rules, or if others are shoving off their responsibilities and you have to pick up the slack, that is not right. If they are neglecting their jobs and infringing on you, that is a time to go to the principal. But, if there is no restriction against leaving campus, how is it unprofessional to do so? When people see me in the community during the school day, a few times a parent has said,"Where is your class??" as if I would just leave my class and run out to get crackers! I just smile and say, "They are well supervised by _________________ right now and I will be sure to be back to supervise them when ________'s time with them is over :)"

    I don't understand - is the issue 1) they are breaking the rule and sneaking off campus, 2) they are putting their responsibilities off on someone else, or 3) that there is jealousy because apparently some teachers can do it all - go get McDonald's during a break and still get all their work done? I am not trying to be snide, I really want to know what is the true issue. I work with someone who gets in a snit over silly things lots of time, like why is this certain parent spending so much time in 3rd grade and not helping me out when I have her kid, or why is the principal spending so much time in _________'s room when I could use him in here, or how come the secretary does such and such for so and so , but not for me.
     
  30. MissFrizzle

    MissFrizzle Virtuoso

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    May 11, 2007

    Thank you Bonneb
     
  31. ms_chandler

    ms_chandler Comrade

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    1.) is the issue............ No, I am farrrrrrrrrr from jealous. I got a better eval. than both of them. I was told I had the highest score in my dept., except for the dept. head!

    But, telling the principal would be tattling, right? I mean, this is almost like teachers skipping school.
     
  32. Miss W

    Miss W Phenom

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    I hardly ever leave the school during the day, but don't feel bad if I need to. I only leave if it's to pick up lunch, or if I need to get something for my classroom. If I need to leave I sign-out at the office, tell the secretary, and my neighboring teacher. I tell the teacher next door just in case, for some reason, I don't get back in time. This has never happened, but we're more than willing to help each other out. We get each others kids from recess so both of us don't have to go out to the playground. We've covered for each other at dismissal time when we had an appointment or funeral (of course approved by the principal).

    I started reading this and thought "Oh no! I have to go to the DMV Monday to get my drivers license." Will that be bad to go during my lunch time? I keep trying to go after school, but I can't get out of the parking lot in time, or if I do their ID maker has not been working. I of course will ask my principal first if is okay, and then ask my fellow teacher if she wouldn't mind (just in case).
     
  33. MissFrizzle

    MissFrizzle Virtuoso

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    So, you say you get better evals, you love your job so much you don't need to step away for a minute... everything is just peachy for you. Why police all your colleagues? You are not the principal. I bet he already knows.
     
  34. ms_chandler

    ms_chandler Comrade

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    ME AGAIN!!!!!!!

    Actually, two teachers (not in my dept.) that leave "illegally" covered up for each other. Once, a parent showed up for a conference, and they paged for one. He'd gone to get breakfast, so the other one went to the office. She said that the teacher was somewhere else on campus. She was able to handle the situation, and the other teacher came back with breakfast....... No worries, right?
     
  35. ms_chandler

    ms_chandler Comrade

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    Gosh.... This is a FORUM to discuss and vent. This is not a newspaper or something....... But, when I am a principal, I will already be trained! :rolleyes:
     
  36. MissFrizzle

    MissFrizzle Virtuoso

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    Well, you are right about that one. you will have had lots of experience by then. You are just way too harsh for saying that those teachers ( who legally) do what they need to on their break are poor teachers. That's a sterotype and that doesn't make you any better than someone else.
     
  37. ms_chandler

    ms_chandler Comrade

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    May 11, 2007

    Who said legally? They are sneaking out............ Gosh, I think this discussion is over. Thanks to those who understand. If this behavior is accepted at your school, that's fine. The point is they're BREAKING RULES!!!!!!!!!!!!!! What kind of a teacher/role model is that?
     
  38. Kerfuffle

    Kerfuffle Rookie

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    May 11, 2007

    Ms. Chandler, I'm just curious if, after this lively discussion, you plan to talk to your principal about this?

    As for my two cents (as a fairly new sub, not a teacher yet), the school environment is pretty restrictive/regimented compared to other "professional" workplaces I've been in. There's a rigid schedule enforced by bells, extra duties & meetings, limited opportunities to use the restroom, short lunches, and the need to be "on" hour after hour. As a future teacher I think I would prefer a relatively free prep period; that kind of trust would make me feel more professional, not less. (Unfinished work will come home anyway, as others have mentioned.)

    But I'm with you on one thing for sure -- policy is policy, and it stinks to see others getting away with breaking rules while you're trying to do the right thing! I hope you find a way to ease your irritation.

    Edit: I was writing this while Ms. Chandler said the discussion was over. Didn't mean to step on toes, beat a dead horse, etc.!
     
  39. bonneb

    bonneb Fanatic

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    May 11, 2007

    Ms. Chandler - regarding the issue of "tattling" - this is only my opinion. If the teachers are breaking a rule that does not affect you directly, I would leave it to the principal to do his job and figure it out. If you are having to pick up their slack because they aren't on time to supervise their own kids or do their assigned duties, then I don't think it is tattling to talk to the principal. It would be best to talk directly to the teacher - "When you leave campus against the rules, and are late getting back, I have been covering your kids for the sake of their safety, but I feel unhappy about having to cover for you." But, some teachers would not take this well and nothing good would come out of it - I work with one of these! - so I have to go to the principal when her irresponsible behavior affects me or my kids.

    Since it is against the rules at your school, I reallyl understand why it would be irritating. It would irritate me if someone was breaking a staff rule. But unless it involves a safety issue, or putting extra duties on you, I would let the principal discover it and try to not let it get to you. People who break the rules for staff do get caught, and the principal should be doing his job. For you to have to report this really means you are having to do HIS job too, and he might not like hearing that, you know? Awkward.

    Please don't take the comments as a personal attack. It seems each school has different rules. Some of us were responding to you thinking the rules were the same for you as for us in our more relaxed setting. It would be a real shame if we stopped talking and discussing when we don't agree! To me, that is the joy of this forum - we can share and discuss even when we don't agree. That gives us the chance to learn from each other. We can learn new things or points of view and still not agree. But please don't muzzle yourself - I want to know your thinking!!!
     
  40. ms_chandler

    ms_chandler Comrade

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    May 11, 2007

    KERFUFFLE AND BONNEB:

    I didn't want to seem rude by not replying. I do plan to talk to my principal if it infringes on me again. Let me explain how:

    Sometimes, subs don't show up. Since this is the end of the year, more teachers are calling in, which means more subs who sometimes don't show up. Since I have 1st pd. off, and my classroom is right by the office, they will stop and ask me if I can cover until the sub comes. They try to make it even so that other teachers cover, too. Of course, only a certain amount have 1st pd. off. When other teachers cannot be found easier, I have to pick up the slack. Since I'm readily available, it hurts me. My principal has apologized time and time again. Also, when I fill in on these classes, I actually teach them like the teacher has instructed the sub to do. When I relieved another "breakfast" teacher recently, she had the kids talking. No sub was coming in, so the principal had "breakfast" teacher take the first 45 mins of her planning and I would relieve her halfway. When I came to relieve her, she said what they were working on, but they were talking. Actually, this teacher was in the hallway talking to another teacher at the time that I came to relieve her. But, I wanted to stick to what I had agreed to with my principal, so I went in and taught.

    So, if in these last 8 days, a sub doesn't show up, and I'm called, I'll politely bring this matter up....... because IT DOES AFFECT ME. However, I might just ask him casually if teachers are allowed to leave often. As my mentor told me at the beginning of the year (and as I explained in my original post), my principal is okay with it if we have an occasional errand to tend to. But, a planning period is not for LEAVING to pick up breakfast. Of course, I sip on my Starbucks and eat my muffin during my planning period, but I'm not wasting school time to get it. I leave my house earlier so I can get it before school, like a responsible person should.
     
  41. La Profesora

    La Profesora Cohort

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    May 11, 2007

    Please don't attack guys!

    If you are allowed to leave on your planning period to run to the bank or McDonalds, that is your right. To me, it seems like you should take care of your personal business before school, and grade or make parent contact while you are on the clock.

    At our school, you have to ask, sign out, then sign back in. I know that this rule is broken by my next door neighbor teacher, because she is SO CONSISTENTLY late that she as designated a kid to walk through my room to open her door. THAT BUGS ME! I have told the principal, and if they take care of the issue, its their issue. I have reported it, so the first time there is a fight or some kid does drugs in her class while she is out taking care of her personal business - I'm not responsible.

    Am I jealous of her ability to take advantage of the education system and screw her students in the process? Absolutely not. There is only one person who judges in the end... and we all know who that is. I've taken care of my karma.

    I believe that as a public servant, and as a teacher of children, making sure that teachers are seen positively and doing the right things are up to ALL of us. We are all professionals, and should act that way whether we are CAUGHT or not, and whether someone is LOOKING or not.
     

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