When do you have your IEP meetings?

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by AZSped, Jul 7, 2009.

  1. AZSped

    AZSped New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2009
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 7, 2009

    hello I'm a new sped student working on my masters and certification. I'm hoping to teach at the elementary level in a self contained room. My degree will be in Sped severe/profound. So when do you have your IEP meetings? During school or after school? Also is it very hard keeping up with the IEP paperwork? Do you do a lot of the paperwork at home? Are you allowed to use the software on your own personal computer? I'm trying to get as much info as possible. Also, what is the best place to observe, sped has so many different areas, inclusion, resource, self contained? Any ideas? Also is it better to teach at the elementary, middle, or highschool level? Any thoughts on that? Thanks.
     
  2.  
  3. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

    Joined:
    May 19, 2007
    Messages:
    6,757
    Likes Received:
    1,718

    Jul 7, 2009

    I have a self contained mild/severe class. I hold my IEP meetings during the day because that is the only time all the staff members who need to attend can. The IEP paperwork can be overwhelming but the key is to stay caught up. If you get behind on paperwork, you may miss important dates and be open to federal penalties. I do all of my planning at home and come in early to do the IEP paperwork because the program is on the district server. The software can't be installed on my home computer. Of course, I am biased, but elementary is the place I am happiest because I get to influence a child from the get go and maybe make a difference in the child's whole school career. I would try to observe in each scenario you have mentioned. Check with schools in your area. I know I gladly bring anyone in to observe. In my room, they become working observers. Good luck with your decision. Keep us posted.
     
  4. teachsph2008

    teachsph2008 Companion

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2008
    Messages:
    230
    Likes Received:
    10

    Jul 7, 2009

    At my current school, IEPs are usually scheduled an hour before school ends (for the students). But I have had them in the morning.

    It's hard when you don't have a routine. You may sometimes have to work after hours to make sure it's all done. And I must admit, it can be overwhelming at times. Some of the documents seems useless.

    Of course it's not required to do at home, but sometimes I'd rather be at home than staying in my class to get it done.

    First job could be only be done at school. Now I'm lucky to have a web based program.

    I'm with Becky, try to observe in as many classes as you can. I've worked many different grade levels, but have only taught the upper grades. One thing to remember about SPH is that it can be very physically demanding. In HS, you may be required to lift/assist adults.

    Good luck!!
     
  5. Proud2BATeacher

    Proud2BATeacher Phenom

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2005
    Messages:
    4,896
    Likes Received:
    5

    Jul 7, 2009

    I presently work in a site school for students with severe behaviors and we book off 1.5 days for IEP meetings. At my last school I held them before school, during school hours and after school -- dependent on parent's schedules.

    The hard part of keeping up with IEP paperwork is the fact that it can be time consuming and for the most part has to be down before or after school. At my present school and my last school, I am with my students from the time they arrive in the morning until they go home -- I have no preps. I make sure I have DEAR time (Drop Everything And Read) in my schedule for me to do some quick paperwork or prep -- I start of the year with about 15 minutes and by the end of the year we have 30 minutes of DEAR time.

    I do paperwork that can be done at home at home.

    I do my IEPs mostly at home. We just signed a confidentiality form to be able to work with it at home. We are only allowed to work on them at home or at school -- not Starbucks, etc... I would rather sit comfortably on my couch and do my work and plus it is easy to be caught up the distractions of visiting other teachers after school.

    I would observe (volunteer) as many different special education settings as you can. Not only would it look great on your resume but you can get reference letters from the teachers of the classes that you observed/volunteered in. I was unlucky and was placed in a regular ed. class with a few students working below grade level for my special ed. practicum. It didn't prepare me for teaching special education at all.
     
  6. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2005
    Messages:
    4,376
    Likes Received:
    809

    Jul 7, 2009

    Our IEPs have to be done during the school day because that is the only time the professional staff members (school psychologist, speech therapist, occupational therapist, and school social worker) are available. Our district will not pay them overtime, so we have to make sure we schedule our meetings early enough in the day so we can finish the meeting by the time school is over. Since IEP meetings often go over 2 hours, that means nothing can be scheduled after 1pm. It doesn't matter what the parents schedule is -- they either have to get there, or choose not to be a part of it. I guess since most of these professionals are split between 2 or 3 schools, the district had to do something to deal with the scheduling issue.

    Our IEP software can only be accessed in school -- you can't get it from home, so you have to do that at school.

    I'm not a spec teacher, I"m a general ed teacher who does autisitic inclusion, but I used to do regular ed inclusion. The thing I hated was, if you did inclusion you could end up out of the classroom for 2-3 hours every single week just going to IEP meetings! The subs were often not subs -- but staff members (since it wasn't a half day or a full day) so they weren't teachers, and they certainly aren't trained to work with special needs students. So when you did get back, your class was usually "in trouble" and all you could really leave was busy work. It was so frustrating. It was already hard enough to keep pace with the non-inclusion class (we have a city-wide pacing guide, and we are all required to keep up with it no matter what.) This just made it all the harder.

    And they wondered why general ed teachers groaned when they heard they were assigned to do inclusion that year! It means you will be highly stressed, always behind, having to come in early, leave late, and miss most of your planning periods.
     
  7. Gimet

    Gimet Rookie

    Joined:
    May 23, 2009
    Messages:
    56
    Likes Received:
    3

    Jul 9, 2009

    We schedule all IEP meetings after school, during our common prep period.

    We have a web based IEP program, so I usually start IEPs at home, print, edit and print at school.

    I have taught high school sped (resource counceling model) and am currently teaching Early Childhood Special Education (fully self-contained). I prefer working with the little ones.

    If you can observe/ participate/ volunteer in some different situations, I'm sure it would be helpful for you.

    Smiles and Good Luck!
     
  8. AZSped

    AZSped New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2009
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 9, 2009

    Thanks for your responses guys, I'm really excited to start going to school. Can anyone recommend and good books for me to read to get an idea of what I'm getting into? I'm going to be working with the severe/profound population.
     
  9. Emily Bronte

    Emily Bronte Groupie

    Joined:
    May 28, 2006
    Messages:
    1,265
    Likes Received:
    11

    Jul 10, 2009

    I teach in a self-contained setting, or federal IV. I try my hardest to schedule IEP meetings during the school day or during student contact time. I had a hard time doing that this year because of parent conflicts with work. My duty day is 7:30-3:30. I had a couple of parents who could not get to school before 3:00, although employers should be allowing them to leave work for school functions. Since IEPs generally take 1.5-2 hours, I was at school beyond my contracted time. I was then able to leave early on a Friday or two. But, after this year, I have said to myself that I am going to really put my foot down and just say that Meetings will be scheduled no later than 1:30. Doctors do not stay late to fit our schedule....Plus by scheduling during the school day, your related services professionals can be there-Speech, OT. Observe and see what you would like. This year I am teaching 10-12 graders and I am really excited about it. I did middle school this year and wasn't so much feeling the love...everyone has his or her comfort zone.
     
  10. rchlkay

    rchlkay Companion

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2006
    Messages:
    237
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 12, 2009

    I teach 7-8 sp ed. Observe and work in all age groups, all ability levels that you can because what you think you want may change after a little time with another group of kids. I try to schedule my IEP meeting before or during school. (My official day starts at 7:15. I've had parents come in before this and I've made it work.) My school basically lets me schedule the meetings and then I let the admin know that "Sally is coming in a 1:30, i need a sub for the following teachers for this meeting..." I know this only works because I'm in a small district. But, that's my experience.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

Total: 204 (members: 3, guests: 173, robots: 28)
test