When do you sacrifice

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by mstemple05, Aug 22, 2007.

  1. mstemple05

    mstemple05 Cohort

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2007
    Messages:
    675
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 22, 2007

    the job you want (that doesn't pay well) for a job you really don't want that pays the bills? and do you take the job you really want even if it doesn't pay well? just so you won't have to leave the field of education (or the level you desire) because it pays more?

    i guess the question i'm tryna get out is, when is money more important than what you wanna do?
     
  2.  
  3. Malcolm

    Malcolm Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2005
    Messages:
    2,100
    Likes Received:
    3

    Aug 22, 2007

    My advice is follow your passion.

    That said, sometimes we have to settle for less just to survive.
     
  4. Tbug

    Tbug Companion

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2002
    Messages:
    148
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 22, 2007

    I really think it depends on your lifestyle. If you can do what you want to do and be comfortable, go for it. Comfortable means different things for different people. You may be able to go without things for a period of time if it means you are overall happier.
    I hate making adult decision! Sometimes they are so hard!
     
  5. Bitsy Griffin

    Bitsy Griffin Companion

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2005
    Messages:
    204
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 22, 2007

    I took a job once for the money and I was miserable. The money was nice, but I hated the job. I ended up going back to a job for less money that I really enjoyed. BUT you have to be able to live on what you make.
     
  6. cmw

    cmw Groupie

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2007
    Messages:
    1,241
    Likes Received:
    2

    Aug 22, 2007

    Money isn't everything! I know it's a cliche but it's true :D It all depends where you are in life too. I have taken a job just to be able to teach and had a looonnggg year. I have also worked other PT jobs to make ends meet. In the end you have to do what makes you happy. :D
     
  7. Windy City

    Windy City Companion

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2007
    Messages:
    131
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 22, 2007

    We went from making a combined income of nearly $80,000 in an area where homes go for $150,000 to moving to an area where we made a combined income of $35,000 where homes go for $600,000 (we rent!). We moved because we didn't like our jobs and there were no promising prospects for other careers.

    The two years we spent living with a very small income in a high cost of living area were very, very difficult. But we didn't dwell on it. We had hamburgers instead of steak. We never ate out. New clothes? Ha!

    We did this to follow our dreams, and we haven't looked back. We both LOVE our jobs (my husband's job is something that sports nuts envy beyond belief), and through moving up in our various careers, we will soon be back at a significantly larger income.
     
  8. jen12

    jen12 Devotee

    Joined:
    May 8, 2007
    Messages:
    1,010
    Likes Received:
    5

    Aug 23, 2007

    My grandparents grew up in the Depression and always had the philosophy that you work because you have to. The idea of doing something you enjoy was just ridiculous. They passed that ethic on to my mother, who raised me and my brother on her own after my father bailed. She also spent years (and is still working) at a job she doesn't necessarily enjoy because her main goal was to pay the bills.

    So I grew up knowing that I'd work in an office. Not because that was a choice. It was just what people do. And I've always hated it. Now, at 35 I'm applying to credential programs and taking all the money that I've saved over the years to quit work and go to school full time in pursuit of a career change. My mom is terrified at the prospect of me not working for a year. I feel I've earned it. And it's hard to talk to her about when I know she disapproves and thinks I'm being irresponsible.

    I guess my answer to your post is that sometimes you have to compromise. And it sucks. But if you keep your eye on the ball and always remember what is important to you, you can follow your passion eventually.
     
  9. mommy3boys

    mommy3boys Companion

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2007
    Messages:
    157
    Likes Received:
    1

    Aug 23, 2007

    Jen12, I can relate. My parents think the same as your mom, you work because you have to and don't have to like it. I got a degree in business and worked 3/4 time all through college so I could "make more money". My ex-husband was only supportive as long as I made "more money" and did not understand the long hours came with the bigger paycheck. Now I'm also 35, single parent and finally have decided to go for it. I've passed some of my test (CBEST, CSET) and will be taking prereqs in the fall and hopefully will be able to apply to the program in the spring. I was killing myself working long hours in a job I hated and I did it for a while but now I'm going to work long hours doing a job I love and still be able to support my family.

    You need to decide what is important for you, if you have to take a step back to pay the bills then that's what you have to do. But at some point you should follow your Bliss or you will be one bitter and unhappy person later in life.

    I asked to be laid off and am using my savings, financial aid and subbing to pursue my dream job.
     
  10. Mldouglas

    Mldouglas Comrade

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2003
    Messages:
    365
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 23, 2007

    I say go with your heart!!

    I have been out of school for several years without a full time teaching job. I have done a variety of things. I went back to school to get more course work completed in the areas of reading and math. Then I subbed for four and a half years while I worked evenings in at a gas station. I then relocated to a larger metropolitan area trying to get a job. I subbed for a year and did not like the school district and was severely burned out on subbing so I quit subbing for two and a half years to work at a daycare center. It was the biggest mistake of my career. I was overworked and severely underpaid. It was an absolute nightmare! I didn't have anything against the kids I just kept getting shifted from one room to another and I ended up in a room for three year olds. At that time I realized I had to get the **** out of there. Then I returned to subbing for three different districts. I am now very happy even though I currently work three jobs. I work almost everyday as a substitute, I work a few nights a week as a tutor at Sylvan Learning Center and I have a third job that I mostly work on Fridays and Saturdays but I can up my hours during breaks in the school calendar. I make enough money to pay all of my bills and have a little left over for emergencies.


    Mldouglas
     
  11. mstemple05

    mstemple05 Cohort

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2007
    Messages:
    675
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 23, 2007

    i really appreciate everyone's messages. i have been on several interviews for the job i dream of (teaching elementary integrating spanish) and mostly all of them have offered the position right there at the interview. they also mostly only offer between 10 and 15k less than what i am used to making. i know private schools don't pay a WHOLE LOT but i do wanna be comfortable. however i have decided that even with such a huge pay cut the bills CAN be made, it's just a matter of the extra $ i can or cannot bring home. but as you all have said, there are part-time jobs, after school programs etc.

    my grandfather is among the "you work to pay the bills" type. he used to tell me something was better than nothing in terms of working vs not working. but when i told him i was looking for another job because where i had been working at was highly unorganized and it's not really what i WANT to do his response was "so what? what do you care? as long as you get a paycheck every week, right?" and i couldn't tell my pop-pop "no, it's more than that." so i said "yes" to appease him, but i realized he just would never understand. he's a septa (our major transportation system) bus driver and just picks up passengers and drops them off, doesn't have to deal w/ people or socialize. and as long as the bills are paid and he has nice things at home and can get away, i guess to him your work environment doesn't have to be as pleasant and comfortable as your home. that's what home is for. my grandmother however, has been a program director for a juvenile center's SCOH program and HATED it. and would ALWAYS come home frantic and pissed off and share that sometimes money isn't everything. and it's not worth the headaches and stress. she suffered quite a few illnesses and dr's visits as a result. i just wanna be happy and educate. i'm not tryna get rich, you can't in this field. my heart is in it, but i guess it's not for everyone to understand.

    but thanks guys.
     
  12. jazzer

    jazzer Guest

    Aug 23, 2007

    I started my own education business

    I have been teaching for 8 years. I have always loved the students and the subjects I taught, but was occasionally very stressed by the idea of working for someone, having someone looking over your shoulder all the time. etc.

    I discovered my happiness when I found a way to teach through my own business. I hooked up with Kindermusik, which is an international organization which trains people to teach primary music concepts to very young child ages 0-7. There was very little start up costs because the organization is not a franchise.

    Also being a band director, I decided to contact small private schools which did not have band programs, and come in and teach band. the parents pay for the lessons, the schools pay nothing.

    I am just starting this fall, but know I can be successful at it.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

Total: 331 (members: 1, guests: 313, robots: 17)
test