When life got in the way of teaching...

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Starivy, Jul 7, 2011.

  1. Starivy

    Starivy Companion

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    Jul 7, 2011

    For the first time in my life, LIFE got in the way this past year and I was not able to secure a full time teaching position. I could blame it on the economy, 2 deaths in my family, emotional distress, burnout, medical complications, which are all real and legitimate but I allowed myself to crumble under the pressure and did not have to the tools to get past it all at the time. I was blessed to be able to stay home and pick up the pieces of my life/get help...things have calmed down tremendously and I need to get a teaching job to help pay the bills and get back out there working with kids!! How do I explain this gap in employment to a new principal? I have always went to interviews with every t crossed and i dotted with guns a'blazing but now with this "blemish" I feel I have a starlet letter. I feel like this:dizzy: when I think about it! But I really know I would and could do a great job once I get back in. Thanks for any advice! I wish I were strong like so many of you going through so much while teaching...hopefully the next years are more stable for me. :thumb:
     
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  3. callmebob

    callmebob Enthusiast

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    Jul 7, 2011

    You don't have to go into the details, there are many teachers who have a gap in their teaching due to the economy right now.
     
  4. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Jul 7, 2011

    Please don't beat yourself up.

    There's no way to judge "strong." Life hits different people differently at different points in their lives. It's not a contest-- anyone who comes out the other side of hardship more or less whole has been strong enough to get through.

    It's easy to second guess what other's reactions could have been or should have been. But until someone has walked that mile in your footsteps, they're simply not qualified to say.

    Now, on to practical matters: I can understand how you might not want to explain all that on a resume or cover letter.

    You could go several different ways. You could focus on those medical complications, or talk about how you needed the time away to care for those loved ones you lost. Or you could focus on the economy.

    The odds are that anyone in a position to conduct interviews would know someone in their own lives who shared each of those experiences.

    My sympathies on your losses, and prayers for your continued physical and emotional good health.
     

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