When do you give up?

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by girlblue16, Jun 29, 2008.

  1. girlblue16

    girlblue16 Rookie

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    So, I've been a para for the past two years. Have a degree in Elem. Ed and a CO teaching certificate. Have been on many interviews (they're my downfall for sure!!) and am at the point where I'm thinking 'do I even want to teach? is it worth it?'

    Anyone so tired of interviewing and nothing happening that they are looking in a different field?

    A friend of mine said maybe the way I'm conveying myself in the interview shows that I am not really interested in teaching. I don't have that 'rah rah' cheerleader personality, but I can teach. I was a long term sub for 3 months. The hardest was classroom management. But I did it. I've worked in preschools for 2 yrs. I can't get the job bc I dont have much public school elementary teaching experience, but at the same time, no one is giving me the chance to get the experience.

    It's very frustrating to still be a para after this long.

    My friend may be right...I dont know if I definitely want to teach, but at this point, what does it matter if I can't get the job?!?!?!

    Sorry for the rambling but...it's summer, I'm off work, should be enjoying it, but I'm ALWAYS looking for jobs :(
     
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  3. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    I don't know where you teach but could you ask a principal at the school where you LTSubbed for a 'mock interview'...tell him//her you want to improve your interviewing skills and that you want feedback on your interview, cover letter, resume....

    If money isn't a problem I'd give up the aide stuff and sub...gives you more of the kind of experience schools are looking for...too long in PreK doesn't translate well to elementary unless you are looking for only K jobs...
     
  4. girlblue16

    girlblue16 Rookie

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    Yes...a mock interview is definitely an option. And money is definitely an issue. The paychecks are ridiculous. But subbing...a diff class every day? That would make my stomach turn inside out and upside down. Seriously. I'm not good with change and I know subbing is not the job for me at this time.
     
  5. Zelda~*

    Zelda~* Devotee

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    Hi!

    I've taught Head Start for 4 years and am leaving because of the "not getting experince" in Public School deal.

    I so can sympathize. I've been jerked around by my University for my Master's level student teaching (one school didn't want me because I had no High School experince....uh, hello, that's why I wanted to student teach at the HS level!!)

    And now interviews seem to go the same way. Like you I hate, hate, hate, the idea of being a sub and not knowing where I'd be every day, but at this point that's what I'm going to do if I have to.

    I swear, when I started this whole "be a teacher" thing I was told there'd be a huuuuuuge shortage. :lol: :lol: Ironic, eh?
     
  6. Chef Dave

    Chef Dave Companion

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    May I ask whether or not you're willing to relocate? Most vacancies are found in large school districts: New York City, Houston, Los Angeles, Las Vegas (Clark County), etc.

    Here's an interesting story that will give you a behind the scene look at how far Las Vegas is willing to go to find new teachers.
    http://www.csmonitor.com/2002/0530/p01s02-ussc.html
     
  7. frogger

    frogger Devotee

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    That article was from 2002...I wonder how much of it changed since then?

     
  8. girlblue16

    girlblue16 Rookie

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    Well, I moved to Colorado 12 yrs ago from Miami for several reasons. But mostly bc I HATE the heat. So, I don't think I'd do well in Las Vegas...yes, I know its a dry heat :blush:.
    I don't have family here so not too much would be left behind except for some good friends. I guess it comes down to: do I want to teach THAT badly to move away from gorgeous Colorado :confused:.

    And the other places....eh. I appreciate the information though. :thanks:
     
    Last edited: Jun 29, 2008
  9. Chef Dave

    Chef Dave Companion

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    Whoops ... thank you for pointing that out.
     
  10. Chef Dave

    Chef Dave Companion

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    Hmmmm ... what about Seattle?

    http://www.seattleschools.org/area/employment/index.xml

    And if you like really cold weather, Alaska has persistent teacher shortages. One interesting thing about Alaska is that this state has a central "clearing house" for recruiting/placing teachers.

    http://alaskateacher.org/doku.php?id=teaching_in_alaska
     
  11. girlblue16

    girlblue16 Rookie

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    Seattle...too rainy ;). I'm very particular with temperatures, what I like and don't like, etc. Probably why I'm still single, but that's for another thread...:sorry: :p.

    I have ALWAYS thought of moving to Alaska. I don't know how well that would go over with my mom though. I mean, I'm an adult and can make my own choices, but that is really far away. But honestly, when it gets too hot out here Alaska always comes to mind. I should check it out. See if anything comes from it....then drop the bomb on my mom :eek:!!
     
  12. Chef Dave

    Chef Dave Companion

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    Hah! If you really want to get your mother's goat, get a job in Barrow on the northern coast of the Arctic Ocean. Here we are coming up on July 4th and the temperature in Barrow is a "balmy" 44 degrees! Come winter, the temperature will drop to 30 below!

    Seriously though ... unless you want to teach in a rural native village, look at Fairbanks or Anchorage.

    There are also some small towns south of Anchorage such as Cordova, Seward, or Homer.
     
  13. girlblue16

    girlblue16 Rookie

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    I'll check it out. Thanks Chef Dave!
     
  14. MuggleBug

    MuggleBug Companion

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    One of my mom's friend's daughters is currently teaching in a small village in Alaska and she has a 4th grade class of 11 students, plus a 1:1 para for a high-functioning student! Not a bad deal to me, plus I think they either pay her housing or else it's ridiculously cheap where she is. I'm not a fan of the cold and being 3,000 miles away from my family, though, otherwise I would seriously consider it!
     
  15. Ghost

    Ghost Habitué

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    Well, if it's any way to judge, the newspaper had adds for teachers in Vegas and they offered moving help and a sign on bonus.
     
  16. Historyteaching

    Historyteaching Cohort

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    Just remember, though Alaska have the highest paid teachers in the U.S. (or did). Cost of living is MUCH higher than here on the continental 48 because most things have to be imported in. There's also the 6 months night/6 months day thing and its a bit chilly up there at times I hear. I had a friend in college who lived there for a bit and he liked it and I know a ton of people that travel up that way for fishing vacations. Just gotta decide what's right for you.
    Personally, I think subbing could help you, because it can show your diversity in the ability to handle different classes and to show that you can teach kindergarten and high school and maintain classroom mgmt. A friend of mine subbed 5 years before she got hired (for this upcoming school year).
     
  17. Chef Dave

    Chef Dave Companion

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    If it's a native village, housing is probably furnished.

    I should point out that the term "rural" means something different to an Alaskan as opposed to those of us who come from the lower 48.

    In Alaska, "rural" means you're off the road grid. Completely. To get to your rural destination you either have to have to be flown in or boated in. Transportation by plane will generally be by a twin engine plane to a "hub" where you'll connect to a single prop plane to land on a dirt runway.

    On the plus side for teaching in rural Alaska:

    1) If you're a woman, the male to female ratio is ridiculously high.

    2) If you're in Alaska for over a year and become a state resident, you qualify for your share of the annual state oil dividend. In 2007 this amounted to $1,654.00.

    3) If you like fresh water salmon, Alaska is a great place to be ... either for fishing for salmon or buying it directly from a company.

    4) If you like cold weather, Alaska is certainly the place to be.

    5) If you want to save money and if you aren't picky about what you eat or how often you go into the nearest city, you can make some good money working in a rural village. Alaska BTW, does NOT have a state income tax.

    Disadvantages:
    1) Food costs will be incredibly high as nearly everything has to be transported in. Barrow probably has the highest food costs: In the village of Barrow where I live, a gallon of milk is $8, a loaf of bread is $4, soda is $10 for a 12 pack.

    2) If you go to a rural village, you'll be snowed in for the winter ... which doesn't really matter as many villages are not accessible by road ... there being no road. Villages accessible by water may have ferry service when the ice melts but for the rest of the year, the village will only be accessible by plane ... and only under decent conditions.

    Teachers I've known who have worked in rural Alaska have stocked food supplies because you can't go to the local Safeway to buy groceries ... there being no local Safeway. Since most supplies have to be flown in and customers pay by weight for transportation, light weight freeze dried and dried foods tend to be popular as opposed to heavy canned goods.

    3) As you may know, Alaska is the "land of the midnight sun." There will be times of the year when you have 24 hour darkness ... so if you enjoy daylight, you may not like Alaska. The number of days per year with midnight sun increases the further north you go.

    I've never taught in Alaska and now that I have house cats, I wouldn't want to teach there. My cats wouldn't enjoy the cold and kitty litter can run $20 or more per container depending upon where you are.

    4) Rural areas often have honey pots instead of indoor plumbing. In other words, you have a container for human waste which you're responsible for emptying in the community honey pot dump.

    5) If you enjoy a night life of movies, restaurants, and clubs ... forget rural Alaska. Night life in these areas refers to wolves and other nocturnal predators.

    The bottom line is that unless you have an adventurous soul, rural areas in Alaska can be extremely ... rustic. This is part of the reason why teacher turnover in rural areas is so high.

    In some parts of Alaska, the turnover rate for teachers is 100% within a three year period.
     
  18. Tenured

    Tenured Rookie

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    alaska also has issues with meeting NCLB laws with qualified teachers.

    I would consider it, but my parents are still alive and it would suck to lose out on remaining years with them to simply be adventerous.

    After they pass away, maybe I'll give it more thought
     
  19. LA-4

    LA-4 Rookie

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    As another poster suggested, I would try looking at big cities. I was recruited to teach in New Orleans 20 years ago. I told them if they gave me kinder or 1st in a good school I'd stay. I got a kinder job in a new magnet school and stayed there for 4 years before moving to the suburbs because I had met my husband and we were expecting a baby.

    I would suggest New Orleans since they are definitely still looking for qualified teachers since Hurricane Katrina, but you don't like heat so this isn't the place for you! :p

    But, try googling teaching jobs in New York, Chicago, or other large cities. A word of caution is that you may end up in a rough school. Be sure you are ready for heavy duty classroom management.
     
  20. Yank7

    Yank7 Habitué

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    If you really want to be a teacher you don't give up,you never know when you will find a match for you. Please don't go on an interview with a negative attitude. this school needs you and convince them how you can help the children in that school.
     
  21. girlblue16

    girlblue16 Rookie

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    I don't go in with a negative attitude. I am just bad at interviewing :unsure:. I try my hardest, research the school, the grade level, reading strategies, classroom management...EVERYTHING. I just haven't had any good luck...yet.
     
  22. girlblue16

    girlblue16 Rookie

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    Ummmm...yeah...I think you made my mind up for me with all of those fantastic facts about life in Alaska :rolleyes:. It does not sound like the place for me.

    I know New Orleans is (or at least was) looking for teachers. But again...another hot, humid place. :down:

    The search continues...

    Thank you to everyone for your replies and feedback!
     
  23. Yank7

    Yank7 Habitué

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    :sorry:
    I did not mean you are not completely prepared for the interview,but don't convince yourself you do not interview well.Each interview is different.Good Luck,something will turn up.
     
  24. girlblue16

    girlblue16 Rookie

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    Thanks. Now that I think about it, I have to be getting a little better at interviewing since I've done it so much ;). So, good advice. Thanks again!
     
  25. girlblue16

    girlblue16 Rookie

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    Well, I did it!! Not much really other than filling out the initial paperwork required for Las Vegas (Clark County) teachers. Who knows what's next. But, the world works in weird ways and maybe I'll find myself out there in a few months.

    For those interested I'll keep you posted on what happens...
     
  26. Kangaroo22

    Kangaroo22 Virtuoso

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    Good luck! I hope that you find a great position!
     
  27. girlblue16

    girlblue16 Rookie

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    Jessica, where in CO are you going to be working?
     
  28. Kangaroo22

    Kangaroo22 Virtuoso

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    I'll be in eastern Colorado, in a rural area. If you pm me I'll tell you the exact location.
     
  29. girlblue16

    girlblue16 Rookie

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    So, it's 5:35 am here in Colorado and I haven't been to sleep yet. Who else has a really messed up sleeping schedule in the summer? Ugh...it's killing me.
    Anyways, I'm watching the news. It's about 55 degrees here right now. In Las Vegas, where I'm in the process of filling out the application for Clark County at this very moment, it is 91 degrees....at 4:35 AM!!! I think I need to rethink this Las Vegas thing. Just felt like updating you guys since you've all been really helpful...and because I can't sleep :|.
    A friend of mine who used to live there who knows how I hate to be hot and sweaty said I would be miserable there.

    So....off to explore new options....and maybe get a few hours of sleep in as well.
     
  30. Jem

    Jem Aficionado

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    N. CA is the perfect weather, I think. Sunny and 65-70 every day. I have only broken a sweat on a few occasions.
     

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