When do you allow your kids to talk?

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by Bella2010, Sep 5, 2013.

  1. Bella2010

    Bella2010 Habitué

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    Sep 5, 2013

    I don't remember having this big of an issue with talking last year and wondering if maybe I'm way off base. :| I was wondering what your talking limit/expectations are - like when you allow it, noise level, etc.

    TIA,

    Beth
     
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  3. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    Sep 5, 2013

    I'm pretty strict on the talking thing. I do turn and talks during lessons so that they have a lot of opportunity to participate/talk, but I don't allow them to talk socially during academic time. Some teachers let kids talk during work time and that's just not my style. Personally, if I were working on a writing task or something and someone next to me was carrying on a social conversation, I'd have a very hard time concentrating. Obviously the ones talking aren't getting much done either.

    In resource I let the kids each share a sentence or two at the beginning of their group about whatever they want (anything they want to tell us) and then I make it clear that the rest of the time we're talking about reading, math, etc.
     
  4. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Sep 6, 2013

    I incorporate collaborative tasks often throughout my day and I also don't mind the students conferring with each other about their work most of the time. Many (most?) of my students need that opportunity to discuss their ideas to help to consolidate their understanding, so there is usually a "buzz" of conversation when the students are working. That said, I don't allow talking when I am teaching a lesson or addressing the class, and conversation must be related to the task. Social conversation must be reserved for recess or lunch.
     
  5. Lynnnn725

    Lynnnn725 Connoisseur

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    There is no talking when we're meeting whole group on the floor, unless I say turn and talk to your partner.
    When they are working at the desks, they are only able to talk about the work. It must be a super low voice so they don't disturb others, and not about random stuff - just about what they are working on.
    As of now, they are not talking during writing workshop...until we learn about writing partners.
    For the most part, there is a little bit of talking, as long as it is about their work.
     
  6. thirdgradebuzz

    thirdgradebuzz Comrade

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    Sep 6, 2013

    I incorporate as many opportunities as I can throughout the day for them to talk to a partner, the person beside them, or a small group about the specific concept we are learning. I don't allow any talking during independent work time because I personally think that it's distracting. Students are welcome to ask me questions during this time, and I am typically circulating and quietly commenting on their work anyway.
     
  7. Ted

    Ted Habitué

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    Sep 6, 2013

    Unless it has to specifically do with an assignment, directive, or discussion, I allow them to talk two times:

    Recess.
    Lunch.
     
  8. Bella2010

    Bella2010 Habitué

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    Sep 6, 2013

    This is most certainly what I prefer. It's just not clicking. Today was completely and totally crazy. I started out the day giving them a lecture about the talking issue and told them I was going to allow them to have "talk time" while I was passing out papers and taking a restroom break, a compromise of sorts. I told them when I needed their attention, I would start counting from five back to one and when I got to one I wanted silence. It worked pretty good with my morning kids. Afternoon? Not so much.

    I have assigned recess detention; given tickets (my behavior system) for positive reinforcement; changed my seating arrangement for what feels like a thousand times; etc. I feel like I've done a pretty good job at being consistent with consequences and rewards. I'm at a loss. We're almost a month in. It's exhausting me. :|

    Beth
     
  9. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    Sep 6, 2013

    I use a lot of Kagan cooperative learning structures, plus some Whole Brain Teaching activities, so my kiddos get to talk about what we are learning - some. I also tell them that when we are in "rotations," and they have a problem to "ask three, then ask me." However, any talking during group or independent work is limited to the people at your table, and should be done in a whisper. Graded work means no talking. Unfortunately, at my school, they aren't allowed to talk much at lunch, so I encourage my kids to run all they can and talk their hearts out during their 15 minutes recess!
     
  10. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    Sep 6, 2013

    With 5th graders, the Kagan has really helped for activities that allow them to talk and are held very accountable. I highly recommend the Kagan training.

    With 5th graders, I have found that classical music really quiets them down and calms them down. I use it nearly every afternoon. Bach is one artist that has much music that is slow that is very calming. I play it in the background while they are doing seat work.

    I allow them to talk during times we have partner or small group activities. I often alternate activities. For example, math might be silent, then science in small groups can be talkative then to language arts (silent) to Social Studies in partners and then calm them down with a short video (maybe 15 minutes on the Social Studies standard we are teaching.

    Each quiet time, I find the classical music really helps.

    Good Luck.:)
     
  11. Pashtun

    Pashtun Fanatic

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    Sep 6, 2013

    Have you considered having the kids be the ones chanting to five?
     
  12. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Aficionado

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    Sep 6, 2013

    I don't allow conversations while I am teaching, during read to self or while one of their classmates is addressing the class. Also while we are walking in the hall I expect them to be silent.

    If they are working at their desks I encourage them to whisper if they want to talk to the person beside them.
     
  13. iteachbx

    iteachbx Enthusiast

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    Sep 7, 2013

    I only allow talking during turn and talks, group work, that kind of thing. Otherwise I prefer quiet because I can't really enforce who's talking about work and who's just talking/distracting others. It took a super long time to achieve this with my 3rd graders last year, not sure if it was the age (I taught 4th previously) or the group. Sooo not looking to "starting all over" with this issue with a new group.
     
  14. Bella2010

    Bella2010 Habitué

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    Sep 7, 2013

    Maybe I've just forgotten how big of a pain in the rear starting over is. :p I think I'm going to start bribing them for preferred activity time on Fridays, like 15 minutes at the end of the day or something. I like the classical music idea a PP posted. In the past, I've had the kids write down some songs they like and burned them to a disc. They'd have to earn the privilege of listening to it. Side note - I always check the lyrics and subject matter of the song before burning. OMG - some of the stuff 5th graders listen to makes ME blush!!!!! And, it's nuts because I always give them a lecture about making sure it's a song that is appropriate, don't write anything down they wouldn't want their grandpa to hear them listening to, etc. And, still, some of the songs. :eek:

    Beth
     
  15. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

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    Sep 7, 2013

    I don't allow social talking during the class period at all. That's for between classes and lunch.

    No talking at all during silent reading or tests or direct instruction.

    On-task whispers during independent work.

    Soft speaking voices during group/partner work.

    Regular speaking voices for discussions.
     
  16. iteachbx

    iteachbx Enthusiast

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    Sep 7, 2013

    I think starting over sticks out in my head because last year I went from 4th to 3rd which was a bit of a bigger change than I anticipated and my class was just TOUGH. Things didn't get good until January. By June I loved them and wanted to loop. But I didn't so I'm starting over Monday lol. Hopefully it will be smoother this year.

    Side note- When I want to download songs they like (I always put them on our end of year slide show) I go with the kids bop version. Kind of corny, but my 3rd graders don't really notice the difference, or if they do they don't care.
     
  17. Mrs.Giggles

    Mrs.Giggles Companion

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    Sep 7, 2013

    I have started to incorporate "Talk Time" into my day where students can just talk. This is for about five minutes as they are a chatty class.

    I also do quite a bit of "Think Pair Share" and "Turn and Talk" in my lessons.

    I am not strict on them on being silent during Morning Work. Since I have started using incomplete Morning Work as homework, my students have been much more focused. One of my coaches thinks that it should be silent, but my kids NEED that time to talk. They only have 20 minutes to eat lunch, and those kids need to be silent for about 10-15 minutes of that lunch period. They then only have a 10 minute recess which I find even more ridiculous.

    We are STILL working on not talking during a lesson and during independent work time.
     

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